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Lesley Dean-Jones, Chair 2210 Speedway, Mail Code C3400, Austin, TX 78712-1738 • 512-471-5742

Stephanie P Craven

Assistant Instructor , University of Texas at Austin

Contact

Biography

I grew up in Basking Ridge, NJ and started taking Latin in middle school.  In 2006, I graduated from the University of Pennsylvania with a major in Classical Languages and Literature, a minor in Italian, and membership in Theta Alpha Kappa, the Religious Studies Honors society.  After graduation, I went to Prague and got a TEFL certification, then worked at a summer camp in the Dolomites, and finally ended up in Rome where I worked as tour guide in the Roman Forum for about nine months.  I entered the University of Texas in 2007, and received my MA in 2009, studying Cretan legal treaties from the Hellenistic period. I was a Regular Member at the American School of Classical Studies in Athens 2011-2012. I am currently working on a dissertation on Hellenistic Crete.

Interests

Hellenistic History, Greek Epigraphy

LAT S312K • Intermediate Latin II

82565 • Summer 2014
Meets MTWTHF 1000am-1130am WAG 112
show description

This course is a complement to Latin 311 and is the final course in the beginning-intermediate Latin sequence.  In Latin 312, students will read selections from Vergil’s Aeneid.   The aim of the class is to develop students’ Latin reading and comprehension skills through careful translation of assigned and unseen passages; to review the basic morphology and syntax learned in Latin 506 and Latin 507 while introducing students to new forms and syntax as they arise; to enhance command of Latin vocabulary, including poetic diction; to introduce students to the literary and historical context of Vergil’s Aeneid; and to teach students the basic features of Latin meter.

Class time will be devoted to the translation of assigned Latin passages, ranging from 8-10 lines early in the semester to about 30 lines by the end of the semester.  Students will be expected to identify and explain the morphology and syntax of the assigned Latin.  They will be expected to be able to scan a dactylic hexameter and will practice scansion in class throughout the semester.  There will also be regular class discussions of the historical context and literary features of Vergil’s poem.  Students should expect homework assignments for each class meeting as well as regular quizzes, both announced and unannounced.  Final grades will be determined by attendance and class participation; quizzes; midterm exams; and a comprehensive final exam.  

Latin 312 fulfills the foreign language requirement. A grade of C or higher is required to advance to Latin 322.

The completion of 311 with a grade of C or higher is a prerequisite for Latin 312.

LAT 312K • Intermediate Latin II

34035 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm GAR 2.128
show description

This course is a complement to Latin 311 and is the final course in the beginning-intermediate Latin sequence.  In Latin 312, students will read selections from Vergil’s Aeneid.   The aim of the class is to develop students’ Latin reading and comprehension skills through careful translation of assigned and unseen passages; to review the basic morphology and syntax learned in Latin 506 and Latin 507 while introducing students to new forms and syntax as they arise; to enhance command of Latin vocabulary, including poetic diction; to introduce students to the literary and historical context of Vergil’s Aeneid; and to teach students the basic features of Latin meter.

Class time will be devoted to the translation of assigned Latin passages, ranging from 8-10 lines early in the semester to about 30 lines by the end of the semester.  Students will be expected to identify and explain the morphology and syntax of the assigned Latin.  They will be expected to be able to scan a dactylic hexameter and will practice scansion in class throughout the semester.  There will also be regular class discussions of the historical context and literary features of Vergil’s poem.  Students should expect homework assignments for each class meeting as well as regular quizzes, both announced and unannounced.  Final grades will be determined by attendance and class participation; quizzes; midterm exams; and a comprehensive final exam.  

Latin 312 fulfills the foreign language requirement. A grade of C or higher is required to advance to Latin 322.

The completion of 311 with a grade of C or higher is a prerequisite for Latin 312

 

Textbooks

Pharr, Aeneid Books I-VI, 1st ed. (Bolchazy-Carducci 1998).  ISBN 978-0-86516-421-5

Bennett, New Latin Grammar, 1st ed.,  (Bolchazy-Carducci, 2000).  ISBN 978-0-86516-262-7

LAT 507 • First-Year Latin II

33680 • Fall 2013
Meets MTWTHF 1200pm-100pm WAG 10
show description

This course is the second half of a two-semester introduction to the basic forms, syntax, and vocabulary of Latin.  Translating passages from ancient writers also introduces students to fundamental features of Roman culture. Students who successfully complete this course will be able to reproduce paradigms of all Latin noun, adjective, adverb, and verb forms; to parse and explain the function of Latin words in context; to demonstrate fluency in basic Latin syntax and a growing vocabulary; to master standard pronunciation of Latin; and to translate accurately from Latin into English. In the latter part of the semester, students read selections from the writings of Julius Caesar in the original Latin.

Class time will be devoted to the introduction of new material, reviewing assigned homework, and practice exercises.  Students should expect daily homework assignments and regular quizzes, both announced and unannounced.  Final grades will be determined by attendance and class participation; quizzes; three midterm exams; and a comprehensive final exam. 

Latin 507 partially fulfills the foreign language requirement. A grade of C or higher is required to advance to Latin 311. 

The completion of Latin 506 with a grade of C or higher is a prerequisite for Latin 507. Students who have recently had more than two years of high school Latin, or more than two semesters of college Latin should normally take Latin 311.

Textbooks

Wheelock, Wheelock’s Latin, 7th ed. (Harper Collins, 2011).  ISBN 978-0-06-199722-8

English and Irby, A Little Latin Reader, 1st ed. (Oxford: OUP, 2012).  ISBN 978-0-19-984622-1

Groton, Thirty-Eight Latin Stories, 5th ed. (Bolchazy-Carducci 1995).  ISBN 978-0-86516-289-1

Comeau and LaFleur, Workbook for Wheelock’s Latin, 3rd ed. Rev. (Harper Collins, 2005).  ISBN

0-006-095642-9

Tatum, A Caesar Reader, 1st ed. (Bolchazy-Carducci 2012).  ISBN 978-0-86516-696-7

C C F302 • Introduction To Ancient Rome

82545 • Summer 2013
Meets MTWTHF 1000am-1130am GSB 2.122
(also listed as CTI F310 )
show description

This course provides an introductory-level survey of the history of Rome from its origins in the Iron Age (c. 800 BC) to its sack by the Gothic general Alaric in August 410 AD.

This course carries a Global Cultures flag.

C C S306M • Intro To Medcl & Scientif Term

82805 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTHF 830am-1000am MEZ B0.306
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This course provides a systematic introduction to medical and scientific terminology. Taking it will enable you to acquire a working knowledge of the Greek and Latin roots, prefixes and suffixes which provide the key to understanding “medspeak” – the highly specialized language of healthcare. You will learn principles of word analysis, synthesis, and pronunciation; and to help you master this material and understand its origins, we will look at relevant aspects of ancient Greek and Roman medico-scientific culture.

There are no prerequisites. Although we will be working with Latin and Greek terms, no background knowledge of either language is required or assumed.

Grades: 5 tests, lowest score will be dropped.

LAT 507 • First-Year Latin II

33665 • Spring 2011
Meets MTWTHF 1000am-1100am WAG 10
show description

This course is a continuation of Latin 506.  It has two main aims:  to increase the student's fluency in Latin through reading and close examination of grammar and syntax, and to introduce students to Roman life and culture.

There will be daily assignments from Wheelock’s Latin, including review of Chapters 1-27 and a careful study of Chapters 27-40.  This will be supplemented by further connected readings from Caesar’s Gallic Wars.

Prerequisites:  Completion of Latin 506 or the equivalent with a grade of C or higher.

Latin 507 may be counted as partially fulfilling the foreign language requirement, or the General Culture requirement, or as an elective.

Requirements: Class participation, quizzes, midterm tests, and a final exam.

 

Texts:

Wheelock, Wheelock's Latin  6th edition (Harper Collins)
Groton & May, 38 Latin Stories  (Bolchazy)
Caesar's Invasion of Britain (Bolchazy)
Goldman & Szymanski, English Grammar for Students of Latin (Olivia & Hill) (optional)

Students earning a C or better may advance to Intermediate Latin (Latin 311 and 312), where they will read selections from Vergil, Cicero, and other authors

LAT 507 • First-Year Latin II

32570 • Fall 2010
Meets MTWTHF 1000am-1100am WAG 10
show description

LAT 507 FIRST-YEAR LATIN II

32570

MTWTHF

1000 to  1100a

WAG  10

 

 


32575

MTWTHF

1200 to   100p

WAG  10

 

This course is a continuation of Latin 506.  It has two main aims:  to increase the student's fluency in Latin through reading and close examination of grammar and syntax, and to introduce students to Roman life and culture.

There will be daily assignments from Wheelock’s Latin, including review of Chapters 1-27 and a careful study of Chapters 27-40.  This will be supplemented by further connected readings from Caesar’s Gallic Wars.

Prerequisites:  Completion of Latin 506 or the equivalent with a grade of C or higher.

Latin 507 may be counted as partially fulfilling the foreign language requirement, or the General Culture requirement, or as an elective.

Requirements: Class participation, quizzes, midterm tests, and a final exam.

Texts:
Wheelock, Wheelock's Latin  6th edition (Harper Collins)
Groton & May, 38 Latin Stories  (Bolchazy)
Caesar's Invasion of Britain (Bolchazy)
Goldman & Szymanski, English Grammar for Students of Latin (Olivia & Hill) (optional)

Students earning a C or better may advance to Intermediate Latin (Latin 311 and 312), where they will read selections from Vergil, Cicero, and other authors

LAT 506 • First-Year Latin I

32870 • Spring 2010
Meets MTWTHF 1200-100pm CBA 4.344
show description

Latin 506 (32870)
M-F 12-1 CBA 4.344
Instructor: Stephanie Craven
Email: spcraven@gmail.com
Office: WAG 103
Office Hours: T/TH 1-2 or by appointment
Required Texts
Wheelock’s Latin, 6th Edition
38 Latin Stories, 5th Edition
Recommended: English Grammar for Students of Latin (ISBN 978-0-934034-34-0)
Course Description
The purpose of this course is to develop the basic Latin skills to prepare the student for
further study in the language in Latin 507. These skills will include acquiring an
understanding of Latin grammar, the intense memorization of word forms and paradigms,
and learning to recognize these forms “in the wild” in short readings. We will cover
chapters 1-25 in Wheelock’s Latin.
Grading Criteria
The grading for this class will come from weekly quizzes, 3 midterms, a final, and class
participation.
? Class Participation (10%) will be based upon your active participation in the class, and
certainly helped by coming to class prepared.
? Quizzes (15%) will be administered regularly throughout the semester and
announced at least 3 days before. The lowest 2 grades will be dropped. There will
be no make-ups.
? Midterms (50%); your best score is worth 20%, while the other 2 are worth 15%
each. They will consist of morphology (35%), a seen passage with IDs (45%), and a
sight passage (25%). THERE WILL BE NO MAKE-UPS EXCEPT IN THE CASE OF
AN UNAVOIDABLE EMERGENCY. (See Make-Up Policies for specifics.)
o Fri., February 12, 2010 (Chapters 1-7)
o Thurs., March 11, 2010 (Chapters 8-15)
o Fri., April 16, 2010 (Chapters 16-23)
? Final Exam (25%): date TBA (Cumulative 1-25)
Grading Scale (rounded to the nearest whole number, e.g. >93.5?94, >89.5?90)
100-94: A
93-90: A-
89-87: B+
86-84: B
83-80: B-
79-77: C+
76-74: C
73-70: C-
69-67: D+
66-65: D
Below 65: F
You must earn a C (not a C-) got advance to Latin 507.
Pass/Fail: a PASS must be above a 75.
Credit/No Credit: CREDIT must be above a 70.
Attendance and Tardiness
In order to get the most out of this class, you need to be present and on time.
Attendance: I will allow 4 unexcused absences, after which each unexcused absence will be
worth 1% off your final grade. Absences will only be excused for religious holidays, medical
reasons (with a letter from Student Health Services or a private physician), or for family
emergencies (only when certified by your Dean of Students). If students wish to have an
absence excused, documentation must be provided to the instructor within a week of the
student’s return to class.
Tardiness: I appreciate that the size of UT’s campus may make it difficult to get to class on
time, but tardiness is disruptive to other students and cuts into your own class time. Thus,
for every five times you are 5 minutes late or more, I will count it as 1 unexcused absence;
for every two times you are 15 minutes late or more, I will count it as 1 unexcused absence.
Make-up Policies
Make-up exams will be given only in cases of documented athletic commitment; documented
illness, death of an immediate family member (documented by an obituary listing you as a
survivor), or other documented emergency. Documented emergencies do not include, for
example (all real examples!): the illness or death of your roommate's pet; being in jail for
under-age drinking; a late night at Hooters; missing your ride back to Austin after a
weekend away; missing the bus to campus; or sleeping through your alarm. You must also
notify me in person or by phone as soon as possible and at least 3 hours BEFORE the time
of the exam that you will miss the exam. If you fail to do so, you will receive a zero on the
exam, regardless of the reason. If you are an athlete, you must make me aware of
scheduling conflicts during the first two weeks of the semester. You should also expect
that the make-up exam will be of a different form and significantly more difficult. Make-up
exams will be permitted no more than one week from the time of the originally scheduled
exam. After that point, the instructor reserves the right to refuse a make-up exam. I
strongly encourage you to take all exams at the time that they are scheduled.
Academic Honesty
Academic dishonesty in any form will not be tolerated. Please familiarize yourself with the
University of Texas’s Honor Code:
“The core values of The University of Texas at Austin are learning, discovery,
freedom, leadership, individual opportunity, and responsibility. Each member of the
University is expected to uphold these values through integrity, honesty, trust,
fairness, and respect toward peers and community.”
Any student caught or facilitating cheating on any assignment will receive an F in the course
and immediately be referred to the Dean of Students. In cases where dishonesty is
strongly suspected, I reserve the right to re-examine the student(s). I will, however,
assume absolute integrity on your part until shown otherwise. If you are unsure what
constitutes academic dishonesty, see http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs/scholdis.php.
It is your responsibility to be familiar with the contents of this website and to avoid any
behavior that might be interpreted as academic dishonesty.
Add/Drop Policy
Please familiarize yourself with the University of Texas’s official add/drop policy. Any
requests to drop the course after the fourth week will be handled in accordance with these
rules. Be forewarned: while you may use a “one time exception” to late-drop the course, the
exception is to the deadline, not to the requirement that you must be earning at least a 70%
in order to receive a Q-drop.
Students with Disabilities
The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic adjustments
for qualified students with disabilities. For more information contact the Dean of Students
at (512) 471-6259 or see http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/ssd. In order to receive
accommodations, you must be registered with the Services for Students with Disabilities
(SSD). This office will document your disability, inform me of your situation, and instruct
me on the necessary accommodations. If you chose not to register with SSD, I cannot make
special accommodations for you.
Religious Holidays
According to Section 51.911 of the Texas Education Code, students shall be excused from
attending classes or other required activities, including examinations, for the observance of
a religious holy day, including travel for that purpose. If you will miss class (including
exams) to celebrate a religious holiday, you must notify me AT LEAST 14 days prior to the
holiday so that we can make arrangements for you to make up the assignment. All make-up
work must be completed no later than one week after the missed class.
Schedule (Chapters are tentative, midterms are set)
Week 1: Introduction, Chapters 1-2
Week 2: Chapters 3-4
Week 3: Chapters 5-6
Week 4: Chapter 7; Midterm
Week 5: Chapters 8-9
Week 6: Chapters 10-11
Week 7: Chapters 12-13
Week 8: Chapters 14-15; Midterm
SPRING BREAK
Week 9: Chapters 16-17
Week 10: Chapters 18-19
Week 11: Chapters 20-22
Week 12: Chapter 23; Midterm
Week 13: Chapter 24
Week 14: Chapter 25
Week 15: Review
FINAL

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