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Edmund T. Gordon, Chair 2109 San Jacinto Blvd , Mailcode E3400, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-4362

Deborah Paredez

Ph.D., Northwestern University

Associate Professor of Theatre and Dance and of English
Deborah Paredez

Contact

Biography

Deborah Paredez holds a Ph.D. from the Interdisciplinary Theatre and Drama Program at Northwestern University. She teaches courses about race and performance in the Department of Theatre, the Center for Mexican American Studies, and the Center for African & African American Studies. Her recent scholarship has focused on U.S. Latina/o performance and popular culture. Her articles, "Remembering Selena, Re-membering Latinidad," (Theatre Journal, 2002) and "Becoming Selena, Becoming Latina" (Women and Migration in the US-Mexico Borderlands, Duke University Press, 2007) comprise part of her book, Selenidad: Selena, Latinos, and the Performance of Memory (Duke University Press 2009), that explores the afterlife of the Tejana performer, Selena Quintanilla Perez. Her recent article, "All About My (Absent) Mother: Latina Aspirations in Real Women Have Curves and Ugly Betty," will appear in the anthology, Beyond El Barrio: Everyday Life in Latina/o America, under contract with New York University Press. Her next project, for which she received a 2008-09 AAUW Postdoctoral Fellowship, will focus on arts activism among communities of color in the Bronx.

Deborah will serve as Associate Director of the Center for Mexican American Studies for the 2009-2010 year and will also continue her work as Director of Arts and Community Engagement (ACE) in the Vice President's Office for Diversity and Community Engagement.

In addition to her work as a theatre scholar and performer, Deborah is also a poet. She is the author of This Side of Skin (Wings Press, 2002) and the recipient of the Alfredo Cisneros del Moral Foundation Writing Award founded by Sandra Cisneros. Her poems have also appeared in Daughters of the Fifth Sun: A Collection of U.S. Latina Fiction and Poetry (Putnam, 1995), This Promiscuous Light (Wings Press, 1996), Floricanto Sí! A Collection of Latina Poetry (Penguin, 1998), and The Wind Shifts: New Latino Poetry (University of Arizona Press, 2007). She is currently at work on her second poetry volume, After the Light. Beyond the university, Deborah has taught writing workshops with young people of color in a range of venues.

Interests

U.S. Latina/o performance and popular culture, Women and Migration in the US-Mexico Borderlands, Selena Quintanilla Perez

AFR 372E • Black And Latina/O Performance

30370 • Fall 2013
Meets MW 300pm-430pm SAC 5.102
(also listed as E 376M )
show description

Instructor:  Paredez, D            Areas:  V / G

Unique #:  35955            Flags:  Cultural Diversity

Semester:  Fall 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  AFR 372E, MAS 374 (pending approval)            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: In recent years, numerous public discussions and critical commentaries have focused on the purported tensions between Black and Latino communities. By examining Black and Latino artistic products and cultural practices from the 1940s to the present, the historical trajectory of this course encourages students to challenge recent constructions of Black/Latino relations as inherently conflictual. We will pay particular attention to both thematic resonances between Black and Latino art and to actual Black/Latino artistic collaborations in theatre, dance, performance art, performance poetry, music, fashion and style. We will also study works by Afro-Latino artists whose art disrupts the discrete categories that often separate the two communities. Throughout the course, students will 1) chart a history of collaborations and resonances between Black and Latino artists; 2) identify Black and Latino aesthetic styles and traditions; and 3) develop and practice analytical skills for approaching the question: "What is Black and/or Latino performance?"

Texts to be selected from the following among others: (description approved by DP for posting as is, 3/11/13; no narrowing down of texts yet.)

Elam, Harry. Taking It to the Streets: The Social Protest Theater of Luis Valdez and Amiri Baraka

Gamson, Joshua. The Fabulous Sylvester: The Legend, the Music, the Seventies in San Francisco

shange, ntozake. for colored girls who have considered suicide/when the rainbow is enuf

Baraka, Amiri/Jones, Leroi. "AM/TRAK." Jazz Poetry Anthology. Eds. Sascha Feinstein & Yusef Komunyakaa. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1991.

_____. Dutchman. New York: Harper, 1971.

7_____. "A Jazz Great: John Coltrane." Black Music. New York: W. Morrow, 1967. 56-62.

_____. "The Revolutionary Theatre." http://www.english.uiuc.edu/maps/blackarts/documents.htm.

Flores, Juan. "Cha-Cha with a Back Beat: Songs and Stories of Latin Boogaloo." Situating Salsa: Global Markets and Local Meanings in Popular Music. Ed. Lise Waxer. New York: Routledge, 2002. 75-100.

Fusco, Coco. "Performance and Power of the Popular." Let’s Get It On: The Politics of Black Performance. Seattle: Bay Press, 1995. 158-176.

George-Graves, Nadine. "Basic Black." Theatre Journal 57.4 (2005): 610-612.

Habell-Pallán, Michelle & Mary Romero, "Introduction." Latino/a Popular Culture, Ed. Habell-Pallán & Romero. New York: New York University Press, 2002. 1-7.

Hall, Stuart Hall. "What is this Black in Black Popular Culture?" Black Popular Culture. Ed. Gina Dent. Seattle: Bay Press, 1992. 20-33.

Jacques, Geoffrey. "CuBop! Afro-Cuban Music and Mid-Twentieth Century American Culture." Between Race and Empire: African Americans and Cubans Before the Cuban Revolution. Eds. Lisa Brock & Digna Castenada-Fuertes. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1998. 249-265.

Kelley, Robin D. G. "The Riddle of the Zoot: Malcolm Little and Black Cultural Politics During World War II" Race Rebels: Culture, Politics, and the Black Working Class. New York: Free Press, 1994. 161-182.

Lott, Eric. "Double V, Double Time: Bebop's Politics of Style." Jazz Among the Discourses.  Ed. Krin Gabbard. Durham: Duke University Press, 1995. 243-255.

McCauley, Robbie. Sally's Rape. Moon Marked and Touched by Sun: Plays by African-American Women. Ed. Sydne Mahone. New York: Theatre Communications Group, 1994. 211-238.

_____. "Thoughts on My Career, The Other Weapon, and Other Projects." Performance and Cultural Politics. Ed. Elin Diamond. New York: Routledge, 1996.

Muñoz, Jose. "Performing Disidentifications." Disidentifications: Queers o Color and the Performance of Politics. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press,1999. 1-13.

Neal, Larry. "The Black Arts Movement." http://www.english.uiuc.edu/maps/blackarts/documents.htm.

Pagán, Eduardo Obregón. "Chapter 5: Dangerous Fashion." Murder at the Sleepy Lagoon: Zoot Suits, Race, and Riot in Wartime L.A. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2003. 98-125.

Parks, Suzan-Lori. "Black Math." Theatre Journal 57.4 (2005): 576-583.

_____. "An Equation for Black People Onstage. The American Play and Other Works. New York: Theatre Communications Group, 1995.19-22.

Perdomo, Willie. "Nigger-Reecan Blues." Where a Nickel Costs a Dime. New York: W.W. Norton & Co., 1996. 19-21.

Ramírez, Catherine. "Crimes of Fashion: The Pachuca and Chicana Style Politics," Meridians: Feminism, Race, Transnationalism 2:2 (Spring 2002): 1-35.

Rivera, Raquel. "It's Just Begun" & "Whose Hip Hop?" New York Ricans from the Hip Hop Zone. New York: Palgrave, 2003. 49-96.

Sanchez, Sonia.  "a/coltrane/poem." Jazz Poetry Anthology. Eds. Sascha Feinstein & Yusef Komunyakaa. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1991. 183-186.

El Teatro Campesino, "Los Vendidos." The Harcourt Brace Anthology of Drama. 3rd Edition. Ed. W.B. Worthen. New York: Heinle & Heinle, 1999. 1008-1012.      

Troyano, Alina. "The Conquest of Mexico as Seen Through the Eyes of Hernan Cortes' Horse." I, Carmelita Tropicana: Performing Between Cultures. New York: Beacon Press, 2000. 173-76.

_____. Milk of Amnesia. I, Carmelita Tropicana: Performing Between Cultures. New York: Beacon Press, 2000. 52-71.

Valdez, Luis. "Notes on Chicano Theatre." Early Works: Actos, Bernarbe, and Pensamiento Serpentino. Houston: Arte Publico Press, 1994. 6-10.

Requirement and Grading: In addition to regular attendance and active participation, there are THREE ASSIGNMENTS required for this course:

1) Creative Response        25%

2) Performance Analysis        25%

3) Final Project        50%

a.  Presentation component    20%

b.  Written component    30%

1) Creative Response

DUE: During the second week of class, each student will sign up for a day to share their response.

A response to the performance/music/play/dance/style that is in a form other than a written analysis. This could be visual art:  a collage, a drawing, a painting; sculpture or a "prop" or tool or machine; music or sound; food; movement, gesture, or dance; or another written form: poetry, for example. The purpose of this approach is to encourage a different, perhaps more intuitive response to and analysis of the performance. Also, please include a short (less than one page typed, double-spaced) explanation of your response.

2) Performance Analysis

DUE: On the day we discuss the performance you are analyzing.

A 2-3-page, typed, double-spaced paper (around 500-750 words) in which you offer your own original interpretation of a performance form or cultural style studied this semester. Your essay should begin with Observation: What do you read or see or hear or feel? Then expand to Analysis: How does this observation connect to other elements of the performance or cultural artifact or create a pattern? And finally move to: Interpretation: What is significant about this observation? What does it mean? How does it contribute to the total meaning of the performance or cultural product?

3) Final Project

The final project is comprised of the following steps:

1) Proposal Draft (1 page typed abstract)

2) Presentation/Performance (15 min)

3) Completed Written Project (10-15 pp)

This project provides each seminar participant the opportunity to critically investigate and/or creatively produce Black or Latino performance. The project includes both an oral and written component. The oral component can take the form of a scholarly presentation or lecture, an original performance, an art installation, or an interactive workshop. The written component can take the form of a theoretical or historical research paper, an original script accompanied by an introductory "Artist's Statement," or a curatorial essay. We will explore other options as the semester proceeds.

AFR 387D • Divas: Perf Race/Gender/Sexlty

30360 • Fall 2011
Meets W 1100am-200pm DFA 4.104
(also listed as E 389P, MAS 392 )
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What makes a diva a diva?   How are our ideas about performance, spectatorship, space, and capital shaped by the diva figure?  This course explores the central role of the diva—the celebrated, iconic, and supremely skilled female performer—in the shaping and re-imagining of racial, gendered, sexual, national, temporal, and aesthetic categories. Students in this course will theorize the cultural function and constitutive aspects of the diva and will analyze particular performances of a range of divas from the 20th and 21st centuries.

Awards & Honors

Awards & Honors

  • National Association of Chicana/o Studies Book Award Honorable Mention for Selenidad
  • Latin American Studies Association Latina/o Studies Book Award Honorable Mention for Selenidad
  • 2008-9 American Association of University Women Postdoctoral Fellowship
  • 2002 Alfredo Cisneros del Moral Foundation Award for This Side of Skin

Affiliations

Other Departmental and Center Affiliations

  • Department of African and African Diaspora Studies
  • Center for Mexican American Studies
  • Center for Women and Gender Studies
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