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Anthony Di Fiore, Chair SAC 4.102, Mailcode C3200 78712 • 512-471-4206

Fred Valdez, Jr.

Professor Ph.D., Harvard University

Fred Valdez, Jr.

Contact

  • Phone: (512) 471-0060
  • Office: SAC 4.162
  • Office Hours: Spring 2014: Wednesdays 11 a.m.-12 p.m. and by appointment
  • Campus Mail Code: C3200

Biography

Research interests:
The study of material culture such as ceramic and lithic technologies, settlement patterns and small site studies, and the early emergence of social and political complexity. The history of archaeological investigations in Central America, cultural continuity and transition in Latin America and the American Southwest, Mesoamerican prehistory, and occasional seminars on technological aspects of material culture analyses.

ANT 304 • Intro Archaeol Stds: Prehist

31360 • Fall 2014
Meets MW 900am-1000am GAR 0.102
show description

An introduction to archaeology as a discipline.  Three major themes that deal with issues of the past will be covered:

1.  A brief history of the discipline, changing theories about various aspects of the past, and the role that the reconstructions of the past play in national and/or group identities.

2.  A survey of the development of human culture from its beginnings to the rise of civilizations and proto-historical cultures in most areas of the world.  Prehistoric cultures, archaeological sites, and areas of Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe , and the Pacific will be covered.

3.  Archaeological methods of recovery of information about the past.  Scientific procedures involved in excavation, dating, and preservation of the material record.

ANT 324L • Primitive Technology

31495 • Fall 2014
Meets M 300pm-600pm T5D 1.102
show description

This course will introduce methods/techniques for srifact analysis.  Beyond the theoretical premises of artifact analysis and interpretation will be the hands-on experience of working with an artifact set.  Materials (lithics, ceramics, etc) will be brought into the classroom and students (either individually or as small groups) will undertake an analysis and interpretation of the data set.  The analysis will then be written up as part of an archaeological report that may be published.  Ideally, every student will experience post-excavation requirements of the professional archaeologist: analysis, write-up, and publication (and the range of research for each step).

ANT 453 • Archaeological Analysis

31595 • Fall 2014
Meets MW 1000am-1200pm SAC 4.174
show description

The purpose of this course to provide you (the course participants) with a background to “the kinds” of archaeological analyses that often occur, “what” is involved in archaeological analysis, and “how” archaeological analysis may be approached. This means learning what questions to ask about a field or laboratory project and the steps needed to understand the type of analysis required. From this course you should also become aware of “how to do” an analysis from start (first learning about certain material culture) to completion (doing the analysis and the report writing).

 

 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 304 or Archaeology 301.

 

ANT 383M • Field Projects

31830 • Spring 2014
Meets M 200pm-500pm SAC 5.118
show description

ANT 304 • Intro Archaeol Stds: Prehist

31180-31205 • Fall 2013
Meets MW 900am-1000am WCH 1.120
show description

An introduction to archaeology as a discipline.  Three major themes that deal with issues of the past will be covered:

1.  A brief history of the discipline, changing theories about various aspects of the past, and the role that the reconstructions of the past play in national and/or group identities.

2.  A survey of the development of human culture from its beginnings to the rise of civilizations and proto-historical cultures in most areas of the world.  Prehistoric cultures, archaeological sites, and areas of Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe , and the Pacific will be covered.

3.  Archaeological methods of recovery of information about the past.  Scientific procedures involved in excavation, dating, and preservation of the material record.

ANT 324L • Primitive Technology

31385 • Fall 2013
Meets M 300pm-600pm T5D 1.102
show description

Prehistoric technologies will review various technological developments from earliest prehistoric times into the recent past. The development, process, and methods of stone tool making serves as one example. The control and use of fire, the processes of pottery making, aspects of metallurgy, leatherworking, etc. are all among the topics of lectures and discussions. This course intends to study the development and use of these technologies by hunter-gatherers, early farming communities, as well as the application of these technologies by complex civilizations.

 

ANT 453 • Archaeological Analysis

31495 • Fall 2013
Meets MW 1000am-1200pm SAC 4.174
show description

The purpose of this course to provide you (the course participants) with a

background to “the kinds” of archaeological analyses that often occur, “what” is involved

in archaeological analysis, and “how” archaeological analysis may be approached. This

means learning what questions to ask about a field or laboratory project and the steps

needed to understand the type of analysis required. From this course you should also

become aware of “how to do” an analysis from start (first learning about certain material

culture) to completion (doing the analysis and the report writing).

We will review each of the aspects noted above first by reading chapters detailing

some procedures. The class lectures will elaborate on the various analytical techniques

highlighted.

A schedule of planned topics is presented on a separate (color) page. This serves

primarily as a guide to the order of topics. The actual amount of time spent on a particular

issue or topic will vary according to the needs of the class.

ANT 304 • Intro Archaeol Stds: Prehist

31045 • Fall 2012
Meets MW 1200pm-100pm GAR 0.102
show description

An introduction to archaeology as a discipline.  Three major themes that deal with issues of the past will be covered:

1.  A brief history of the discipline, changing theories about various aspects of the past, and the role that the reconstructions of the past play in national and/or group identities.

2.  A survey of the development of human culture from its beginnings to the rise of civilizations and proto-historical cultures in most areas of the world.  Prehistoric cultures, archaeological sites, and areas of Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe , and the Pacific will be covered.

3.  Archaeological methods of recovery of information about the past.  Scientific procedures involved in excavation, dating, and preservation of the material record.

ANT 324L • Archaeol Excavation Analysis

31142 • Fall 2012
Meets M 300pm-600pm T5D 1.101
show description

The “Artifact Analysis” course will introduce methods/techniques for artifact analysis. Beyond the theoretical premises of artifact analysis and interpretation will be the hands-on experience of working with an artifact set. Materials (lithics, ceramics, etc.) will be brought into the classroom and students (either individually or as small groups) will undertake an analysis and interpretation of the data set. The analysis will then be written up as part of an archaeological report that may be published. Ideally, every student will experience the post-excavation requirements of the professional archaeologist --- analysis, interpretations, write-up, and publication (and the range of research for each step).

ANT 453 • Archaeological Analysis

31260 • Fall 2012
Meets MW 1000am-1200pm SAC 4.174
show description

The purpose of this course to provide you (the course participants) with a background to “the kinds” of archaeological analyses that often occur, “what” is involved in archaeological analysis, and “how” archaeological analysis may be approached. This means learning what questions to ask about a field or laboratory project and the steps needed to understand the type of analysis required. From this course you should also become aware of “how to do” an analysis from start (first learning about certain material culture) to completion (doing the analysis and the report writing).

 

 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 304 or Archaeology 301.

 

ANT F662 • Field Archaeology-Blz

82025 • Summer 2012
Meets
show description

As a student you will have the chance to obtain hands-on experience in general aspects of field archaeology, including excavation, survey, mapping, artifact processing, and artifact analysis. Field techniques training will be supplemented by lectures. Subjects vary but generally cover excavation objectives, lithic analysis, ceramic analysis, osteological analysis and Maya prehistory. All project participants will have the opportunity to participate in a variety of aspects of archaeological fieldwork.

ANT S662 • Field Archaeology-Cent Tx

82145 • Summer 2012
Meets
show description

The principal focus of the course will be instruction in the basic field techniques required both in cultural resource management and in more strictly research settings. Students will learn how to use a total data station, including downloading to a computer. Students will also learn how to lay out a grid and excavate small test pits that will help in evaluating the research potential of an archaeological site. Following this, students will learn the basics of excavation at a hunter-gatherer occupation site. Emphasis will be placed on sampling procedures, excavation techniques, collection of special samples, field laboratory procedures, documentation, and field assessment of findings as these relate to research objectives. There may also be some investigation of historic remains at the site. Upon successful completion of this course, a student should be able to find employment with any cultural resource management firm or institution. Rogers Spring site was partially excavated in 1933 and again in 1974 by the University of Texas. The site has a long record of occupation during the Archaic period, and it had a substantial historic component, though the extent of remaining historic and prehistoric is yet to be determined.

ANT 384M • Mesoamerica

31445 • Spring 2012
Meets M 100pm-400pm SAC 5.124
(also listed as LAS 391 )
show description

This seminar reviews the general history of Maya Civilization with a focus on the developments of society. What are the foundations of Maya Civilization? How did Maya institutions (economics, political organization, etc.) develop and change over time? What did Maya society look like through the various Preclassic segments? Each of these concerns and more will be explored through the lens of prehistoric archaeology reviewing social institutions as well as material culture of the Preclassic era.

ANT 304 • Intro Ary Stds I: Prehist Ary

30905-30930 • Fall 2011
Meets MW 200pm-300pm GAR 0.102
show description

An introduction to archaeology as a discipline.  Three major themes that deal with issues of the past will be covered:

1.  A brief history of the discipline, changing theories about various aspects of the past, and the role that the reconstructions of the past play in national and/or group identities.

2.  A survey of the development of human culture from its beginnings to the rise of civilizations and proto-historical cultures in most areas of the world.  Prehistoric cultures, archaeological sites, and areas of Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe , and the Pacific will be covered.

3.  Archaeological methods of recovery of information about the past.  Scientific procedures involved in excavation, dating, and preservation of the material record.

ANT 453 • Archaeological Analysis

31075 • Fall 2011
Meets MW 1000am-1200pm SAC 4.174
show description

The purpose of this course to provide you (the course participants) with a background to “the kinds” of archaeological analyses that often occur, “what” is involved in archaeological analysis, and “how” archaeological analysis may be approached. This means learning what questions to ask about a field or laboratory project and the steps needed to understand the type of analysis required. From this course you should also become aware of “how to do” an analysis from start (first learning about certain material culture) to completion (doing the analysis and the report writing).

 

 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 304 or Archaeology 301.

 

ANT 360K • Civilization Of The Maya

31080 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm UTC 3.132
(also listed as LAS 324L )
show description

This course reviews Maya civilization and archaeological and art history perspectives. The Maya region is defined and described in order to have a common basis for studying the civilization. Early investigations into theMaya area and a summary of the earliest inhabitants are presented.

ANT F662 • Field Archaeology-Blz

81835 • Summer 2011
Meets
show description

The field school program involves survey, excavation at several Maya sites, and laboratory experience working directly with excavated Maya artifacts. Field techniques, lectures on Maya culture history and instruction concerning artifact analysis are provided during each session.

ANT S662 • Field Archaeology-Cent Tx

81970 • Summer 2011
Meets
show description

The principal focus of the course will be instruction in the basic field techniques required both in cultural resource management and in more strictly research settings. Students will learn how to use a total data station, including downloading to a computer. Students will also learn how to lay out a grid and excavate small test pits that will help in evaluating the research potential of an archaeological site. Following this, students will learn the basics of excavation at a hunter-gatherer occupation site. Emphasis will be placed on sampling procedures, excavation techniques, collection of special samples, field laboratory procedures, documentation, and field assessment of findings as these relate to research objectives. There may also be some investigation of historic remains at the site. Upon successful completion of this course, a student should be able to find employment with any cultural resource management firm or institution. Rogers Spring site was partially excavated in 1933 and again in 1974 by the University of Texas. The site has a long record of occupation during the Archaic period, and it had a substantial historic component, though the extent of remaining historic and prehistoric is yet to be determined.

ANT 383M • Field Projects

31450 • Spring 2011
Meets T 900am-1200pm SAC 4.118
show description

This course will focus on topics related to field archaeology in the greater Mesoamerica area, but not limited to this region.  Specifics should be discussed with Professor Valdez before registering for the course.

ANT 304 • Intro Ary Stds I: Prehist Ary

29975-30000 • Fall 2010
Meets MW 1100am-1200pm WEL 2.246
show description

The anthropological study of prehistory, from human beginnings to the appearance of written records. Case studies to be taken from Old World and New World examples/developments. Lectures will be supplemented by films, slides, demonstrations, and guest lectures.

ANT 453 • Archaeological Analysis

30205 • Fall 2010
Meets MW 100pm-300pm EPS 2.136
show description

The purpose of this course to provide you (the course participants) with a background to “the kinds” of archaeological analyses that often occur, “what” is involved in archaeological analysis, and “how” archaeological analysis may be approached. This means learning what questions to ask about a field or laboratory project and the steps needed to understand the type of analysis required. From this course you should also become aware of “how to do” an analysis from start (first learning about certain material culture) to completion (doing the analysis and the report writing).

 

 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 304 or Archaeology 301.

 

ANT 384M • Mesoamer Socl & Polit Structrs

30265 • Fall 2010
Meets T 100pm-400pm EPS 1.130KA
show description

Graduate seminar with a focus on Mesoamerican/Maya archæology.  This seminar will present a historical background to archæological research in the region(s) under study.  A culture history will be presented in detail providing students with a full understanding of major developments in antiquity.  Significant diagnostic features of the major cultural periods are described.


ANT 662 • Field Archaeology-Cent Tx

81600 • Summer 2010
Meets
show description

The principal focus of the course will be instruction in the basic field techniques required both in cultural resource management and in more strictly research settings. Students will learn how to use a total data station, including downloading to a computer. Students will also learn how to lay out a grid and excavate small test pits that will help in evaluating the research potential of an archaeological site. Following this, students will learn the basics of excavation at a hunter-gatherer occupation site. Emphasis will be placed on sampling procedures, excavation techniques, collection of special samples, field laboratory procedures, documentation, and field assessment of findings as these relate to research objectives. There may also be some investigation of historic remains at the site. Upon successful completion of this course, a student should be able to find employment with any cultural resource management firm or institution. Rogers Spring site was partially excavated in 1933 and again in 1974 by the University of Texas. The site has a long record of occupation during the Archaic period, and it had a substantial historic component, though the extent of remaining historic and prehistoric is yet to be determined.

ANT 304 • Intro Ary Stds I: Prehist Ary

30300-30325 • Fall 2009
Meets MW 100pm-200pm CAL 100
show description

INTRODUCTION TO PREHISTORIC ARCHAEOLOGY

ANTHROPOLOGY 304  **  ARCHAEOLOGY 301

FALL 2009,  MW 1 - 2,  CAL 100

 

Instructor*:         

Fred Valdez    

471-0060   office  EPS 2.114              

 471-5946   lab.

 Hrs.: M 12-1*              

 fredv@mail.utexas.edu

 

 

Teaching Assts*.:        Robyn Dodge

                                    Stacy Drake

                                    Debora Trein

TA contact information (office hours, email, etc.), will be provided at the lab meetings.

                                                Office for TAs:          EPS 2.136

                                                Phone for TAs:          232-4609

 

           

 

           

* Please note that Prof. Valdez and the TAs are available beyond the listed office hours, just ask and make an appointment.

 

 

 

TEXTS:                     Required  World Prehistory and Archaeology by M. Chazan

                                    Chapter assignments are listed on a separate page.

                                   

 

 

COURSE CONTENT: This course will introduce “Prehistoric Archaeology” beginning with a discussion of the types of archaeology in practice today. A brief history of the discipline will be presented as well as summaries of certain field and analytical techniques.

 

The major emphasis of the course will be the study of human prehistory. Included

in the topics of discussion are human origins, the peopling of the New World,

hunters-and-gatherers, plant and animal domestication, the development of

complex societies, and the decline of ancient civilizations.

 

Among the ancient cultures examined in the class are Paleo-Indians of the New

World, the Shang of China, the Anasazi of the American Southwest, the Maya

and Aztecs of Mesoamerica, and the Inca of Peru. Class lectures and readings

will be supplemented by guest lectures, demonstrations/hands-on experience, and

films/slides where appropriate.

 

 

A schedule of planned topics is presented on a separate (bright color) page. This serves primarily as a guide to the order of topics. The actual amount of time spent on a particular issue or culture will vary according to the needs of the class. Given the available time near the semester’s end, we may discuss a case or two of “fantastic” archaeology (for example, the story of Atlantis or the “evidence” for extra-terrestrial presence/influence in ancient times, etc.).

 

COURSE GRADING:  Evaluation in this course will be through five tests. The five (5) tests and please note that there are NO MAKE-UPS since the lowest grade will be dropped after all five (5) tests have been taken. The top four (4) scores are averaged to equal 90% of your grade. IF special circumstances require a “make-up” test, the new test will be evaluated with an automatic 10 point reduction. The 10% balance of the course grade is based upon participation in the lab component section. The lab component may be hands-on activities as well as films, etc. There are NO MAKE-UP Lab classes. If you miss three (3) or more lab sessions, you automatically receive a “F” for the lab component. An “F” for the lab component also means an “F” for the course, regardless of your class average.

 

Tests are multiple choice, true-false, and fill-in-the-blank. The tests are not

cumulative, there is no “final exam” for this course. When tests are returned, any

questions or need of modification to the evaluation must be done within two class

meetings of the returned test. Test results will not be reevaluated at the end of the

semester. Any questions, confusion about the course grading, etc. should be

clarified/settled with Prof. Valdez as soon as possible.


ANTHROPOLOGY 304  --  ARCHAEOLOGY 301

FALL 2009  --  SCHEDULE OF CLASSES*

 

 

Dates                           Topics, Subjects, Tests, Readings                                          

 

Aug. 26 – Sept. 21      Introduction, Hist. of Archaeology, Human Origins, etc.

                                    Read: Chaps. 1, 2, 3, 4

September   7              Labor Day holiday

September 21              Test 1

 

 

 

Sept. 27 – Oct. 12       Early Societies, Neolithic, Domestication, etc.

                                    Read: Chaps. 5, 6, 7

October 12                  Test 2

 

 

 

Oct. 14 – Nov. 2         Farmers, Complex Society, etc.

                                    Read: Chapter 8, 9

November 2                Test 3

 

 

 

Nov. 4 – Nov. 18        Civilizations, State Organizations, etc.

Read: Chaps. 10, 11, 12                                 

November 18              Test 4

 

 

Nov. 23 – Dec. 2         Other Archaeologies, Fantastic Archaeology, etc.

November 25              No Class Meeting

November 26 - 27       Thanksgiving holiday

                                    Read: Chapter 13

December 2                 Test 5

 

 

 

 

*This schedule is an approximation of dates for topics, tests, etc. Any significant changes will be announced as early as possible. Included within the schedule is the showing of films, slides, guest presentations, and any other activities deemed appropriate for this course.

 

 

 

 

ANT 453 • Archaeological Analysis

30530 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 1100-1200 EPS 2.136
show description

ARCHAEOLOGICAL ANALYSIS

ANTHROPOLOGY 453 --- FALL 2009

MWF 11-12, EPS 2.136

 

Instructor:                 

Fred Valdez        

 471-0060  

office  EPS 2.114                              

471-5946   lab.

Hrs.:M 12-1  & by appt.      

fredv@mail.utexas.edu

 

Teaching Asst.:          

Name:  Deanna Riddick          

Office: EPS 2.136

 Phone: 232-4609                    

Hrs.:  Mon. & Wed. 1-2  & by appt.

 Email:  deannariddick@msn.com

 

TEXTS:                     Required   Linking to the Past by K. L. Feder

           

 

COURSE CONTENT:

The purpose of this course to provide you (the course participants) with a background to “the kinds” of archaeological analyses that often occur, “what” is involved in archaeological analysis, and “how” archaeological analysis may be approached. This means learning what questions to ask about a field or laboratory project and the steps needed to understand the type of analysis required. From this course you should also become aware of “how to do” an analysis from start (first learning about certain material culture) to completion (doing the analysis and the report writing).

We will review each of the aspects noted above first by reading chapters detailing some procedures. The class lectures will elaborate on the various analytical techniques highlighted.

A schedule of planned topics is presented on a separate (color) page. This serves primarily as a guide to the order of topics. The actual amount of time spent on a particular issue or topic will vary according to the needs of the class.

 

COURSE GRADING: 

Evaluation in this course will be through five tests and a book report or field/laboratory experience. Five (5) tests are required and please note that there are NO MAKE-UPS. The lowest test score (of the five) will be dropped for the final average, but all five tests must have been taken. The book review/laboratory participation will be evaluated at 10% of the final course grade.

Tests are multiple choice, true-false, and fill-in-the-blank. The tests are not

cumulative, there is no “final exam” for this course. When tests are returned, any

questions or need of modification to the evaluation must be done within two class

meetings of the returned test. Test results will not be reevaluated at the end of the

semester. Any questions, confusion about the course grading, etc. should be

clarified/settled with Prof. Valdez as soon as possible.

 

 

 

ANTHROPOLOGY 453

FALL 2009 --  SCHEDULE OF CLASSES*

 

Dates                           Topics, Subjects, Tests, Readings                                          

 

Aug. 26 - Sept. 14       Introduction, History of Archaeology, Archaeological Record, etc.    Chapters 2, 3, 4

August 28                   No Class Meting

September   7              Labor Day, No Class Meeting

September 14             Test 1

 

 

 

Sept. 16 – Oct. 5         Dating Methods, Survey & Excavation, Social Archaeology

                                    Chapters 5, 6, 7, 8, 12

September 16              No Class Meeting

October 5                   Test 2

 

 

 

Oct. 7 – Oct. 23           Environmental Archaeology, Trade & Exchange, etc.                                                 Chapters 9,

October 23                 Test 3

 

 

 

Oct. 26 – Nov. 16       Subsistence/Diet, Technologies (stone tools), etc.

                                    Chapters 10, 11, 13

November 16             Test 4

 

 

 

Nov. 18 – Dec. 4         Cognitive Archaeology, Explanation in Archaeology, etc.                                                      Class notes only… no assigned readings.             

November 23              Book/Lab. component DUE                                   

November 25              No Class Meeting

November 26-27         Thanksgiving holiday

December 4                Test 5

 

 

 

*This schedule is an approximation of dates for topics, tests, etc. Any significant changes will be announced as early as possible. Included within the schedule is the showing of films, slides, guest presentations, and any other activities deemed appropriate for this course.

 

 

 

 

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