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Lesley Dean-Jones, Chair 2210 Speedway, Mail Code C3400, Austin, TX 78712-1738 • 512-471-5742

Cristina Carusi

Assistant Professor PhD 2006, Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa

Cristina Carusi

Contact

Biography

Before joining the Department of Classics at UT Austin, Cristina Carusi (PhD 2006, Scuola Normale Superiore) held research appointments in Greek history at the Scuola Normale Superiore of Pisa, at the Italian Archaeological School at Athens, and at the University of Parma. She held research fellowships in France (École Normale Supérieure), Spain (Casa de Vélazquez), and US (Center for Hellenic Studies, Washington DC).

Her research interests include classical and Hellenistic Greece, epigraphy, and documentary papyrology, with a special focus on institutions, law, and economy. In addition to several articles and entries in international volumes and journals, her latest publications include a book on the production, commerce and taxation of salt in the Greek world (Edipuglia 2008) and a co-edited volume on the Athenian grain-tax law of 374/3 (ETS 2010). She is currently working on a comprehensive study of the legal and economic aspects of public building in classical Athens, with particular attention to epigraphic sources.

Interests

Greek History; Greek Epigraphy; Law, Economy, and Institutions of Greek City-States; Salt Studies; Documentary Papyrology

AHC 319 • Ancient Mediterranean World

32205-32220 • Spring 2015
Meets MW 1200pm-100pm WEL 2.304
(also listed as C C 319D, HIS 319D )
show description

"Ancient Mediterranean World" surveys the major civilizations of Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece and Italy from the dawn of the city around 3000 BC through the collapse of the Western Roman Empire in the 400s AD. Beyond providing a basic historical framework, the course explores the surprising ways in which the various civilizations of the area influenced one another culturally. We will examine interactions between Egyptians, Sumerians, Hittites, Hebrews, Persians, Greeks and Romans, among others. Students will also learn about the different types of evidence, both literary and archaeological, on which knowledge of the ancient world is based. There are two lectures and one discussion section per week.

This course carries the Global Cultures flag.

AHC 325 • History Of Greece To 146 Bc

32235-32245 • Spring 2015
Meets MW 1000am-1100am WAG 101
(also listed as C C 354D, HIS 354D )
show description

This course covers Greek history from the fall of Athens in 404 BC through Greece's loss of independence to Rome some 250 years later--an era defined by the figure of Alexander the Great.Classes will focus on five successive periods: (1) the decline of Greece's independent city-states; (2) their subordination to a Greek-speaking Macedonia under Philip II and his son, Alexander the Great; (3) Alexander's conquest of the Persian Empire; (4) the resulting Hellenistic Age of Greek kingdoms in Egypt, Syria and Macedonia; and (5) Rome's absorption of both Macedonia and mainland Greece.The course will devote roughly equal time to covering major events and personalities, exploring key developments in culture and society, and examining the various types of evidence available for the era.  There will be two hours of lecture and one hour of discussion each week.

This course carries a Global Cultures flag.

C C 319D • Ancient Mediterranean World

32380-32395 • Spring 2015
Meets MW 1200pm-100pm WEL 2.304
(also listed as AHC 319, HIS 319D )
show description

"Ancient Mediterranean World" surveys the major civilizations of Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece and Italy from the dawn of the city around 3000 BC through the collapse of the Western Roman Empire in the 400s AD. Beyond providing a basic historical framework, the course explores the surprising ways in which the various civilizations of the area influenced one another culturally. We will examine interactions between Egyptians, Sumerians, Hittites, Hebrews, Persians, Greeks and Romans, among others. Students will also learn about the different types of evidence, both literary and archaeological, on which knowledge of the ancient world is based. There are two lectures and one discussion section per week.

This course carries the Global Cultures flag.

C C 354D • History Of Greece To 146 Bc

32475-32485 • Spring 2015
Meets MW 1000am-1100am WAG 101
(also listed as AHC 325, HIS 354D )
show description

This course covers Greek history from the fall of Athens in 404 BC through Greece's loss of independence to Rome some 250 years later--an era defined by the figure of Alexander the Great.Classes will focus on five successive periods: (1) the decline of Greece's independent city-states; (2) their subordination to a Greek-speaking Macedonia under Philip II and his son, Alexander the Great; (3) Alexander's conquest of the Persian Empire; (4) the resulting Hellenistic Age of Greek kingdoms in Egypt, Syria and Macedonia; and (5) Rome's absorption of both Macedonia and mainland Greece.The course will devote roughly equal time to covering major events and personalities, exploring key developments in culture and society, and examining the various types of evidence available for the era.  There will be two hours of lecture and one hour of discussion each week.

This course carries a Global Cultures flag.

AHC 325 • Hist Grc To End Pelopon War

33115-33120 • Fall 2014
Meets MW 100pm-200pm WAG 101
(also listed as C C 354C, HIS 354C )
show description

This course covers essential developments in Greek history during the Archaic and Early Classical Periods (ca. 800-400 B.C.). Emphasis will be divided between political/military history and ancient Greek society and culture (e.g. gender and class, religion, economy, performance). The course will consist of two hours of lecture per week plus a required one-hour discussion section. Particular attention will be paid to the interpretation of ancient sources, both written works and the archaeological remains.

This course carries a Global Cultures flag.

C C 354C • Hist Grc To End Pelopon War

33340-33350 • Fall 2014
Meets MW 100pm-200pm WAG 101
(also listed as AHC 325, HIS 354C )
show description

This course covers essential developments in Greek history during the Archaic and Early Classical Periods (ca. 800-400 B.C.). Emphasis will be divided between political/military history and ancient Greek society and culture (e.g. gender and class, religion, economy, performance). The course will consist of two hours of lecture per week plus a required one-hour discussion section. Particular attention will be paid to the interpretation of ancient sources, both written works and the archaeological remains.

This course carries a Global Cultures flag.

GK 365 • Classical Historiog & Gk Prose

33490 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm WAG 112
(also listed as GK 385 )
show description

Classical Historiography and Greek Prose

The main goal of this course is to improve students’ facility in reading and understanding Greek. In order to achieve this goal, we will read, translate, and analyze a representative selection of Classical historiography (Herodotus, Thucydides, and Xenophon) and Greek prose in general (Old Oligarch, Lysias, Plato, Demosthenes, Isocrates, Polybius, Plutarch, etc.).

In the process, we will examine points of syntax and morphology and track the development and diversity of prose style, with particular attention to the prose of the classical historiographers. We will also discuss the different ways in which the main historiographers approached the task of writing history.

Students will have written exercises, oral presentations, and three translation tests. Students in GK 365 will have some secondary reading and additional writing assignments, while students in GK 385 will have additional Greek reading.

Texts:

Demosthenes, Third Philippic

Herodotus, Histories

Isocrates, Panegyric

Lysias, On the murder of Erathostenes

Old Oligarch, Constitution of the Athenians

Plato, Apology

Plutarch, Life of Pericles

Polybius, Histories

Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War

Xenophon, Hellenica and Memorabilia

Grading Policy:

GK 365: translation tests 55%, term paper 25%, class participation and exercises 20%

GK 385: translation tests 80%, class participation and exercises 20%

GK 385 • Classical Historiog & Gk Prose

33520 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm WAG 112
(also listed as GK 365 )
show description

Classical Historiography and Greek Prose

The main goal of this course is to improve students’ facility in reading and understanding Greek. In order to achieve this goal, we will read, translate, and analyze a representative selection of Classical historiography (Herodotus, Thucydides, and Xenophon) and Greek prose in general (Old Oligarch, Lysias, Plato, Demosthenes, Isocrates, Polybius, Plutarch, etc.).

In the process, we will examine points of syntax and morphology and track the development and diversity of prose style, with particular attention to the prose of the classical historiographers. We will also discuss the different ways in which the main historiographers approached the task of writing history.

Students will have written exercises, oral presentations, and three translation tests. Students in GK 365 will have some secondary reading and additional writing assignments, while students in GK 385 will have additional Greek reading.

Texts:

Demosthenes, Third Philippic

Herodotus, Histories

Isocrates, Panegyric

Lysias, On the murder of Erathostenes

Old Oligarch, Constitution of the Athenians

Plato, Apology

Plutarch, Life of Pericles

Polybius, Histories

Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War

Xenophon, Hellenica and Memorabilia

Grading Policy:

GK 365: translation tests 55%, term paper 25%, class participation and exercises 20%

GK 385: translation tests 80%, class participation and exercises 20%

AHC 325 • History Of Greece To 146 Bc

33485-33495 • Spring 2014
Meets MW 1000am-1100am WAG 101
(also listed as C C 354D, EUS 346, HIS 354D )
show description

This course covers Greek history from the fall of Athens in 404 BC through Greece's loss of independence to Rome some 250 years later--an era defined by the figure of Alexander the Great.Classes will focus on five successive periods: (1) the decline of Greece's independent city-states; (2) their subordination to a Greek-speaking Macedonia under Philip II and his son, Alexander the Great; (3) Alexander's conquest of the Persian Empire; (4) the resulting Hellenistic Age of Greek kingdoms in Egypt, Syria and Macedonia; and (5) Rome's absorption of both Macedonia and mainland Greece.The course will devote roughly equal time to covering major events and personalities, exploring key developments in culture and society, and examining the various types of evidence available for the era.  There will be two hours of lecture and one hour of discussion each week.

This course carries a Global Cultures flag.

C C 354D • History Of Greece To 146 Bc

33710-33720 • Spring 2014
Meets MW 1000am-1100am WAG 101
(also listed as AHC 325, EUS 346, HIS 354D )
show description

This course covers Greek history from the fall of Athens in 404 BC through Greece's loss of independence to Rome some 250 years later--an era defined by the figure of Alexander the Great.Classes will focus on five successive periods: (1) the decline of Greece's independent city-states; (2) their subordination to a Greek-speaking Macedonia under Philip II and his son, Alexander the Great; (3) Alexander's conquest of the Persian Empire; (4) the resulting Hellenistic Age of Greek kingdoms in Egypt, Syria and Macedonia; and (5) Rome's absorption of both Macedonia and mainland Greece.The course will devote roughly equal time to covering major events and personalities, exploring key developments in culture and society, and examining the various types of evidence available for the era.  There will be two hours of lecture and one hour of discussion each week.

This course carries a Global Cultures flag.

GK 324 • Herodotus

33851 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm WAG 112
show description

In this course we will read The Histories of Herodotus of Halicarnassus, the Father of History.

Thanks to a selection of the most significant passages of his work, we will follow Herodotus through his travels to Lydia, Persia, Egypt, Libya, Scythia, and Greece, up to the culmination of the Persian Wars; we will meet, among others, with Croesus, Darius, Xerxes, Miltiades, Leonidas, and Themistocles; we will appreciate Herodotus’ intellectual curiosity and rational skepticism - maybe inherited by the philosophers of his native Ionia – and his ability of consummate story-teller; we will enjoy the fruits of his own first-hand enquiry, his own historie; and, to put it in Herodotus’ own words, we will commit ourselves “to ensure that the passage of time does not erase the past from men’s minds and that the great and astonishing achievements of both Greeks and barbaroi do not go unsung”.

Grading:

  • Homework and class activities 25%
  • Tests 30%
  • Midterm 20%
  • Final 25%

Texts:

A.L. Barbour and M.O. Drinkwater, Selections from Herodotus, 2nd edition, University of Oklahoma Press, ISBN 0-8061-1427-4.

AHC 325 • Hist Grc To End Pelopon War

33150-33165 • Fall 2013
Meets MW 100pm-200pm WAG 101
(also listed as C C 354C, HIS 354C )
show description

This course covers essential developments in Greek history during the Archaic and Early Classical Periods (ca. 800-400 B.C.). Emphasis will be divided between political/military history and ancient Greek society and culture (e.g. gender and class, religion, economy, performance). The course will consist of two hours of lecture per week plus a required one-hour discussion section. Particular attention will be paid to the interpretation of ancient sources, both written works and the archaeological remains.

This course carries a Global Cultures flag.

AHC 378 • Economies Of The Greek Cities

33175 • Fall 2013
Meets MW 330pm-500pm CBA 4.346
show description

Over the past few decades the study of the ancient economy has developed into one of the most intriguing and promising research fields in classical studies. Thanks to new studies of ancient documents and archaeological evidence, and new theoretical frameworks, we can now reconstruct more fully many important sectors of the private and public economy of the ancient Greek world, including agriculture, craft industries, mining, building, trade, coinage, and taxation.

This course will explore these and related topics within the context of the Greek city from the archaic age to the Hellenistic period, with special attention to classical Athens.

The course will be conducted as a seminar with student participation central to its success.  We will discuss key topics using the full range of ancient evidence, from literary and epigraphic sources to archaeological remains. Drawing on recent scholarship, we will also explore research methodology and theoretical problems raised by the study of the ancient economy.

This course carries the Writing flag and the Independent Inquiry flag.

L. Migeotte, The Economy of the Greek Cities, University of California Press, ISBN: 9780520253667

M.M. Austin & P. Vidal-Naquet, Economic and Social History of Ancient Greece, University of California Press, ISBN: 9780520042674.

C C 354C • Hist Grc To End Pelopon War

33350-33365 • Fall 2013
Meets MW 100pm-200pm WAG 101
(also listed as AHC 325, HIS 354C )
show description

This course covers essential developments in Greek history during the Archaic and Early Classical Periods (ca. 800-400 B.C.). Emphasis will be divided between political/military history and ancient Greek society and culture (e.g. gender and class, religion, economy, performance). The course will consist of two hours of lecture per week plus a required one-hour discussion section. Particular attention will be paid to the interpretation of ancient sources, both written works and the archaeological remains.

This course carries a Global Cultures flag.

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