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Lisa Moore Interim, Director 2505 University Avenue, A4900, Burdine Hall 536, Austin Texas 78712 • 512-471-5765

Bea Ann Smith

Associate Faculty JD

Professor

Contact

Biography

Smith earned her J.D. with honors from the Law School where she was Order of the Coif and a member of the Texas Law Review. She was a law clerk to Judge Thomas Gibbs Gee on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit. Before being elected to the bench, she worked in private practice and served as an adjunct professor at the Law School.

In addition to her service on the bench, Smith has had a distinguished career in public service. She was president of the National Association of Women Judges and currently sits on the board of the directors of the International Association of Women Judges. Smith is also a founding director of Volunteer Legal Services of Central Texas and has served the Law School as an adjunct professor and advisor to the Texas Journal of Women and the Law.

Smith has been a leading force behind the Law School's Judicial Internship Program. She had spent six years teaching at the Law School before she joined the Third Court of Appeals and decided to start a judicial internship program at the Court. When the program began in 1992, judges supervised an intern a semester. Over time, the program grew to allow more students to participate. Asked about the judicial internships' benefits, Smith said, "I always stressed to students that the best part of their internships would be the improvement in their writing skills. And I think we lived up to our part of that bargain."

"Justice Smith created a very rigorous internship program that has provided invaluable educational experiences for our students," said Eden Harrington, Director of the Justice Center. "The Court asks our students to perform at the highest level, and they meet the challenge. We are very grateful to Justice Smith for setting the standard so high."

Currently, in the spring and fall semesters the Judicial Internship Program serves 15 to 20 students who intern in Austin with the Third Court of Appeals, the Texas Supreme Court and the Court of Criminal Appeals, as well as with federal judges, the Travis County Probate Court, and the State Office of Administrative Hearings. In addition to working in the judges' chambers, students participate in a weekly classroom course at the Law School. In 2004, the Law School expanded the summer program to permit students to intern with federal court judges and state appellate judges outside of Austin. More than 60 students have participated each summer. In the last three years, students have worked with 47 state appellate judges in Texas, six state appellate judges in five other states, and 67 federal judges in Texas and across the country.

WGS 345 • The Face Of Justice-Honors

47920 • Fall 2014
Meets M 300pm-600pm CAL 200
(also listed as GOV 357M, LAH 350 )
show description

Course Description:

 

In our democracy, justice concerns certain inalienable rights: liberty, due process, equality. And it concerns freedom from governmental intrusion on the right to speak, to assemble, to be secure in our homes, to practice or not practice any religion we choose.  Certainly justice includes some notion of fairness. These fundamental values are expressed in the Declaration of Independence and the Bill of Rights. The Face of Justice reflects the individuals whose rights are being protected (and those whose rights are being overlooked) by our operating system of justice at given time.

 

Flags:

 

Writing

Cultural Diversity

Ethics and Leadership

 

Texts:

 

Our readings and our discussions will include historical documents, legal opinions, speeches, biographical materials—and of course the Bill of Rights, the Declaration of Independence, and certain sections of the Constitution. We will have a number of guest lecturers throughout the semester.“We the People” by Professor Penny White, University of Tennessee College of Law. Declaration of Independence, Bill of Rights (Amendments 1-10), 13th, 14th, 15th, and 19thAmendments (in your written materials)Angela Roddey Holder, The Meaning of the Constitution (2d ed. 987), p.55 Susan Wiltshire, Greece, Rome, and the Bill of Rights (1992) Introduction, pp. 1-6, Chapter 1, pp. 9-29, Chapter 5 pp. 89-100Reread: Declaration of Independence Amendments: 13, 14, 15, 19, 24, 26Selected documents and essays from Our Mothers Before Us, Women and Democracy1789-1920. The Handbook of Texas, Woman Suffrage in Texas, Texas State Historical Society Association, 1997-2002.The Woman Who Ran for President, by Lois Beachy Underhill, Prologue, Chapters 8, 9,11. “Victoria Woodhull through Modern Eyes” by Gloria Steinem. Excerpts from Woodhull & Claflin’s Weekly newspaper “Upward and Onward.”Jane M. Friedman, America’s First Woman Lawyer: The Biography of Myra Bradwell (1993) Chap. 1, 7, 9, 10, Prologue and Epilogue Bradwell v. Illinois, 16 Wall 130 (1873), concurring opinion. Mary Beth Rogers, Barbara Jordan, American Hero (1998) Chap. 6 & 7, Chap. 13 & 15Max Sherman, Barbara Jordan: Speaking the Truth with Eloquent Thunder (2007). The following speeches: Constitutional Basis for Impeachment (1974); Testimony in Opposition to Robert Bork (1987); Remarks by Bill Moyers (1996).

 

Requirements:

 

This is a small class. It will not work unless you read the assignments every week, come to class, and participate in the discussion. Attendance is required. After three unexcused absences, your grade will be reduced by 10% for every absence.10% of the final grade will reflect class participation. This is a writing course. You will write two short papers (3-4 pages) one in September, one in October. I will edit your first draft and return it to you for revision. You will be graded on the revision only. These two papers each represent 20% of your grade. After the middle of the course, you will select a topic (with guidance) for a longer paper (8-10pages). Again, you will submit a draft that I will edit and return to you for revision. The final paper will be due shortly after the end of classes and will constitute 50% of your grade. There will be no final exam.

WGS 345 • Face Of Justice-Honors

47830 • Fall 2013
Meets T 330pm-630pm MEZ 2.118
(also listed as GOV 357M, LAH 350 )
show description

In our democracy, justice concerns certain inalienable rights: liberty, due process, equality. And it concerns freedom from governmental intrusion on the right to speak, to assemble, to be secure in our homes, to practice or not practice any religion we choose.  Certainly justice includes some notion of fairness. These fundamental values are expressed in the Declaration of Independence and the Bill of Rights. The Face of Justice reflects the individuals whose rights are being protected (and those whose rights are being overlooked) by our operating system of justice at given time.

WGS 345 • Face Of Justice-Honors

47120 • Fall 2012
Meets T 330pm-630pm MEZ 2.118
(also listed as GOV 357M, LAH 350 )
show description

What do I mean by the Face of Justice? In our democracy, justice concerns certaininalienable rights: liberty, due process, equality. And it concerns freedom fromgovernmental intrusion on the right to speak, to assemble, to be secure in our homes, topractice or not practice any religion we choose. Certainly justice includes some notion offairness. These fundamental values are expressed in the Declaration of Independence andthe Bill of Rights. The Face of Justice reflects the individuals whose rights are beingprotected (and those whose rights are being overlooked) by our operating system ofjustice at given time. But these rights have little meaning without a political structure that enforces them. OurConstitution establishes a unique form of government, characterized by a separation ofpowers and an independent.judiciary. The Face of Justice also reflects the individualswho are allowed to fully participate (and those who are excluded) in the civic andpolitical society that enforces our individual rights.Women are not the only individuals whose rights have been overlooked even under ourConstitution, even under our Bill of Rights. Women are not the only actors who havebeen formally excluded from voting, running for office, holding and managing theirproperty, serving on juries, obtaining the education they seek, entering the professionsthey desire, and receiving equal pay for the work they perform. By focusing on the ways that women have been excluded from political, educational and professional opportunities, and their struggles to redefine their rights and their roles, we learn that justice is never fully attained and is never fully secure. It is my hope that by observing some of the faces once excluded from the tent of justice, we can learn to recognize those who are still excluded. It is my hope that by studying the persistence and doggedness of those who were once excluded, that we may find the courage to further extend thepromises of justice and to shore up the institutions that enforce it. This is a small class and it will only work if you do the readings and participate in the discussions. Attendence is required.

WGS 345 • Face Of Justice-Honors

47010 • Fall 2011
Meets T 330pm-630pm JES A215A
(also listed as GOV 357M, LAH 350 )
show description

What do I mean by the Face of Justice? In our democracy, justice concerns certaininalienable rights: liberty, due process, equality. And it concerns freedom fromgovernmental intrusion on the right to speak, to assemble, to be secure in our homes, topractice or not practice any religion we choose. Certainly justice includes some notion offairness. These fundamental values are expressed in the Declaration of Independence andthe Bill of Rights. The Face of Justice reflects the individuals whose rights are beingprotected (and those whose rights are being overlooked) by our operating system ofjustice at given time. But these rights have little meaning without a political structure that enforces them. OurConstitution establishes a unique form of government, characterized by a separation ofpowers and an independent.judiciary. The Face of Justice also reflects the individualswho are allowed to fully participate (and those who are excluded) in the civic andpolitical society that enforces our individual rights.Women are not the only individuals whose rights have been overlooked even under ourConstitution, even under our Bill of Rights. Women are not the only actors who havebeen formally excluded from voting, running for office, holding and managing theirproperty, serving on juries, obtaining the education they seek, entering the professionsthey desire, and receiving equal pay for the work they perform. By focusing on the ways that women have been excluded from political, educational and professional opportunities, and their struggles to redefine their rights and their roles, we learn that justice is never fully attained and is never fully secure. It is my hope that by observing some of the faces once excluded from the tent of justice, we can learn to recognize those who are still excluded. It is my hope that by studying the persistence and doggedness of those who were once excluded, that we may find the courage to further extend thepromises of justice and to shore up the institutions that enforce it. This is a small class and it will only work if you do the readings and participate in the discussions. Attendence is required.

 

This course contains a Writing Flag and fulfills a Cultural Diversity flag.

 

Texts:

Our readings and our discussions will include historical documents, legal opinions,speeches, biographical materials—and of course the Bill of Rights, the Declaration ofIndependence, and certain sections of the Constitution. We will have a number of guestlecturers throughout the semester.“We the People” by Professor Penny White, University of Tennessee College of Law.Declaration of Independence, Bill of Rights (Amendments 1-10), 13th, 14th, 15th, and 19thAmendments (in your written materials)Angela Roddey Holder, The Meaning of the Constitution (2d ed. 987), p.55 Susan Wiltshire, Greece, Rome, and the Bill of Rights (1992) Introduction, pp. 1-6, Chapter 1, pp. 9-29, Chapter 5 pp. 89-100Reread: Declaration of Independence Amendments: 13, 14, 15, 19, 24, 26Selected documents and essays from Our Mothers Before Us, Women and Democracy1789-1920. The Handbook of Texas, Woman Suffrage in Texas, Texas State HistoricalSociety Association, 1997-2002.The Woman Who Ran for President, by Lois Beachy Underhill, Prologue, Chapters 8, 9,11. “Victoria Woodhull through Modern Eyes” by Gloria Steinem.Excerpts from Woodhull & Claflin’s Weekly newspaper “Upward and Onward.”Jane M. Friedman, America’s First Woman Lawyer: The Biography of Myra Bradwell(1993) Chap. 1, 7, 9, 10, Prologue and EpilogueBradwell v. Illinois, 16 Wall 130 (1873), concurring opinion.Mary Beth Rogers, Barbara Jordan, American Hero (1998) Chap. 6 & 7, Chap. 13 & 15Max Sherman, Barbara Jordan: Speaking the Truth with Eloquent Thunder (2007). The following speeches: Constitutional Basis for Impeachment (1974); Testimony inOpposition to Robert Bork (1987); Remarks by Bill Moyers (1996).

 

Requirements:

This is a small class. It will not work unless you read the assignments every week, cometo class, and participate in the discussion. Attendance is required. After three unexcusedabsences, your grade will be reduced by 10% for every absence.10% of the final grade will reflect class participation.This is a writing course. You will write two short papers (3-4 pages) one in September,one in October. I will edit your first draft and return it to you for revision. You will begraded on the revision only. These two papers each represent 20% of your grade. Afterthe middle of the course, you will select a topic (with guidance) for a longer paper (8-10pages). Again, you will submit a draft that I will edit and return to you for revision. Thefinal paper will be due shortly after the end of classes and will constitute 50% of yourgrade. There will be no final exam.

WGS 345 • Face Of Justice-Honors

47710 • Spring 2011
Meets TH 300pm-600pm JES A216A
(also listed as GOV 357M, LAH 350 )
show description

What do I mean by the Face of Justice? In our democracy, justice concerns certaininalienable rights: liberty, due process, equality. And it concerns freedom fromgovernmental intrusion on the right to speak, to assemble, to be secure in our homes, topractice or not practice any religion we choose. Certainly justice includes some notion offairness. These fundamental values are expressed in the Declaration of Independence andthe Bill of Rights. The Face of Justice reflects the individuals whose rights are beingprotected (and those whose rights are being overlooked) by our operating system ofjustice at given time.But these rights have little meaning without a political structure that enforces them. OurConstitution establishes a unique form of government, characterized by a separation ofpowers and an independent.judiciary. The Face of Justice also reflects the individualswho are allowed to fully participate (and those who are excluded) in the civic andpolitical society that enforces our individual rights.Women are not the only individuals whose rights have been overlooked even under ourConstitution, even under our Bill of Rights. Women are not the only actors who havebeen formally excluded from voting, running for office, holding and managing theirproperty, serving on juries, obtaining the education they seek, entering the professionsthey desire, and receiving equal pay for the work they perform. By focusing on the waysthat women have been excluded from political, educational and professionalopportunities, and their struggles to redefine their rights and their roles, we learn thatjustice is never fully attained and is never fully secure. It is my hope that by observingsome of the faces once excluded from the tent of justice, we can learn to recognize thosewho are still excluded. It is my hope that by studying the persistence and doggednessofthose who were once excluded, that we may find the courage to further extend thepromises of justice and to shore up the institutions that enforce it.

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