Skip Navigation
UT wordmark
College of Liberal Arts wordmark
cwgs masthead
Dr. Susan Sage Heinzelman, Director 2505 University Avenue, A4900, Burdine Hall 536, Austin Texas 78712 • 512-471-5765

Juliet Hooker

Core Faculty Ph.D., Cornell University

Associate Professor
Juliet Hooker

Contact

Biography

Prof. Hooker is Associate Professor of Government and African and African Diaspora Studies. She specializes in comparative political theory and critical race theory. Her primary research interests include black political thought, Latin American political thought, political solidarity, multiculturalism, and feminist theory; she has also published on Afro-descendant and indigenous politics and multicultural rights in Latin America. She is the author of Race and the Politics of Solidarity (Oxford University Press, 2009); her articles have appeared in journals such as Politics, Groups and Identities, Souls, Journal of Latin American Studies, and Latin American Research Review. From 2009 to 2014 Professor Hooker served as Associate Director of the Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies (LLILAS) at UT-Austin. She received the Lucia, John, and Melissa Gilbert Award for Teaching Excellence in Women's and Gender Studies in 2008, and has held visiting fellowships at the Du Bois Institute for African American Research at Harvard University and the Kellogg Institute for International Studies at the University of Notre Dame.

WGS 340 • The Us And 3rd-World Feminisms

47801 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 930am-1100am CLA 0.120
(also listed as GOV 335M )
show description
Course Description

This course explores the variety of feminisms developed by women of color and non-western women to critique the racism and ethnocentrism of white-dominated systems and practices, including feminism. Its overall concern is with the contemporary re-conceptualizations of feminism in light of "difference" as a result of the critical perspectives developed by women of color. We begin by examining the dominant approaches to feminist theory that emerged in the United States and Europe, such as liberal, Marxist, and radical feminism, as well as feminist epistemology and post-modern feminist analyses. We will then focus on the critiques of these traditions developed by women of color and their insistence on the need to address the intersections of race, gender, sexuality, and class.  Finally, we will examine recent debates regarding the politics of sexuality, the role of men in feminism, the relationship between race, gender and sexuality, and Arab feminism.

Grading Policy

Grades will be assessed based on class participation, 2 short essays, and a final paper. 

WGS S340 • Afro-Caribbean Pol/Cul-Nic

89300 • Summer 2012
Meets
(also listed as AFR S374E, GOV S365N )
show description

STUDY ABROAD COURSE

Course Description

This course will examine the politics of race, culture, nation, and political mobilization among Afro-Caribbean communities on Central America’s Caribbean Coast. It will discuss the historical process by which these communities were formed in the region during the colonial era, different periods of labor migration, the emergence of anti-Black mestizo nationalism, and contemporary struggles for racial justice. Students will learn how Afro-Caribbean populations have drawn from their Caribbean roots to navigate and resist persistent patterns of racial, gender, and economic inequality and have challenged the racially defined limits of citizenship and national belonging within mestizo nation-states. The course will provide students with a foundation for understanding larger racial formation patterns in Central America and ground this analysis in historical and ethnographic studies of Afro-Caribbean populations in Nicaragua, Honduras, Costa Rica, Panama, and Belize.

WGS 340 • The Us And 3rd-World Feminisms

46990 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm WEL 3.402
(also listed as GOV 335M )
show description

This course explores the variety of feminisms developed by women of color and non-western women to critique the racism and ethnocentrism of white-dominated systems and practices, including feminism. Its overall concern is with the contemporary re-conceptualizations of feminism in light of "difference" as a result of the critical perspectives developed by women of color. We begin by examining the dominant approaches to feminist theory that emerged in the United States and Europe, such as liberal, Marxist, and radical feminism, as well as feminist epistemology and post-modern feminist analyses. We will then focus on the critiques of these traditions developed by women of color and their insistence on the need to address the intersections of race, gender, sexuality, and class.  Finally, we will examine recent debates regarding the politics of sexuality, the role of men in feminism, the relationship between race, gender and sexuality, and Arab feminism.

WGS 340 • The Us And 3rd-World Feminisms

47683 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm MEZ 2.210
(also listed as GOV 335M )
show description

This course explores the variety of feminisms developed by women of color and non-western women to critique the racism and ethnocentrism of white-dominated systems and practices, including feminism. Its overall concern is with the contemporary re-conceptualizations of feminism in light of "difference" as a result of the critical perspectives developed by women of color. We begin by examining the dominant approaches to feminist theory that emerged in the United States and Europe, such as liberal, Marxist, and radical feminism, as well as feminist epistemology and post-modern feminist analyses. We will then focus on the critiques of these traditions developed by women of color and their insistence on the need to address the intersections of race, gender, sexuality, and class.  Finally, we will examine recent debates regarding the politics of sexuality, the role of men in feminism, the relationship between race, gender and sexuality, and Arab feminism.

 

Grades will be assessed based on class participation, 3 short essays, and a final paper.

Publications

Hooker, Juliet. 2014. “Hybrid Subjectivities, Latin American Mestizaje, and Latino Political Thought on Race,” Politics, Groups, and Identities 2, 2 (2014): p. 188-201.

Hooker, Juliet. 2012. “Negotiating Blackness within the Multicultural State: Creole Politics and Identity in Nicaragua,” in Kwame Dixon and John Burdick (eds.), Comparative Perspectives on Afro Latin America (Gainesville, FL: University Press of Florida, 2012), p. 264-281.

Hooker, Juliet. 2011. “Indigenous Rights in Latin America: How to Classify Afro-descendants?” in Will Kymlicka and Avigail Eisenberg (eds.), Identity Politics in the Public Realm: Bringing Institutions Back In (Vancouver, Canada: University of British Columbia Press, 2011), p. 104-136. 

Hooker, Juliet. 2010. “Race and the Space of Citizenship: the Mosquito Coast and the Place of Blackness and Indigeneity in Nicaragua,” in Lowell Gudmundson and Justin Wolfe (eds.), Blacks and Blackness in Central America: Between Race and Place (Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2010), p. 246-277.

Hooker, Juliet. 2009. Race and the Politics of Solidarity (NY: Oxford University Press, 2009).    

Hooker, Juliet. 2008. “Afro-descendant Struggles for Collective Rights in Latin America,” Souls: A Critical Journal of Black Politics, Culture and Society 10, no. 3 (July-September 2008): p. 279-291. 

Hooker, Juliet. 2005b. “‘Beloved Enemies’: Race and Official Mestizo Nationalism in Nicaragua,” Latin American Research Review 40, no. 3 (October 2005): p. 14-39.

Hooker, Juliet. 2005a. “Indigenous Inclusion/Black Exclusion: Race, Ethnicity, and Multicultural Citizenship in Latin America,” Journal of Latin American Studies 37, no. 2 (May 2005): p. 285-310.

 

bottom border