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Lesley Dean-Jones, Chair 2210 Speedway, Mail Code C3400, Austin, TX 78712-1738 • 512-471-5742

Richard Fernando Buxton

Lecturer PhD 2010, University of Washington

Richard Fernando Buxton

Contact

  • Phone: (512) 471-8220
  • Office: WAG 107
  • Office Hours: TTh 11:00am-12:00pm, W 2:00pm-3:00pm, or by appointment
  • Campus Mail Code: C3400

Interests

Greek historiography, Classical prose, social conflict, economy and numismatics, the New Historicism

AHC 319 • Ancient Mediterranean World

33455-33470 • Spring 2014
Meets MW 1200pm-100pm WAG 201
(also listed as C C 319D, HIS 319D )
show description

"Ancient Mediterranean World" surveys the major civilizations of Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece and Italy from the dawn of the city around 3000 BC through the collapse of the Western Roman Empire in the 400s AD. Beyond providing a basic historical framework, the course explores the surprising ways in which the various civilizations of the area influenced one another culturally. We will examine interactions between Egyptians, Sumerians, Hittites, Hebrews, Persians, Greeks and Romans, among others. Students will also learn about the different types of evidence, both literary and archaeological, on which knowledge of the ancient world is based. There are two lectures and one discussion section per week.

This course carries the Global Cultures flag.

Texts:

D. Brendan Nagle and S.M.Burstein, The Ancient World: A Social and Cultural History (most recent edition, 6th?). Prentice Hall ISBN-13: 9780131930414

D. Brendan Nagle and S.M.Burstein, The Ancient World: Readings in Social and Cultural History (most recent edition, 3rd?) Prentice Hall ISBN-13: 9780131930407

John Haywood and Simon Hall, The Penguin Historical Atlas of Ancient Civilizations (Penguin Historical Atlas) ISBN 9780141014487

C C 319D • Ancient Mediterranean World

33630-33645 • Spring 2014
Meets MW 1200pm-100pm WAG 201
(also listed as AHC 319, HIS 319D )
show description

"Ancient Mediterranean World" surveys the major civilizations of Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece and Italy from the dawn of the city around 3000 BC through the collapse of the Western Roman Empire in the 400s AD. Beyond providing a basic historical framework, the course explores the surprising ways in which the various civilizations of the area influenced one another culturally. We will examine interactions between Egyptians, Sumerians, Hittites, Hebrews, Persians, Greeks and Romans, among others. Students will also learn about the different types of evidence, both literary and archaeological, on which knowledge of the ancient world is based. There are two lectures and one discussion section per week.

This course carries the Global Cultures flag.

Texts:

D. Brendan Nagle and S.M.Burstein, The Ancient World: A Social and Cultural History (most recent edition, 6th?). Prentice Hall ISBN-13: 9780131930414

D. Brendan Nagle and S.M.Burstein, The Ancient World: Readings in Social and Cultural History (most recent edition, 3rd?) Prentice Hall ISBN-13: 9780131930407

John Haywood and Simon Hall, The Penguin Historical Atlas of Ancient Civilizations (Penguin Historical Atlas) ISBN 9780141014487

GK 507 • First-Year Greek II

33825 • Spring 2014
Meets MTWTHF 1000am-1100am WAG 10
show description

This course continues the introduction to reading Ancient Greek begun in Greek 506. In the first ten weeks, we'll review and complete the study of basic grammar using Crosby and Schaeffer's Introduction to Greek. Then we'll spend the rest of the semester reading selections from Herodotus, Plato, and other authors. There will be daily assignments on grammar, vocabulary, and translation. Regular attendance and active participation are essential.

Grades will be based on homework, participation, and weekly quizzes (25%), three tests (45%), and a final exam (30%).

Prerequisite: Greek 506 or equivalent (i.e. one semester of Greek).

This course can be counted for partial fulfillment of foreign language requirements.

AHC 319 • Ancient Mediterranean World

33140 • Fall 2013
Meets MW 1000am-1100am UTC 3.110
(also listed as C C 319D, HIS 319D )
show description

"Ancient Mediterranean World" surveys the major civilizations of Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece and Italy from the dawn of the city around 3000 BC through the collapse of the Western Roman Empire in the 400s AD. Beyond providing a basic historical framework, the course explores the surprising ways in which the various civilizations of the area influenced one another culturally. We will examine interactions between Egyptians, Sumerians, Hittites, Hebrews, Persians, Greeks and Romans, among others. Students will also learn about the different types of evidence, both literary and archaeological, on which knowledge of the ancient world is based. There are two lectures and one discussion section per week.

This course carries the Global Cultures flag.

Texts:

D. Brendan Nagle and S.M.Burstein, The Ancient World: A Social and Cultural History (most recent edition, 6th?). Prentice Hall ISBN-13: 9780131930414

D. Brendan Nagle and S.M.Burstein, The Ancient World: Readings in Social and Cultural History (most recent edition, 3rd?) Prentice Hall ISBN-13: 9780131930407

John Haywood and Simon Hall, The Penguin Historical Atlas of Ancient Civilizations (Penguin Historical Atlas) ISBN 9780141014487

C C 319D • Ancient Mediterranean World

33305 • Fall 2013
Meets MW 1000am-1100am UTC 3.110
(also listed as AHC 319, HIS 319D )
show description

"Ancient Mediterranean World" surveys the major civilizations of Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece and Italy from the dawn of the city around 3000 BC through the collapse of the Western Roman Empire in the 400s AD. Beyond providing a basic historical framework, the course explores the surprising ways in which the various civilizations of the area influenced one another culturally. We will examine interactions between Egyptians, Sumerians, Hittites, Hebrews, Persians, Greeks and Romans, among others. Students will also learn about the different types of evidence, both literary and archaeological, on which knowledge of the ancient world is based. There are two lectures and one discussion section per week.

This course carries the Global Cultures flag.

Texts:

D. Brendan Nagle and S.M.Burstein, The Ancient World: A Social and Cultural History (most recent edition, 6th?). Prentice Hall ISBN-13: 9780131930414

D. Brendan Nagle and S.M.Burstein, The Ancient World: Readings in Social and Cultural History (most recent edition, 3rd?) Prentice Hall ISBN-13: 9780131930407

John Haywood and Simon Hall, The Penguin Historical Atlas of Ancient Civilizations (Penguin Historical Atlas) ISBN 9780141014487

LAT 311 • Intermediate Latin I

33695 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm GAR 1.134
show description

This course is a continuation of Latin 507 (or 601C).  In Latin 311, students read Book 3 of Caesar’s Civil War.   The aim of the course is to develop students’ Latin reading and comprehension skills through careful translation of assigned and unseen passages; to review the basic morphology and syntax learned in Latin 506 and 507 while introducing students to new forms and syntax as they arise; to build command of basic Latin vocabulary; and to introduce students to the literary and historical context of Caesar’s narrative.

Class time will be devoted to the translation of assigned Latin passages, ranging from 8-10 lines early in the semester to about 25 lines by the end of the semester.  Students will be expected to identify and explain the morphology and syntax of assigned readings.  There will also be regular class discussions of the historical context and literary features of Caesar’s narrative.  Students should expect homework assignments for each class meeting as well as regular quizzes, both announced and unannounced.  Final grades will be determined by attendance and class participation; quizzes; midterm exams; and a comprehensive final exam. 

Latin 311 partially fulfills the foreign language requirement.  A grade of C or higher is required to advance to Latin 312.

The completion of Latin 507 or 601C with a grade of C or higher is a prerequisite for Latin 311.

 

Textbooks

Kennedy, Caesar: De Bello Civile III, 1st ed. (Bristol, 2002).  ISBN 185399636X

Bennett, New Latin Grammar, 1st ed.,  (Bolchazy-Carducci, 2000).  ISBN 978-0-86516-262-7

Traupman, New College Latin and English Dictionary, 3rd ed. (Bantam, 2007)  ISBN 978-0-553-59012-8

LAT 312K • Intermediate Latin II

33710 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm WAG 308
show description

This course is a complement to Latin 311 and is the final course in the beginning-intermediate Latin sequence.  In Latin 312, students will read selections from Vergil’s Aeneid.   The aim of the class is to develop students’ Latin reading and comprehension skills through careful translation of assigned and unseen passages; to review the basic morphology and syntax learned in Latin 506 and Latin 507 while introducing students to new forms and syntax as they arise; to enhance command of Latin vocabulary, including poetic diction; to introduce students to the literary and historical context of Vergil’s Aeneid; and to teach students the basic features of Latin meter.

Class time will be devoted to the translation of assigned Latin passages, ranging from 8-10 lines early in the semester to about 30 lines by the end of the semester.  Students will be expected to identify and explain the morphology and syntax of the assigned Latin.  They will be expected to be able to scan a dactylic hexameter and will practice scansion in class throughout the semester.  There will also be regular class discussions of the historical context and literary features of Vergil’s poem.  Students should expect homework assignments for each class meeting as well as regular quizzes, both announced and unannounced.  Final grades will be determined by attendance and class participation; quizzes; midterm exams; and a comprehensive final exam.  

Latin 312 fulfills the foreign language requirement. A grade of C or higher is required to advance to Latin 322.

The completion of 311 with a grade of C or higher is a prerequisite for Latin 312

 

Textbooks

Pharr, Aeneid Books I-VI, 1st ed. (Bolchazy-Carducci 1998).  ISBN 978-0-86516-421-5

Bennett, New Latin Grammar, 1st ed.,  (Bolchazy-Carducci, 2000).  ISBN 978-0-86516-262-7

AHC 319 • Ancient Mediterranean World

33005-33020 • Spring 2013
Meets MW 1200pm-100pm WAG 201
(also listed as C C 319D, HIS 319D )
show description

"Ancient Mediterranean World" surveys the major civilizations of Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece and Italy from the dawn of the city around 3000 BC through the collapse of the Western Roman Empire in the fifth century AD. Beyond providing a basic historical framework, the course explores the surprising ways in which the various peoples of the area influenced one another culturally--including Egyptians, Babylonians, Hittites, Hebrews, Persians, Greeks and Romans. Students will also learn about the different types of evidence, both literary and archaeological, on which knowledge of the ancient world is based. There are two lectures and one discussion section per week.Textbooks:Mathisen, Ancient Mediterranean Civilizations (Oxford, 2012).Nagle & Burstein, The Ancient World: Readings, 4th ed. (Prentice Hall 2010).

AHC 325 • History Of Greece To 146 Bc

33030-33045 • Spring 2013
Meets MW 1000am-1100am WAG 101
(also listed as C C 354D, EUS 346, HIS 354D )
show description

This course covers Greek history from the fall of Athens in 404 BC through Greece's loss of independence to Rome some 250 years later--an era defined by the figure of Alexander the Great. Classes will focus on five successive periods: (1) the decline of Greece's independent city-states; (2) their subordination to a Greek-speaking Macedonia under Philip II and his son, Alexander the Great; (3) Alexander's conquest of the Persian Empire; (4) the resulting Hellenistic Age of Greek kingdoms in Egypt, Syria and Macedonia; and (5) Rome's absorption of both Macedonia and mainland Greece. The course will devote roughly equal time to covering major events and personalities, exploring key social and cultural developments, and examining the various types of evidence available for the era.  There are two lectures and one discussion section per week.Textbooks:Walbank, The Hellenistic World, revised edition (Harvard 1992).Austin, The Hellenistic World: Sources in Translation, 2nd ed. (Cambridge 2006).Romm, The Landmark Arrian: the Campaigns of Alexander (Anchor 2010).This course carries a Global Cultures flag; it may also be counted as an elective.

C C 319D • Ancient Mediterranean World

33170-33185 • Spring 2013
Meets MW 1200pm-100pm WAG 201
(also listed as AHC 319, HIS 319D )
show description

"Ancient Mediterranean World" surveys the major civilizations of Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece and Italy from the dawn of the city around 3000 BC through the collapse of the Western Roman Empire in the fifth century AD. Beyond providing a basic historical framework, the course explores the surprising ways in which the various peoples of the area influenced one another culturally--including Egyptians, Babylonians, Hittites, Hebrews, Persians, Greeks and Romans. Students will also learn about the different types of evidence, both literary and archaeological, on which knowledge of the ancient world is based. There are two lectures and one discussion section per week.Textbooks:Mathisen, Ancient Mediterranean Civilizations (Oxford, 2012).Nagle & Burstein, The Ancient World: Readings, 4th ed. (Prentice Hall 2010).

C C 354D • History Of Greece To 146 Bc

33260-33270 • Spring 2013
Meets MW 1000am-1100am WAG 101
(also listed as AHC 325, EUS 346, HIS 354D )
show description

This course covers Greek history from the fall of Athens in 404 BC through Greece's loss of independence to Rome some 250 years later--an era defined by the figure of Alexander the Great. Classes will focus on five successive periods: (1) the decline of Greece's independent city-states; (2) their subordination to a Greek-speaking Macedonia under Philip II and his son, Alexander the Great; (3) Alexander's conquest of the Persian Empire; (4) the resulting Hellenistic Age of Greek kingdoms in Egypt, Syria and Macedonia; and (5) Rome's absorption of both Macedonia and mainland Greece. The course will devote roughly equal time to covering major events and personalities, exploring key social and cultural developments, and examining the various types of evidence available for the era.  There are two lectures and one discussion section per week.Textbooks:Walbank, The Hellenistic World, revised edition (Harvard 1992).Austin, The Hellenistic World: Sources in Translation, 2nd ed. (Cambridge 2006).Romm, The Landmark Arrian: the Campaigns of Alexander (Anchor 2010).This course carries a Global Cultures flag; it may also be counted as an elective.

AHC 325 • Hist Greece To End Pelopon War

32915-32930 • Fall 2012
Meets MW 100pm-200pm WAG 101
(also listed as C C 354C, CTI 375, HIS 354C )
show description

This course covers essential developments in Greek history during the Archaic and Early Classical Periods (ca. 800-400 B.C.). Emphasis will be divided between political/military history and ancient Greek society and culture (e.g. gender and class, religion, economy, performance). The course will consist of two hours of lecture per week plus a required one-hour discussion section. Particular attention will be paid to the interpretation of ancient sources, both written works and the archaeological remains. 

This course carries a Global Cultures flag; it may also be counted as an elective.

Grades will be based on:25% final exam20% midterm exam20% paper (5-7 pages)15% class presentation10% geography quiz10% participation There are no prerequisites.Required texts:1. S. Pomeroy et al., eds. Ancient Greece. 3rd ed. Oxford.2. M. Crawford and D. Whitehead, eds. Archaic and Classical Greece. Cambridge.

C C 354C • Hist Greece To End Pelopon War

33095-33110 • Fall 2012
Meets MW 100pm-200pm WAG 101
(also listed as AHC 325, CTI 375, HIS 354C )
show description

This course covers essential developments in Greek history during the Archaic and Early Classical Periods (ca. 800-400 B.C.). Emphasis will be divided between political/military history and ancient Greek society and culture (e.g. gender and class, religion, economy, performance). The course will consist of two hours of lecture per week plus a required one-hour discussion section. Particular attention will be paid to the interpretation of ancient sources, both written works and the archaeological remains. 

This course carries a Global Cultures flag; it may also be counted as an elective.

Grades will be based on:25% final exam20% midterm exam20% paper (5-7 pages)15% class presentation10% geography quiz10% participation There are no prerequisites.Required texts:1. S. Pomeroy et al., eds. Ancient Greece. 3rd ed. Oxford.2. M. Crawford and D. Whitehead, eds. Archaic and Classical Greece. Cambridge.

GK 311 • Intermediate Greek I

33230 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am WAG 112
show description

This semester we will read and analyze selections from the speeches of

Lysias.  Lysias, an Attic writer of the late 5th and early 4th century,

provides a fascinating window on to contemporary Athenian life in the

speeches he wrote for others to deliver in Athenian law courts. The

course has two main aims: to solidify and improve your grasp of Greek

grammar, vocabulary, and syntax (via reading Lysias as well as

systematic grammar review); and to analyze Lysias' style to understand

the importance not simply of what is said but how it is said. There will

be discussion of cultural and historical issues as well as continuous

review of grammar and stylistics.z

Regular attendance is required and daily preparation is essential.

Evaluation will be based on class participation, regular quizzes,

written work, two midterms, and a final.

Students earning a C or better will be ready to advance to GK 312

Intermediate Greek II.

This course can be counted as partial fulfillment of the foreign

language requirement, or to fulfill the General Culture requirement, or

as an elective.

 

Prerequisite:  Greek 507 or equivalent (i.e. first-year beginning Greek).

AHC 325 • History Of Greece To 146 Bc

32925-32940 • Spring 2012
Meets MW 1000am-1100am WAG 101
(also listed as C C 354D, EUS 346, HIS 354D )
show description

This course covers Greek history from the fall of Athens in 404 BC through Greece?s loss of independence to Rome some 250 years later?an era defined by the figure of Alexander the Great.

 Classes will focus on five successive periods: (1) the decline of Greece?s independent city-states; (2) their subordination to a Greek-speaking Macedonia under Philip II and his son, Alexander the Great; (3) Alexander?s conquest of the Persian Empire; (4) the resulting Hellenistic Age of Greek kingdoms in Egypt, Syria and Macedonia; and (5) Rome?s absorption of both Macedonia and mainland Greece.

 The course will devote roughly equal time to covering major events and personalities, exploring key developments in culture and society, and examining the various types of evidence available for the era.  There will be two hours of lecture and one hour of discussion each week.

 This course carries a Global Cultures flag; it may also be counted as an elective.

The final grade will be based on:

35% final exam

25% midterm exam

20% quizzes, short essays and participation in discussion section

20% 5-7 page paper

There are no prerequisites.

Texts:

Austin, M. The Hellenistic World (2nd ed.). Cambridge. 2006.

Green, P. The Hellenistic Age. Modern Library. 2007.

Romm, J., ed. The Landmark Arrian: The Campaigns of Alexander. Pantheon. 2010.

Strassler, R., ed. The Landmark Xenophon?s Hellenika. Pantheon. 2009.

C C 354D • History Of Greece To 146 Bc

33130-33145 • Spring 2012
Meets MW 1000am-1100am WAG 101
(also listed as AHC 325, EUS 346, HIS 354D )
show description

This course covers Greek history from the fall of Athens in 404 BC through Greece?s loss of independence to Rome some 250 years later?an era defined by the figure of Alexander the Great.

 Classes will focus on five successive periods: (1) the decline of Greece?s independent city-states; (2) their subordination to a Greek-speaking Macedonia under Philip II and his son, Alexander the Great; (3) Alexander?s conquest of the Persian Empire; (4) the resulting Hellenistic Age of Greek kingdoms in Egypt, Syria and Macedonia; and (5) Rome?s absorption of both Macedonia and mainland Greece.

 The course will devote roughly equal time to covering major events and personalities, exploring key developments in culture and society, and examining the various types of evidence available for the era.  There will be two hours of lecture and one hour of discussion each week.

 This course carries a Global Cultures flag; it may also be counted as an elective.

The final grade will be based on:

35% final exam

25% midterm exam

20% quizzes, short essays and participation in discussion section

20% 5-7 page paper

There are no prerequisites.

Texts:

Austin, M. The Hellenistic World (2nd ed.). Cambridge. 2006.

Green, P. The Hellenistic Age. Modern Library. 2007.

Romm, J., ed. The Landmark Arrian: The Campaigns of Alexander. Pantheon. 2010.

Strassler, R., ed. The Landmark Xenophon?s Hellenika. Pantheon. 2009.

GK 365 • Classical Historiography

33252 • Spring 2012
Meets MW 300pm-430pm WAG 10
(also listed as GK 385 )
show description

This course will provide an introduction to the development of the genre of history in the Classical Period with a focus on Herodotus, Thucydides, and Xenophon. 

 

GK 365 and GK 385 will meet together. Assignments will include passages in Greek and modern scholarship. 

 

Grades in GK 365 will depend on:

30% two midterms

20% short translation and commentary

10% critique of short translation and commentary

10% in-class translation and informed participation in class discussion 

30% a term paper (9-12 pages)

 

Grades in GK 385 will depend on:

20% two midterms

10% short translation and commentary

10% critique of short translation and commentary

40% a term paper (9-12 pages)

20% a final examination on three passages, one each from Herodotus Bk. 1, Thucydides Bk 1, and Xenophon (text(s) to be determined), intended as preparation for “the gobbets” of the Greek Literature exam.

 

Each student will make an oral presentation on the topic of his/her term paper. The length of the oral presentation will depend on the number of students in the class. A first draft of the term paper will be due on April 9, and the revised final version on May 5 (last day of class). 

 

Required texts:

OCT Herodotus I & II

OCT Thucydides I & II

GK 385 • Classical Historiography

33277 • Spring 2012
Meets MW 300pm-430pm WAG 10
(also listed as GK 365 )
show description

This course will provide an introduction to the development of the genre of history in the Classical Period with a focus on Herodotus, Thucydides, and Xenophon. 

 

GK 365 and GK 385 will meet together. Assignments will include passages in Greek and modern scholarship. 

 

Grades in GK 365 will depend on:

30% two midterms

20% short translation and commentary

10% critique of short translation and commentary

10% in-class translation and informed participation in class discussion 

30% a term paper (9-12 pages)

 

Grades in GK 385 will depend on:

20% two midterms

10% short translation and commentary

10% critique of short translation and commentary

40% a term paper (9-12 pages)

20% a final examination on three passages, one each from Herodotus Bk. 1, Thucydides Bk 1, and Xenophon (text(s) to be determined), intended as preparation for “the gobbets” of the Greek Literature exam.

 

Each student will make an oral presentation on the topic of his/her term paper. The length of the oral presentation will depend on the number of students in the class. A first draft of the term paper will be due on April 9, and the revised final version on May 5 (last day of class). 

 

Required texts:

OCT Herodotus I & II

OCT Thucydides I & II

AHC 319 • Ancient Mediterranean World

32770-32785 • Fall 2011
Meets MW 1000am-1100am UTC 3.110
(also listed as C C 319D, EUS 306, HIS 319D )
show description

AHC/CC 319D is a survey of the history, culture, and society of the peoples of the ancient Mediterranean (Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece, and Italy) from ca. 3000 B.C. to A.D. 476 focusing on the active cultural exchange among the diverse civilizations of the broader region that shaped their history and cultural identity and the development of ideas and institutions in the Greek and Roman worlds. It is intended to provide participants with a historical framework, to serve as a gateway to more advanced study of the ancient Mediterranean world, and to introduce students to the sources and methods used in its study. The course consists of two lectures and one mandatory discussion section per week.

 

Requirements/Grading Basis:

mid-term (30%)

final exam (40%)

papers (20%)

discussion section participation (10%)

C C 319D • Ancient Mediterranean World

32935-32940 • Fall 2011
Meets MW 1000am-1100am UTC 3.110
(also listed as AHC 319, EUS 306, HIS 319D )
show description

AHC/CC 319D is a survey of the history, culture, and society of the peoples of the ancient Mediterranean (Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece, and Italy) from ca. 3000 B.C. to A.D. 476 focusing on the active cultural exchange among the diverse civilizations of the broader region that shaped their history and cultural identity and the development of ideas and institutions in the Greek and Roman worlds. It is intended to provide participants with a historical framework, to serve as a gateway to more advanced study of the ancient Mediterranean world, and to introduce students to the sources and methods used in its study. The course consists of two lectures and one mandatory discussion section per week.

 

Requirements/Grading Basis:

mid-term (30%)

final exam (40%)

papers (20%)

discussion section participation (10%)

LAT 312K • Intermediate Latin II

33335 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm WAG 308
show description

This course is a complement to Latin 311 and is the final course in the beginning-intermediate Latin sequence.  In Latin 312, students will read selections from Vergil’s Aeneid.   The aim of the class is to develop students’ Latin reading and comprehension skills through careful translation of assigned and unseen passages; to review the basic morphology and syntax learned in Latin 506 and Latin 507 while introducing students to new forms and syntax as they arise; to enhance command of Latin vocabulary, including poetic diction; to introduce students to the literary and historical context of Vergil’s Aeneid; and to teach students the basic features of Latin meter.

Class time will be devoted to the translation of assigned Latin passages, ranging from 8-10 lines early in the semester to about 30 lines by the end of the semester.  Students will be expected to identify and explain the morphology and syntax of the assigned Latin.  They will be expected to be able to scan a dactylic hexameter and will practice scansion in class throughout the semester.  There will also be regular class discussions of the historical context and literary features of Vergil’s poem.  Students should expect homework assignments for each class meeting as well as regular quizzes, both announced and unannounced.  Final grades will be determined by attendance and class participation; quizzes; midterm exams; and a comprehensive final exam.  

Latin 312 fulfills the foreign language requirement. A grade of C or higher is required to advance to Latin 322.

The completion of 311 with a grade of C or higher is a prerequisite for Latin 312

 

Textbooks

Pharr, Aeneid Books I-VI, 1st ed. (Bolchazy-Carducci 1998).  ISBN 978-0-86516-421-5

Bennett, New Latin Grammar, 1st ed.,  (Bolchazy-Carducci, 2000).  ISBN 978-0-86516-262-7

Publications

“Instructive Irony in Herodotus: the Socles Scene,” GRBS 52 (2012): 559-586.

“The Northern Syria 2007 Hoard of Athenian Owls: Behavioral Aspects,” AJN 21 (2009): 1-27.

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