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Edmund T. Gordon, Chair 2109 San Jacinto Blvd , Mailcode E3400, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-4362

King Davis

Professor Ph.D., Brandeis, The Florence Heller School

Professor of African and African Diaspora Studies, Director of the Institute for Urban Policy Research and Analysis

Contact

AFR 372F • Race In The Law

30695 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm JES A217A
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This course will give students a foundation for understanding the historical and contemporary race issues in law in the United States. The framework for the course will be historic court cases and statutes spanning the 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries. The cases and statutes studied will involve various matters, including citizenship, segregation, criminal justice, and affirmative action. The course will emphasize identification and critical analysis of discrimination and oppression.

 

The goal of the course will be to examine how race issues are embodied in and interact with law, both from a historical and contemporary perspective. By the end of the course, students should be capable of gaining a rudimentary understanding of and expressing the strengths and weaknesses of legal arguments.

 

At least one short paper in the course will require students to analyze 2012’s Fisher vs. University of Texas affirmative action case.   

Texts (needs to be specific texts, not “course packet” or “TBA)”:

Race, Racism and American Law by Derrick Bell

The New Jim Crow by Michelle Alexander

Race, Crime, and the Law by Randall Kennedy

Simple Justice: The History of Brown v. Board of Education and Black America's Struggle for Equalityby Richard Kluger

AFR 380D • Race/Ethnicity/Gender Policies

30513 • Fall 2013
Meets W 1000am-100pm CLA 2.606
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I. Course Description

This course explores the representations of race, ethnicity, and gender on public policy. The class acquaints students with how public policy develops and the factors which influence its development, interpretation, and implementation. In addition, the course will discuss the history and theoretical perspectives of race, ethnicity, and gender as it relates to policy.

This course will be divided into several overlapping areas of policy including, but not limited to, healthcare, economic justice, immigration, criminal justice, and social welfare. Strong emphasis will be placed on understanding the circumstances that led to particular policies and policy changes through a racial, ethnic, and gendered perspective. Formal methods of critical policy analysis will also be discussed.

II. Course Objectives

At the completion of the course, each student must be able to demonstrate their ability to:

1. Identify and describe current and historical public policies by race, ethnicity, and gender;

2. Critically evaluate the process through which race, ethnicity, and gender become integral parts of public policy development at state, federal, and local levels;

3. Utilize alternative theoretical frameworks for critically analyzing the development and content of public policy;

4. Apply various methods for evaluating and analyzing the differential effects of public policies on different populations;

5. Critically evaluate select policy issues in areas such as health, mental health, criminal justice, education, and income;

6. Develop a plan for influencing and changing public policy to promote social and economic justice.

III. Teaching Methods

The intent of the professors is to stimulate critical thinking, new ideas, alternativesperspectives on critical policy issues, intellectual creativity, and sharing of knowledge and skills with and through the class. To reach these goals, a variety of teaching strategies (didactic, interactive, collaborative) and tools (readings, exams, films, slides, field trips, news articles, debates) will be considered. The expectation is that in all assignments, class participation, presentations, and lectures, that the professors and students will perform at her/his highest level and at a level commensurate with quality graduate study, teaching and scholarship. A major teaching strategy will be to identify (when possible), analyze, and focus on policies and programs that have demonstrated a measure of success in changing(reducing) the social problems that appear to have stimulated their development.

IV. Race, Ethnic, and Gender in Public Policy

Readings could include

 Tuch, S. A. (2011). "Whites’ racial policy attitudes in the 21st century: The continuing significance of racial resentment." The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science 634:134-152 (March). Special issue on “Race, Racial Attitudes, and Stratification Beliefs: Evolving Directions for Research and Policy."

 Weldon, S. L. Inequality and the state: Gender, race, and class in social policy formation

 Lieberman, R. Shaping race policy: The United States in comparative perspective.

 Framework Institute: Outlining a race policy agenda for America

 Spencer, J., Haslewood-Pocsik, I., Smith, E. (2009). Trying to get it right: What prison staff say about implementing race relations policy. Criminology & Criminal Justice, 9(2), 187-206.

 Carmines, E. G., Sniderman, P. M., Easter, B. C. (2011). Race, racial attitudes, and stratification beliefs: Evolving directions for research and policy: On meaning, measurement, and implications of racial resentment. The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science

 Winter, N. J. G., (2008). Dangerous frames: How ideas about race and gender shape public opinion. University of Chicago Press: Chicago, IL.

 Shafer, B. E., & Johnston, R. (2009). The end of Southern exceptionalism: Class, race, andpartisan change in the postwar South. First Harvard University Press: Cambridge, MA.

 Byerly, C. M., Park, Y. J., & Miles, R. D. (2011). Race- and gender-conscious policies: Toward a more egalitarian communications future. Journal of Information Policy, 1, 425-440.

 W.E.B. DuBois, The Souls of Black Folk (any edition).

 Ariela Gross, What Blood Won’t Tell: A History of Race on Trial in America

 Alexander Hamilton, James Madison and John Jay, The Federalist Papers (any edition).

 Ian Haney Lopez, White by Law: The Legal Construction of Race, (New York: New York University Press, 2006).

 Melvin Oliver and Thomas Shapiro, Black Wealth, White Wealth, (New York: Routledge, 2006).

 Edward Telles, Race in Another America: The Significance of Skin Color in Brazil, (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2004).

 Royce, Edward. Poverty and Power

 Abramovitz, Mimi. Under Attack, Fighting Back

AFR 387 • Intro Race And Ethnic Policy

30470 • Spring 2013
Meets T 200pm-500pm BEL 232
(also listed as AMS 391 )
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This course explores the representations of race, ethnicity, and gender on public policy. The class acquaints students with how public policy develops and the factors which influence its development, interpretation, and implementation. In addition, the course will discuss the history and theoretical perspectives of race, ethnicity, and gender as it relates to policy.

This course will be divided into several overlapping areas of policy including, but not limited to, healthcare, economic justice, immigration, criminal justice, and social welfare. Strong emphasis will be placed on understanding the circumstances that led to particular policies and policy changes through a racial, ethnic, and gendered perspective. Formal methods of critical policy analysis will also be discussed.

At the completion of the course, each student must be able to demonstrate their ability to:

  1. Identify and describe current and historical public policies by race, ethnicity, and gender;
  2. Critically evaluate the process through which race, ethnicity, and gender become integral parts of public policy development at state, federal, and local levels;
  3. Utilize alternative theoretical frameworks for critically analyzing the development and content of public policy;
  4. Apply various methods for evaluating and analyzing the differential effects of  public policies on different populations;
  5. Critically evaluate select policy issues in areas such as health, mental health, criminal justice, education, and income;
  6. Develop a plan for influencing and changing public policy to promote social and economic justice

Possible Readings

    • Tuch, S. A.  (2011). "Whites’ racial policy attitudes in the 21st century: The continuing significance of racial resentment." The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science 634:134-152 (March). Special issue on “Race, Racial Attitudes, and Stratification Beliefs: Evolving Directions for Research and Policy."
    • Weldon, S. L. Inequality and the state: Gender, race, and class in social policy formation
    • Lieberman, R. Shaping race policy: The United States in comparative perspective.
    • Framework Institute: Outlining a race policy agenda for America
    • Spencer, J., Haslewood-Pocsik, I., Smith, E. (2009). Trying to get it right: What prison staff say about implementing race relations policy. Criminology & Criminal Justice, 9(2), 187-206.
    • Carmines, E. G., Sniderman, P. M., Easter, B. C. (2011). Race, racial attitudes, and stratification beliefs: Evolving directions for research and policy: On meaning, measurement, and implications of racial resentment. The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science
    • Winter, N. J. G., (2008). Dangerous frames: How ideas about race and gender shape public opinion. University of Chicago Press: Chicago, IL.
    • Shafer, B. E., & Johnston, R.  (2009). The end of Southern exceptionalism: Class, race, and partisan change in the postwar South. First Harvard University Press: Cambridge, MA.
    • Byerly, C. M., Park, Y. J., & Miles, R. D. (2011). Race- and gender-conscious policies: Toward a more egalitarian communications future. Journal of Information Policy, 1, 425-440.
    • Ariela Gross, What Blood Won’t Tell: A History of Race on Trial in America
    • W.E.B. DuBois, The Souls of Black Folk (any edition).
    • Alexander Hamilton, James Madison and John Jay, The Federalist Papers (any edition).
    • Ian Haney Lopez, White by Law: The Legal Construction of Race, (New York: New York University Press, 2006).
    • Melvin Oliver and Thomas Shapiro, Black Wealth, White Wealth, (New York: Routledge, 2006).
    • Edward Telles, Race in Another America: The Significance of Skin Color in Brazil, (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2004).
    • Royce, Edward. Poverty and Power
    • Abramovitz, Mimi. Under Attack, Fighting Back
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