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Lisa Moore Interim, Director 2505 University Avenue, A4900, Burdine Hall 536, Austin Texas 78712 • 512-471-5765

Alison K. Frazier

Associate Faculty Ph.D., 1997, Columbia University

Associate Professor
Alison K. Frazier

Contact

Biography

Research interests

Current research projects include editions of humanist saints' lives; a study of a quattrocento hexameral commentary; a census of Bonino Mombrizio's c. 1477 "Sanctuarium"

Courses taught

Medieval and Renaissance Continental Europe, especially intellectual history, religion, hagiography, biblical exegesis, manuscripts and printing

WGS F340 • Italian Renaissance, 1350-1550

89205 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTHF 830am-1000am GAR 1.126
(also listed as EUS F346, HIS F343G, R S F357 )
show description

Description. This upper-division course combines lecture, group work, and discussion to introduce the political, social, economic, and cultural phenomena that made the Italian peninsula such a lively place between 1350 and 1550. Drawing on a wide range of primary sources, we examine cultural production in many realms of human experience. Emphasis falls upon the “recovery of learning” and its effect on areas ranging from religion and gender, to economics, politics, technology, and art.

 

This course aims to teach the analysis of historical evidence. By semester’s end, you will have read some of the most influential and controversial works from this period. You will be able to put them in historical context, to describe how historians use them, and to explain why they remain compelling today.

 

This course has no prerequisites and assumes no prior knowledge of the subject, but students are presumed to be capable of critical reflection upon both lectures and readings.

 

Readings may include:

Boccaccio, Decameron

            Alberti, On the Family

            Machiavelli, Mandragola

            Castiglione, The Courtier

            Vasari, Lives of the Artists

            Aretino, Master of the Horse

 

Assignments include:

            Quizzes

            Reading responses

            Two exams

 

 

WGS 393 • Italy Relig/Society: 1300-1500

47180 • Fall 2011
Meets TH 330pm-630pm GAR 1.122
(also listed as ITL 382, MDV 392M, R S 390T )
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This graduate reading course is designed to introduce new scholarship that has brought the study of religion on the Italian peninsula “out of the shadows” and into the mainstream. By examining topics ranging from institutional developments and civic practices to lived religion, students map the interaction of the new historiography with broader trends in the study of Gender, the State, the Papacy, the Emotions, Space/Place, Material Culture, Heresy & Crusading, Patronage, Intellectual History, and the Mediterranean World. Those interested will have opportunities to read primary sources in original languages and to work on paleography.  

 

Readings may include:

Articles by e.g. Bynum, Jenson, Rusconi, Zarri

Thompson, Cities of God

Muir, Civic Ritual

Miller, Bishop’s Palace

Bornstein, The Bianchi of 1399

Weinstein and Bell, Saints and Society

 

Requirements. Group-oriented participation in discussion is basic to this course (30%). Students write eight weekly 2 page analytic summaries of the hypotheses, methodologies, and sources relevant to readings (40%). In addition, students take turns introducing and summarizing discussion (20%), and presenting author and review reports (10%).   

WGS 340 • Italian Renaissance, 1350-1550

47670 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 900am-1000am GAR 1.126
(also listed as AHC 330, HIS 343G, R S 357 )
show description

This upper-division course combines lecture and discussion to introduce the political, social, economic, and cultural phenomena that made the Italian peninsula such a lively place between 1350 and 1550. Drawing on a range of primary source readings, we will analyze continuity and change in many realms of human experience. Emphasis will be placed upon the “recovery of learning” and its effect on areas ranging from religion and gender, to economics, technology, and art. 

The aim of this course is to help you become more thoughtful about historical analysis of continuity and change in such contentious fields as politics, gender, and religion. By semester’s end, you will have read some of the most influential and controversial works from this period, and will be able to put them in historical context and explain why they remain compelling today. 

This course has no prerequisites and assumes no prior knowledge of the subject, but students are presumed to be capable of critical reflection upon both lectures and readings.

Assignments include:

    Map quiz

    Reading worksheets 

    Two essay exams

Readings may include:

Boccaccio, Decameron 

Alberti, On Painting 

Machiavelli, Discourses

Nogarola, Letters 

Castiglione, The Courtier 

Aretino, Master of the Horse

WGS 345 • Creation

47707 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm GAR 1.134
(also listed as EUS 346, HIS 350L, R S 373 )
show description

HIS 350L

This senior-level, writing-intensive seminar examines interpretations of Genesis 1-3 in the premodern world. By reading authors from Plato to Galileo, and by considering a variety of religious traditions, students investigate the rich variety of responses to the idea of Creation. In conversation, students explore together the implications of arguments about Creation for early developments in western theology, science, and philosophy. Reading worksheets and small group work help students learn to articulate their responses fully.

By the end of the semester, you will be able to describe how premodern efforts to understand Genesis 1-3 affected developments in science, philosophy, and theology. You will have written essays leading to a research paper that deepens your knowledge in a specialized area and develops your analytic skills.

This course has no prerequisites and assumes no prior knowledge of the subject, but students are presumed to be capable of critical reflection upon readings and discussion.

A SEMINAR IS NOT A LECTURE COURSE. YOUR CAREFUL PREPARATION OF ALL ASSIGNMENTS IS REQUIRED FOR THE COURSE TO WORK.

Readings may include

Plato, Timaeus

Augustine, Genesis against the Manichees

Selections from al-Tabari

Selections from Maimonides

Selections from Thomas Aquinas

Selections from Luther’s Sermons

Galileo, Letter to Queen Christina

Assignments may include

Map quiz

Reading worksheets

Two essays of graduated length (3/5 pp)

Final research paper (8-10pp)

 

Publications

Books & Articles

  • A Layman’s Life of St. Augustine: Patronage and Polemic” with edited text and appendix. Traditio 65 (2010): 231-86.
  • Possible Lives:  Authors and Saints in Renaissance Italy.  New York:  Columbia University Press, 2005.
    Winner of the 2006 Gordon Prize from the Renaissance Society of America for the best book in Renaissance Studies.
  • “Luca della Robbia’s Narrative on the Deaths of Boscoli and Capponi.”  In The Art of Executing Well:  Rituals of Execution in Renaissance Italy, edited by N. Terpstra.  Kirksville, MO:  Truman State University Press, 2008.
  • “Machiavelli, Trauma, and the Scandal of The Prince:  An Essay in Speculative History.”  In History in the Comic Mode:  Medieval Communities and the Matter of Person, edited by R. Fulton and B. Holsinger.  New York:  Columbia University Press, 2007.
  • “The First Instructions on Writing about Saints:  Aurelio Brandolini (c.1454-97) and Raffaele Maffei (1455-1522).” Memoirs of the American Academy in Rome 48 (2003).
  • “Katherine’s Place in a Renaissance Collection:  Evidence from Antonio degli Agli (c. 1400-1477), De vitis et gestis sanctorum.”  In St. Katherine of Alexandria.  Texts and Contexts in Western Medieval Europe, edited by Jacqueline Jenkins and Katherine Lewis.  Brepols:  Turnhout, 2003.

Forthcoming:

  • “Biography as an Ethical Genre” in D.A. Lines and S. Ebbersmeyer, eds., Rethinking Virtue, Reforming Society: New Directions in Renaissance Ethics (Turnhout: Brepols, forthcoming 2012).
  • “Who Wrote the First Life of Lorenzo de’ Medici?” in M. Isräels and L. Waldman, eds.,Renaissance Studies in Honor of Joseph Connors (Florence: Olschki, forthcoming 2012).
  • “Les Augustins patrons d’un humaniste laïc? Le cas de Giovanni Garzoni de Bologne” in C. Caby and R.M. Dessi, eds., Les Humanistes et l’Eglise. Pratiques culturelles et échanges entre les litterati laïcs et ecclésiastiques (Italie, début XIIIe-début XVIe siècle). Paris/Nice: CNRS, forthcoming. 
  • “Humanist Lives of St. Catherine of Siena” in J. Hamburger and G. Signori, eds.,  Catherine of Siena: The Creation of a Cult (Medieval Women: Texts and Contexts) (Turnhout: Brepols, forthcoming 2012)

        




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