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Lesley Dean-Jones, Chair 2210 Speedway, Mail Code C3400, Austin, TX 78712-1738 • 512-471-5742

Bart A Natoli

Assistant Instructor PhD (in progress), M.Ed., University of Texas at Austin; Colorado State University

Contact

Interests

Ovid, Memory Studies, Pedagogy and the Classics

C C 302 • Introduction To Ancient Rome

33586 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 900am-1000am MEZ 1.306
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Ancient Rome was one of the world’s most pervasively influential cultures, holding sway over the Mediterranean for over 1500 years and providing many of the foundations of Western civilization.  This course provides an introductory-level survey of the history of Rome from its origins in the Iron Age (c. 800 BC) to its sack by the Gothic general Alaric in August 410 CE. The aim is to familiarize learners with the basic aspects of Roman history, culture, and literature.

By the end of CC302, learners will be able to:

  1. Identify names of notable figures in Roman history and Explain why they are notable.
  2. Identify dates of seminal events in Roman history and Explain their significance.
  3. Identify locations in Roman history on a map.
  4. Describe and Explain major aspects of Roman society and culture.
  5. Identify and Describe methods of studying Roman culture and Evaluate the effectiveness of each.

Class time will be devoted to lectures and class discussions of various cultural, historical, material, and literary contexts of Latin, with special emphasis paid to topics of learner interest.  Learners should expect homework assignments for each class meeting as well as weekly quizzes.  Final grades will be determined by quizzes; a group project; 3 exams; and a final exam.

This course carries the Global Cultures flag.

LAT 506 • First-Year Latin I

33665 • Fall 2013
Meets MTWTHF 100pm-200pm JES A216A
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Latin is one of the basic languages to learn for better command of English; over 65% of the English vocabulary is based on Latin. Latin 506 will acquaint you with the principal forms and structures of Latin in an interesting and challenging manner. The aim is to proceed to the reading of connected Latin passages as soon as possible and to be able to identify grammatical and syntactical functions of Latin sentences in context.

By the end of Latin 506, learners will be able to:

  1. Define basic Latin vocabulary (appx. 1000 words)

  2. Identify the grammatical forms of Latin words

  3. Identify the syntactical functions of Latin words

  4. Analyze the syntax of a Latin sentence.

  5. Use different strategies to translate Latin.

Class time will be devoted to discussion of and practice with Latin grammatical and syntactical topics. There will also be regular class discussions of the historical and literary contexts of Latin, with special emphasis paid to topics of learner interest.  Learners should expect homework assignments for each class meeting as well as weekly quizzes.  Final grades will be determined by attendance and class participation; homework; quizzes; 3 tests; and a final exam. 

LAT S312K • Intermediate Latin II

82890 • Summer 2013
Meets MTWTHF 1000am-1130am CBA 4.338
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This course is a complement to Latin 311 and is the final course in the beginning-intermediate Latin sequence.  In Latin 312, students will read selections from Vergil’s Aeneid.   The aim of the class is to develop students’ Latin reading and comprehension skills through careful translation of assigned and unseen passages; to review the basic morphology and syntax learned in Latin 506 and Latin 507 while introducing students to new forms and syntax as they arise; to enhance command of Latin vocabulary, including poetic diction; to introduce students to the literary and historical context of Vergil’s Aeneid; and to teach students the basic features of Latin meter.

 

Class time will be devoted to the translation of assigned Latin passages, ranging from 5-10 lines early in the semester to about 25 lines by the end of the semester.  Students will be expected to identify and explain the morphology and syntax of the assigned Latin.  They will be expected to scan a dactylic hexameter and will practice scansion in class throughout the semester.  There will also be regular class discussions of the historical context and literary features of Vergil’s poem.  Students should expect homework assignments for each class meeting as well as regular quizzes.  Final grades will be determined by attendance and class participation; homework; quizzes; and 4 tests. There is no final exam.

C C F306M • Intro To Medcl & Scientif Term

82755 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTHF 830am-1000am GSB 2.122
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This course provides a systematic introduction to medical and scientific terminology. Taking it will enable you to acquire a working knowledge of the Greek and Latin roots, prefixes and suffixes which provide the key to understanding “medspeak” – the highly specialized language of healthcare. You will learn principles of word analysis, synthesis, and pronunciation; and to help you master this material and understand its origins, we will look at relevant aspects of ancient Greek and Roman medico-scientific culture. There are no prerequisites. Although we will be working with Latin and Greek terms, no background knowledge of either language is required or assumed.

 

Course Website: http://306medterms.weebly.com/

LAT 601C • Beginning Latin

33385 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am BEN 1.102
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Latin is one of the basic languages to learn for better command of English; over 65% of the English vocabulary is based on Latin. Latin 601C will acquaint you with the principal forms and structures of Latin in an interesting and challenging manner. The aim is to proceed to the reading of connected Latin passages as soon as possible and to be able to identify grammatical and syntactical functions of Latin sentences in context.  The Course goals are as follows:

Learners will be able to:

         1. Define basic Latin vocabulary (appx. 1000 words)

         2. Identify the grammatical forms of Latin words

         3. Identify the syntactical functions of Latin words

         4. Use different strategies to translate Latin

Remember, this is an intensive, accelerated class that will cover the same amount of material as Latin 506 and 507 combined.  As a result, students must set aside a substantial amount of time outside of class to review and thoroughly digest the concepts practiced in class.  Therefore, please plan accordingly.

Evaluation will take forms varying from examinations to participation (for more, see below). There will be daily assignments online and from the corresponding workbook.  As time permits, we will examine more abstract ideas surrounding Latin literature, history and archaeology.

 

Evaluation:  Class participation, quizzes, midterm tests, participation, a group project and a final exam.

 

Class Website: http://latin601.weebly.com

LAT 311 • Intermediate Latin I

33320 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm GAR 1.134
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This course is a continuation of Latin 507 (or 601C).  In Latin 311, students read Book 3 of Caesar’s Civil War.   The aim of the course is to develop students’ Latin reading and comprehension skills through careful translation of assigned and unseen passages; to review the basic morphology and syntax learned in Latin 506 and 507 while introducing students to new forms and syntax as they arise; to build command of basic Latin vocabulary; and to introduce students to the literary and historical context of Caesar’s narrative.

Class time will be devoted to the translation of assigned Latin passages, ranging from 8-10 lines early in the semester to about 25 lines by the end of the semester.  Students will be expected to identify and explain the morphology and syntax of assigned readings.  There will also be regular class discussions of the historical context and literary features of Caesar’s narrative.  Students should expect homework assignments for each class meeting as well as regular quizzes, both announced and unannounced.  Final grades will be determined by attendance and class participation; quizzes; midterm exams; and a comprehensive final exam. 

Latin 311 partially fulfills the foreign language requirement.  A grade of C or higher is required to advance to Latin 312.

The completion of Latin 507 or 601C with a grade of C or higher is a prerequisite for Latin 311.

 

Textbooks

Kennedy, Caesar: De Bello Civile III, 1st ed. (Bristol, 2002).  ISBN 185399636X

Bennett, New Latin Grammar, 1st ed.,  (Bolchazy-Carducci, 2000).  ISBN 978-0-86516-262-7

Traupman, New College Latin and English Dictionary, 3rd ed. (Bantam, 2007)  ISBN 978-0-553-59012-8

LAT 311 • Intermediate Latin I

33685 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 900am-1000am MEZ 1.210
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This course is a continuation of Latin 507. It has three main aims: to develop proficiency in reading Latin, to strengthen command of Latin grammar and vocabulary, and to explore key features of Roman life and culture. Students read extended selections from Vergil’s Aeneid in the original Latin; and classroom discussion addresses cultural and historical issues while also reviewing grammar, stylistics, and poetics.

Grades will be based on participation, quizzes, written work, midterm tests, and a final exam.

Students earning a C or better may advance to LAT 312 Intermediate Latin II, where they will read selections from Cicero and other authors.

Prerequisite: LAT 507 or equivalent (i.e. first-year beginning Latin).

Latin 311 may be counted as partially fulfilling the foreign language requirement, or the General Culture requirement, or as an elective.

LAT 601C • Beginning Latin

32536 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 900am-1000am WAG 308
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This course offers a complete introduction to the elements of Latin for highly motivated students in all disciplines.  The course covers all the material covered in two semesters in the regular first-year sequence of Latin 506-507.  It has proved  especially valuable for graduate students in English literature, comparative literature, or in Romance and other languages, and for undergraduate students with previous experience in the study of foreign languages.

Prerequisite:  There are no prerequisite. Note: This course may not be counted by students offering two or more admission units or any previous college credit in Latin.

This course may be counted as partially fulfilling the foreign language requirement, or the General Culture requirement, or as an elective.

Requirements:  Class participation, quizzes, midterm tests, and a final exam.

LAT 506 • First-Year Latin I

82435 • Summer 2010
Meets MTWTHF 830am-1000am WAG 308
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LAT 506: First-Year Latin I

This course is an introduction to Latin, the language of ancient Rome and famous writers like Caesar, Cicero, Vergil, and St. Augustine. Latin is also an excellent way to improve your command of other languages: Latin is the source of over 60% of English vocabulary, and also the ancestor of all the “Romance” languages of Europe, including French, Italian, Portuguese, and Spanish.

 

Latin 506 introduces basic grammar and vocabulary in an interesting and challenging format, through reading selections from a wide range of Roman authors and exploring aspects of Roman life and culture.  By the end of the semester, students are reading excerpts from famous works and ready to continue into Latin 507.

 

The course covers chapters 1-25 of Wheelock’s Latin and also selected readings from 38 Latin Stories. There will be daily assignments, regular quizzes, midterm tests, and a final exam.

 

Prerequisites: None. Note: This course may not be counted by students offering two or more admission units or any previous college credit in Latin. 

 

Latin 506 may be counted as partially fulfilling the foreign language requirement, or the General Culture requirement, or as an elective. 

 

Requirements: Class participation, homework, quizzes, midterm tests, and  a final exam.

 

Students earning a 75 or better may advance to Latin 507: First-Year Latin II, where they will read selections from Caesar and other authors. 

 

Texts:

Wheelock, Wheelock's Latin (Harper 6h edition)

Groton & May, 38 Latin Stories (Bolchazy)

Goldman & Szymanski, English Grammar for Students of Latin (Olivia & Hill) (optional)

LAT 506 • First-Year Latin I

32865 • Spring 2010
Meets MTWTHF 1000-1100 UTC 3.120
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See attachment.

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