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Mary Neuburger, Director BUR 452, 2505 University Avenue, Stop F3600, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-3607

Yekaterina Cotey

Lecturer Ph.D., UT Austin

Yekaterina Cotey

Contact

RUS 611C • Intensive Russian II

44450 • Spring 2015
Meets MWF 900am-1000am GEA 127
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This course is the second semester of intensive Russian language instruction developing functional proficiency in listening, speaking, and reading. Writing will be developed both through workbook home assignments and brief reviews and summaries of your reading material. 

 

The entire second-year sequence is covered in one semester.

We will cover all of the basic textbook, Units One through Unit Ten, plus an introductory unit, in the textbook, spending about seven class days on each unit. In addition, this course aims to develop your reading skills through both in-class reading assignments, and individual “free reading” based on a text of your choosing. Portfolio exercises will continue to develop your computer literacy skills – in Russian – for you to be truly functionally proficient and competitive in the language, as well as chronicle your progress in your independent reading project throughout the course. 

RUS 601C • Intensive Russian I

45500 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm BUR 128
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Course Description:

An intensive Russian language instruction course developing functional proficiency in listening, speaking, and reading. Writing will be developed primarily through workbook and computer-based home assignments.  We will cover all of Volumes One and Two of the textbooks, Units One through Unit Fourteen in the textbooks, spending about one week on each unit. In addition, this course aims to develop computer literacy skills – in Russian – for you to be truly functional and competitive in the language.

The entire first-year sequence is covered in one semester.

Readings:

Textbook: 

• Davidson, Gor, and Lekic.  Russian: Stage One: Live from Russia! 2nd ed., vols. 1 and 2, (Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt Publishing Co. 2008 and 2009). These packaged sets comprise two basic textbooks, two workbooks, two audio CDs, and two DVDs. Available at the University Co-op.

Recommended:           

  • Russian/English Dictionary
  • Gerhart, G., The Russian’s World, Orlando: Houghton Mifflin, 1994.
  • Garza, T., Fundamentals of Russian Verbal Conjugation for Teachers  and Students, Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt and ACTR Publications, 1993.

Grading:

There are five components of your final course grade.  These components and their relative weights are:

1.  Testing:  35%

Unit tests: 15%

Final exam: 20%

2.  Homework:  15% 

3.  Participation:  15% 

4.  Portfolio:  15%

5.  Oral Presentation:  20%

REE F325 • Russian Myths And Folk Tales

87415 • Summer 2014
Meets MTWTHF 1000am-1130am BUR 228
(also listed as ANT F325L, C L F323, RUS F330 )
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Designed to explore the rich folkloric traditions that for centuries have shaped Russian national identity, literature, music, visual arts, and film. We will examine the multiple facets of Russian folklore, including fairy tales, folk superstitions, and magical rituals, such as divination, that gave their participants the sense of control over their everyday life. In our survey of folk superstitions, we will identify the main supernatural beings of Slavic folklore (demons; household and nature spirits; revenants and shapeshifters) and explore how their Otherness was used for shaping normativity and defining cultural values.

Readings:

Ivanits, Linda. Russian Folk Belief

Afanas'ev, Aleksandr, Russian Fairy Tales

Propp Vladimir, Morphology of the Folktale

...

Grading:

  1. Class attendance and active participation  20%
  2. Twenty-minute group presentation  30%
  3. Short reaction paper to a work of literature, art, or film (2-3pgs)  20%
  4. Research paper (10-12pgs)  30%

RUS F330 • Russian Myths And Folk Tales

87610 • Summer 2014
Meets MTWTHF 1000am-1130am BUR 228
(also listed as ANT F325L, C L F323, REE F325 )
show description

Designed to explore the rich folkloric traditions that for centuries have shaped Russian national identity, literature, music, visual arts, and film. We will examine the multiple facets of Russian folklore, including fairy tales, folk superstitions, and magical rituals, such as divination, that gave their participants the sense of control over their everyday life. In our survey of folk superstitions, we will identify the main supernatural beings of Slavic folklore (demons; household and nature spirits; revenants and shapeshifters) and explore how their Otherness was used for shaping normativity and defining cultural values.

Readings:

Ivanits, Linda. Russian Folk Belief

Afanas'ev, Aleksandr, Russian Fairy Tales

Propp Vladimir, Morphology of the Folktale

...

Grading:

  1. Class attendance and active participation  20%
  2. Twenty-minute group presentation  30%
  3. Short reaction paper to a work of literature, art, or film (2-3pgs)  20%
  4. Research paper (10-12pgs)  30%

RUS 507 • First-Year Russian II

44955 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm JES A207A
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Welcome back to UT and to Russian 507! This course is the continuation of your introduction to

the language and culture of one of the most influential and important regions of the world.

Russian is spoken by more that 200 million people in the former Soviet Union, and an additional

150 million throughout the world. As you begin your adventure in learning Russian, use the

resources of the Slavic Department and the Center for Russian, East European and Eurasian

Studies to further your knowledge of this fascinating region, people, and culture. And most of

all, use your instructor as a live source of information, advice, and support! Удачи!

 

Required Textbook: • Davidson, Gor, and Lekic. Russian: Stage One: Live from Russia!

vol. 2, (Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt Publishing Co. 2009). This packaged set

comprises one basic textbook, one workbook, one audio CD, and one DVD. Available

at the University Co-op.

 

GRADING

1. Testing: 50%

2. Homework: 25%

3. Participation: 20%

RUS 506 • First-Year Russian I

44790 • Fall 2011
Meets MTWTHF 100pm-200pm PAR 306
show description

Required Textbook: • Davidson, Gor, and Lekic.  Russian: Stage One: Live from Russia! vol. 1,  (Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt Publishing Co. 2008).  This packaged set comprises one basic textbook, one workbook, one audio CD, and one DVD.  Available at the University Co-op.

Recommended:

• Cruise, Edwina. English Grammar for Students of Russian, (Ann Arbor, MI: Olivia and Hill Press, 1993).

• Garza, Thomas. Fundamentals of Russian Verbal Conjugation for Teachers and Students, (Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt and ACTR Publications), 1993.

• Katzner, Kenneth, ed. English Russian/Russian English Dictionary, (New York: Wiley Publishers, 1994). 

Welcome to Russian 506! This course is designed to introduce you to the language and culture of one of the most influential and important regions of the world – today and over a millennium of history. Russian is spoken by more than 200 million people in the former Soviet Union, and an additional 150 million throughout the world. Now you can speak it, too. Удачи!

I.            General

Course Content: This course is the first semester of Russian language instruction developing functional proficiency in listening, speaking, and reading.  Writing will be developed primarily through workbook home assignments.  We will cover Units One through Unit Six in the textbook (Vol. 1), spending about two weeks on each unit.

 

Attendance Policy: You are expected to attend daily classes regularly, participate actively in class, do all assigned coursework, and take all exams.  You will be allowed a maximum of five (5) absences, excused or otherwise, during the semester.  Each absence beyond the fifth shall result in the lowering of your final course grade by a diacritic (a B+ goes to a B, a B to a B-, etc.). A student shall be considered absent after 15 minutes have elapsed from the beginning of class and the student has failed to arrive. 

Tardiness: You are to arrive to class on time. Students who arrive after class has begun shall incur a tardy. A total of three (3) tardies shall be equivalent to one (1) absence and shall count towards the five absences allowed each student. Although the instructor will maintain daily records of attendance, he/she will not update students on the status of their attendance unless otherwise requested.

Course Requirements: A Course Syllabus for the entire semester, briefly describing goals and in-class activities, is found on pp. xiii - xx in your Textbook. Corresponding homework assignments for each daily class meeting are found in the Workbook. PREPARING AND HANDING IN DAILY HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS IS ESSENTIAL TO PASS THE COURSE!  This means that you should go over and be familiar with this material (or prepare relevant questions) in advance of class. Note that Days Eight and Nine in the syllabus are combined into ONE review day for us.  You are also responsible for learning all of the words and expressions contained in the texts and exercises covered in the Course Syllabus which appear in non-italic type in the vocabulary lists at the end of each unit.  You should plan to spend about two hours of preparation for each hour in the classroom.  If you miss a class, it is your responsibility to contact your instructor or another student and find out what was covered and make up the missed work. 

Technology Policy:  Students should turn off all cell phones and electronic devices before class begins.  Texting or taking/making calls during class is unacceptable and shall reflect poorly on students' participation grade.

Special Accommodations: If you have extenuating physical circumstances, all instructors in the Slavic Department will make themselves available to discuss appropriate academic accommodations that you may require as a student with a disability.  Before course accommodations will be made, students may be required to provide documentation to the Office of the Dean of Students -- Services for Students with Disabilities.

Testing:  There will be twelve weekly quizzes, six in-class one-hour tests, and a final examination for this course.  The in-class tests, each covering one unit, will be given on September 15, September 29, October 13, October 27, November 10, and November 28. A comprehensive final exam will be given during the University's exam period between December 7 and 13, 2010.

II. Grading

There are three components of your final course grade.  These components and their relative weights are:

1.  Testing:  50%

In-class tests: 20%

Quizzes: 15%

Final exam: 15%

Because of the time constraints and pace of this course, make-ups on any of the tests will be given only in unusual cases with extenuating circumstances.

2.  Homework:  30%

Written homework or in-class quizzes (e.g., vocabulary, grammar checks, etc.) will be graded on a credit (4) / no credit (7) basis.  All assignments from the Workbook must be turned in on the class day after being assigned; a "no credit" assignment may be resubmitted for credit on the following day after being returned to the student.  Your homework grade will be the percentage of "credit" assignments you submit during the term.

3.  Participation:  20%

Your instructor determines this component as a reflection of your overall preparedness and performance in class; it is NOT merely an attendance grade.  You are expected to a) attend class daily, b) prepare assigned material in advance for each class, and c) respond in class with reasonable accuracy and, of course, enthusiasm.

The result of these calculations will be on a number on a scale of 0-100.  This numerical grade will be converted to a letter grade as follows: 

98 – 100 = A+

94 – 97 = A

90 – 93 = A-

88 – 89 = B+

84 – 87 = B

80 – 83 = B-

78 – 79 = C+

74 – 77 = C

70 – 73 = C-

68 – 69 = D+

64 – 67 = D

60 – 63 = D-

59 and below = F

III. Supplementary Materials

Your Textbook comes with an audio CD and a DVD that correspond to many of the exercises in

each unit, indicated by a "cassette" and "camera" symbol, respectively. You will greatly enhance

your own listening comprehension of Russian by downloading and using these media in your

iPod or home/car stereo as often as possible. If you prefer to use the media on campus, there are facilities available in several locations, such as the Perry Castañeda Library and Flawn Academic

Center. In addition, the Department of Slavic and Eurasian Studies has in Calhoun 422 a collection of both classic and very recent DVDs with movies, music, speeches and documentaries from and about Russia and the former Soviet states. These DVDs are interesting from both a cultural and purely entertainment point of view.

IV.  Extracurricular Activities

Every Thursday starting with the second week of classes you are invited to attend Movie Night (5 – 7 pm, room number TBD). You are required to attend at least two Movie Nights per semester (this will count towards your attendance percentage). Watching movies with subtitles is a useful and fun way of getting acquainted with Russian culture! You are also strongly encouraged to explore Russian Internet, talk to native speakers, and pursue your interests, albeit in Russian language. The instructor will give you suggestions, but you may also rely on you imagination. Be creative!

Publications

Articles

[contributor] “Славянские вампиры в Техасе: задачи и методы вампироведения (“Slavic vampires in Texas: Issues and methods of vampire studies”). With Dr. Thomas Garza. Bibliotechnoe delo. no. 4 (214), 2014, pp. 16-20.

"Ностальгия по феям" ("Nostalgia for the Fairies").” Prishestvie Fei. Moscow: Salamandra P.V.V., 2010, pp. 158 – 206

[contributor] "Мотив вторгнення у свiдомiсть як чинник негативного досвiду міжкультурної взаємодії." (“The Motif of Invasion into Consciousness as a Factor in Negative Experience of Intercultural Interaction”). With Evgeniya Kantchura. Pitannya Literaturoznavstva. 79 (2010), pp. 171 – 179.

 

Books

Невеста Субботы. (Nevesta Subboty). Moscow: AST, 2015. ISBN: 978-5-17-087719-5. (novel)

 Джейн Остен и ее современницы. (Jane Austen i ee sovremennitsy). Co-authored with Elena Prokofieva. Saint-Petersburg: BHV, 2014. ISBN: 978-5-9775-3504-5. (biography)

 Заговор призраков. (Zagovor prizrakov). Co-authored with Elena Prokofieva. Moscow: AST, 2014. ISBN: 978-5-17-079082-1. (novel)

Стены из хрусталя. (Steny iz khrustalya). Co-authored with Elena Avrutina. Moscow: Algoritm, 2014. ISBN: 978-5-4438-0637-2. (novel)

Длинная серебряная ложка. (Dlinnaya serebryanaya lozhka). Co-authored with Elena Avrutina. Moscow: Algoritm, 2013. ISBN: 978-5-4438-0579-5. (novel)

Женщины викторианской Англии. (Zhenschiny viktorianskoi Anglii). Co-authored with Elena Avrutina. Moscow: Algoritm, 2013. ISBN: 978-5-4438-0454-5. (non-fiction)

Недобрая старая Англия. (Nedobraya staraya Anglia). Saint-Petersburg: BHV, 2013. ISBN: 978-5-9775-0819-3. (non-fiction)

Жемчуг проклятых. (Zhemchug proklyatykh). Co-authored with Elena Prokofieva. Moscow: AST, 2012. ISBN: 978-5-271-44193-6. (novel)

Исторический путеводитель по Великобритании. (Istoricheskii putevoditel po Velikobritanii). Moscow: Veche, 2011. ISBN: 978-5-9533-5883-5. (non-fiction)

Суеверия викторианской Англии. (Sueveriya viktorianskoi Anglii). Co-authored with Natalia Kharsa. Moscow: Tsentrpoligraf, 2011. ISBN: 978-5-227-03021-4. (non-fiction)

 

 

Awards

Assistant Instructor of the Semester for Spring 2015. CREEES, UT Austin (2015)

Professor of the Semester for Fall 2014, UT Senate of College Councils, UT Austin (2014)

Andre Lefevre Prize for MA Report, Comparative Literature Program, UT Austin (2014)

Conferences/Talks

Mar 28, 2015 - Lost in Translation? A Russian Language Professional Development Workshop. Austin, TX. Organized the workshop and presented a talk "Oral Translation: Tricks of the Trade."

Sep 27, 2014 - Rethinking Comparison: 11th Annual Graduate Conference in Comparative Literature. Austin, TX. Presented a paper “From Folklore to Literature: Rethinking the cChangeling Myth in Nadezhda Teffi’s ‘Vurdalak.’”

Sep 26, 2014 - Rethinking Comparison: 11th Annual Graduate Conference in Comparative Literature. Austin, TX. Presented a paper “Using Modern Literary Tales to Teach Intermediate Russian.” 

Mar 5, 2014 - Religion and Spirituality Brown Bag Series. UT Austin. Presented a talk "Witchcraft in Russian Culture."

Nov 15, 2012 - Boundary, Barrier and Border Crossing: Fourth-Fourth ASEEES Annual Convention. New Orleans, LA. Served as a discussant at the panel “Crossing into the Forbidden: Eroticism and Seduction in The Master and Margarita.

Nov 9, 2012 - Death, Eros, and the Literary Enterprise: Sixty-Ninth Annual Convention of SCMLA. San Antonio, TX. Presented a paperWitches, Devils, and Phallic Briefcases: Folklore and Gender in The Master and Margarita

Oct 27, 2011 - Sources of Inspiration: Sixty-Eighth Annual Convention of SCMLA. Hot Springs, AR. Presented a paper “Soviet Witches: Female Body and Agency in Bulgakov's The Master and Margarita.”

Oct 28, 2010 - New Frontiers: Sixty-Seventh Annual Convention of SCMLA. Fort Worth, TX. Chaired the panel “Russian Literature: Open Topic”

Oct 2, 2010 - Intimacy: Technologies of Feeling and Fantasy: 7thAnnual Graduate Conference in Comparative Literature. Austin, TX. Presented a paper “Desiring the Monster: Intimacy and the Abject in Nikolai Gogol’s ‘Viy’”

Apr 2, 2010 - Creoles, Diasporas, Cosmopolitanisms: ACLA Annual Conference. New Orleans, LA. Presented a paper “Salvation or Stagnation? Constructions of Childhood in The Brothers Karamazov

Oct 30, 2009 - Continuities and Dis/Replacements: Sixty-Sixth Annual Convention of SCMLA. Baton Rouge, LA. Presented a paper “Between Vampyre and Upyr: The Vampiric Theme in Pushkin's Literary Legacy."

Oct 11, 2008 - 1968: a Global Perspective: 5thAnnual Graduate Conference in Comparative Literature. Austin, TX. Presented a paper “From 1968 to 1825: Impact of the Prague Spring on Dissident Poetry.”

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