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Lesley Dean-Jones, Chair 2210 Speedway, Mail Code C3400, Austin, TX 78712-1738 • 512-471-5742

William R Nethercut

Professor Ph.D., Columbia University

William R Nethercut

Contact

Biography

FieldsGreek and Roman Literature, Egyptology

 

 

 


Interests

Greek and Roman Literature, Egyptology

C C 304C • Intro To Ancient Egypt

33225 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm JES A121A
show description

This course is for the beginner. There are no pre-requisites other than a fascination for what has always seemed mysterious and powerful. We shall explore the most important chapters of Egypt's story, beginning with what is known of the pre-historical period from 13,000 B.C. down to the Neolithic and Pre-Dynastic era, 6,000 to 4,000 B.C. We shall then study the Old Kingdom, its first dynasties, monuments, personalities, culture, development of the hieroglyphic system, earliest mythological traditions (3100 to 2125 B.C.). The same inclusive review of language, culture, and history will be presented for the Middle Kingdom (2125 to 1550 B.C.) and New Kingdom (1550 to 1069 B.C.) In every instance we shall compare the Egyptian way of thinking with the cultural styles of the major Near Eastern civilizations. It will be particularly instructive to discover the ways in which Egyptian traditions were altered as we move down through the centuries. A startling example is the transformation of Set from a captain of Ra in the Old Kingdom who drove off the underworld Serpent to a base deceiver in the New Kingdom, or of Osiris, a disturbingly powerful force among the Dead in the Old Kingdom, into a more welcoming "St. Peter" in King Tut's funeral chamber (New Kingdom).

This course carries a Global Cultures flag.

Grading:

Three Examinations, each counting 33 13% of total grade

Texts:

Manley, Penguin Historical Atlas of Ancient Egypt

Seventy Great Mysteries of Ancient Egypt by Bill Manley ISBN 0 -500 - 05123 - 2

C C 348 • Egypt Hieroglyphics Cul Ctx

33330 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm WAG 112
show description

This course is designed for those who wish to learn the vocabulary and grammar of ancient Egyptian as a guide to understanding artefacts and monuments from the different periods of Egyptian history, whether in museums, exhibitions, or on site overseas. We shall begin with the signs painted on pottery from the pre-dynastic period, proceed with formulas popular in the Old Kingdom, including the Pyramid Texts from the Fifth Dynasty, and continue with the examination of stelae and cartouches from the Middle and New Kingdoms. Wherever we can find hieroglyphics, as on the reverse side of scarabs in Hatshepsut's collection, or graffiti from the Workmen's Village in the Valley of the Kings or on the obelisks of Karnak, Rome and New York City, we shall practice reading them.  With this background, we will engage texts from the Ptolemaic period and, notably, the Rosetta Stone. Formal communication  during the Roman rule in Egypt will offer a different opportunity to appreciate. In each case,  diverse artefacts and texts will allow us to extend our understanding of Egyptian history.

LAT 322 • Advanced Latin I

33690 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm WAG 112
show description

Latin 322 is the gateway course through which students who show a greater mastery of the skills of translation (Latin vocabulary and matching English vocabulary, idioms, Latin word arrangement, grammar) will pass ahead to more demanding courses like Latin 323, 324, and 365.

C C F348 • Ancient Egypt

82250 • Summer 2014
Meets MTWTHF 1130am-100pm WAG 112
show description

This course is for the beginner.  There are no pre-requisites other than a fascination for what has always seemed mysterious and powerful.  We shall explore the most important chapters of Egypt's story, beginning with what is known of the pre-historical period from 13,000 B.C. down to the Neolithic  and Pre-Dynastic era, 6,000 to 4,000 B.C.  We shall then study the Old Kingdom, its first dynasties, monuments, personalities, culture, development of the hieroglyphic system, earliest mythological traditions  (3100 to 2125 B.C.). The same inclusive review of language, culture, and history will be presented for the Middle Kingdom (2125 to 1550 B.C.) and New Kingdom  (1550 to 1069 B.C.)  In every instance we shall compare the Egyptian way of thinking with the cultural styles of the major Near Eastern civilizations.  It will be particularly instructive to discover the ways in which Egyptian traditions were altered as we move down through the centuries.  A startling example is the transformation of Set from a captain of Ra in the Old Kingdom who drove off the underworld Serpent to a base deceiver in the New Kingdom, or of Osiris, a  disturbingly powerful force among  the Dead in the Old Kingdom, into a more welcoming "St. Peter" in King Tut's funeral chamber (New Kingdom).

The difference between CC 304 c and the upper-level registration, CC 348, will be the requirement of a term paper, 8-10 pp. long, on any aspect of the course about which students wish to learn more and to follow up their own research.  Topics will range from the mythological connection with Atlantis and the pre-Columbian pyramids, "Pyramidology" and the complex systems by which the learned and mystically-oriented have sought to learn the occult message of the Great Pyramid, to what is scientific and recent, like the x-raying of mummies within their wrappings to learn of bone deficiencies or bad dentistry, or the field of Archaeoastronomy which is presently investigating earlier stone circles which were used for astronomical verification  prior to 6,000 B.C.  There is no reason why a Freshman who wants to study some spcial topic like the Book of the Dead or to take very preliminary steps toward the translation of Hieroglyphics can not begin to see what such subjects hold.

This course carries a Global Cultures flag.

C C 322 • Ancient Epic

33650 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm PAR 303
(also listed as CTI 345 )
show description

This course will cover the most important epic poems of Greece and Rome.  Texts will include Hesiod Theogony, Homer Iliad and Odyssey, Apollonius Jason and the Golden Fleece, Vergil Aeneid and Ovid Metamorphoses. Students will become familiar with the major characters, story lines, and genre conventions of ancient epic. We will consistently focus on the influence these poems had on each other, including some post-classical readings. Major course goals include:  acquiring knowledge of major authors, characters, story lines, and genre conventions of ancient epic; improving close reading, analytical, and communication skills.  Course requirements include: class attendance and participation, regular discussion board posts, two midterm exams, a final paper, and a final exam.

C C 348 • Daily Life In Ancient Egypt

33665 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 900am-1000am WAG 101
(also listed as MEL 321, MES 342 )
show description

This new course on Ancient Egypt will study the lives and experiences of specializing professionals  (Scribes, Soldiers, Priests, Craftsmen, Bureaucrats, Judges, Artists and Musicians, Doctors, Fan Bearers for the King ) and of the population at large (Slaves, Farm workers, Newcomers and Foreigners), at home as family, in the country, as travelers on the road. What was it like to be an Egyptian woman? We have the letters of young lovers, the magical spells used to control straying passion or to punish an enemy, the charms and amulets which protected a young mother during pregnancy and childbirth. Women wrote wills, appeared in court, and could initiate divorce.  Lineage passed along the maternal side of the family. What would it have been like to be Pharaoh for a day? Personal religion, Public Festivals, Hygiene and refuse control, Pets, Mummification and the provision of food, clothing, furniture and personal articles (like razors, mirrors or sewing needles) for the dead, even pornography and rituals to renew potency- all of these topics and many more find their place within our study.

Texts

Donald Ryan,  Ancient Egypt on 5 Deben a Day  (Thames & Hudson, London, 2010)

Pierre Montet,  Everyday Life in Egypt in the Days of Ramesses the Great (Pennsylvania Edition, 1981)

Sergio Donadoni,  The Egyptians  (University of Chicago Press, 1997)

Grading

Two Hour Exams (35 % each) and a Research Paper (30%)

 

 

C C 304C • Intro To Ancient Egypt

33270 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm JES A121A
show description

This course is for the beginner. There are no pre-requisites other than a fascination for what has always seemed mysterious and powerful. We shall explore the most important chapters of Egypt's story, beginning with what is known of the pre-historical period from 13,000 B.C. down to the Neolithic and Pre-Dynastic era, 6,000 to 4,000 B.C. We shall then study the Old Kingdom, its first dynasties, monuments, personalities, culture, development of the hieroglyphic system, earliest mythological traditions (3100 to 2125 B.C.). The same inclusive review of language, culture, and history will be presented for the Middle Kingdom (2125 to 1550 B.C.) and New Kingdom (1550 to 1069 B.C.) In every instance we shall compare the Egyptian way of thinking with the cultural styles of the major Near Eastern civilizations. It will be particularly instructive to discover the ways in which Egyptian traditions were altered as we move down through the centuries. A startling example is the transformation of Set from a captain of Ra in the Old Kingdom who drove off the underworld Serpent to a base deceiver in the New Kingdom, or of Osiris, a disturbingly powerful force among the Dead in the Old Kingdom, into a more welcoming "St. Peter" in King Tut's funeral chamber (New Kingdom).

This course carries a Global Cultures flag.

Grading:

Three Examinations, each counting 33 13% of total grade

Texts:

Manley, Penguin Historical Atlas of Ancient Egypt

Seventy Great Mysteries of Ancient Egypt by Bill Manley ISBN 0 -500 - 05123 - 2

C C 348 • Egyptian Hieroglyphics Cul Ctx

33325 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm WAG 208
show description

This course is designed for those who wish to learn the vocabulary and grammar of ancient Egyptian as a guide to understanding artefacts and monuments from the different periods of Egyptian history, whether in museums, exhibitions, or on site overseas. We shall begin with the signs painted on pottery from the predynastic period, proceed with formulas popular in the Old Kingdom, including the Pyramid Texts from the Fifth Dynasty, and continue with the examination of stelae and cartouches from the Middle and New Kingdoms. Wherever we can find hieroglyphics, as on the reverse side of scarabs in Hatshepsut's collection, or graffiti from the Workmen's Village in the Valley of the Kings or on the obelisks of Karnak, Rome and New York City, we shall practice reading them. With this background, we will engage texts from the Ptolemaic period and, notably, the Rosetta Stone. Formal communication during the Roman rule in Egypt will offer a different opportunity to appreciate. In each case, diverse artefacts and texts will allow us to extend our understanding of Egyptian history.

LAT 323 • Cicero And Catullus

33720 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 900am-1000am WAG 308
show description

Cicero was the greatest lawyer of the Roman Republic. He aimed to be the embodiment of the social and political establishment. Catullus, his younger contemporary, preferred to play the artistic rebel. He was the first great Roman writer of lyric poetry and epigram. Nearly the only thing they shared was a deeply snarky sense of humor. We will read both to get their different perspectives on Rome's empire. What was it good for? What did it cost? What effect did it have on the subjects? Did their opinions count?The first object of the course will be to improve reading ability, but we will also devote considerable attention to the kinds of questions just raised and the rhetorical and poetic tactics they bring into play.

Grading:

Class participation 20%   article summary 05%2 tests (each) 15%          final exam 30%short paper 15%

Texts:

Cicero, Pro M. Caelio Oratio (R.G. Austin, Clarendon Paperbacks, 1991 3rd edition)The Students' Catullus (Daniel H. Garrison, University of Oklahoma Press, 1995 2nd edition, paperback)

C C F348 • Ancient Egypt

82555 • Summer 2013
Meets MTWTHF 1130am-100pm CBA 4.338
show description

The development and progress of ancient civilization, including history, philosophy, literature, and culture. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required.

C C 322 • Ancient Epic

33190 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm PAR 303
(also listed as CTI 345 )
show description

This course focuses on the major epic poetry of Greece and Rome, primarily Homer, Apollonius, Vergil, and Ovid, although we will also look at relevant Near Eastern works such as the Epic of Gilgamesh and occasional modern writings. Topics will include the epic genre; conventions of classical epic poetry; similarities and differences between individual poems covered (how different poets use the same genre; how different poets tell a given mythological story); historical and cultural contexts for each text. Requirements: class attendance and participation; regular posts to class discussion boards; occasional quizzes; two midterm  exams and a final exam; one short paper.  Texts: TBA

C C 348 • Ancient Egypt

33250 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 900am-1000am WAG 101
show description

The development and progress of ancient civilization, including history, philosophy, literature, and culture. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required.

 

LAT 324 • Adv Latin Grammar & Compositn

33600 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm WAG 112
show description

This course will provide an intensive review of Latin grammar, morphology and syntax as well as an introduction to the fundamental elements of Latin prose style across a range of genres and periods.  It will be assumed that the student has a good, general grasp of Latin syntax and morphology.  Students registered for Latin 324 must have taken AT LEAST 4 semesters of Latin and, preferably, also at least one upper division Latin prose course at the University of Texas.  Please note that this course will be extremely challenging if you have no experience in reading extended passages of Latin prose.  No previous experience in prose composition is necessary for success in this course; you must, however, be willing to attend class regularly, participate, and prepare the assigned compositions and readings if you expect to do well.   Class meetings will be devoted to discussions of Latin grammar, syntax, and style; review of weekly assignments; and the close reading of extended prose passages. Your final grade will be determined by your performance on the following exercises:3 midterms (60%)weekly assignments and participation (25%)original prose composition and peer evaluation (15%)

 

Texts:

North and Hillard, Latin Prose CompositionCharles Bennet, A Latin GrammarAdditional readings available as pdf files

C C 304C • Introduction To Ancient Egypt

33040 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm JES A121A
(also listed as MES 310 )
show description

This course is for the beginner. There are no pre-requisites other than a fascination for what has always seemed mysterious and powerful. We shall explore the most important chapters of Egypt's story, beginning with what is known of the pre-historical period from 13,000 B.C. down to the Neolithic and Pre-Dynastic era, 6,000 to 4,000 B.C. We shall then study the Old Kingdom, its first dynasties, monuments, personalities, culture, development of the hieroglyphic system, earliest mythological traditions (3100 to 2125 B.C.). The same inclusive review of language, culture, and history will be presented for the Middle Kingdom (2125 to 1550 B.C.) and New Kingdom (1550 to 1069 B.C.) In every instance we shall compare the Egyptian way of thinking with the cultural styles of the major Near Eastern civilizations. It will be particularly instructive to discover the ways in which Egyptian traditions were altered as we move down through the centuries. A startling example is the transformation of Set from a captain of Ra in the Old Kingdom who drove off the underworld Serpent to a base deceiver in the New Kingdom, or of Osiris, a disturbingly powerful force among the Dead in the Old Kingdom, into a more welcoming "St. Peter" in King Tut's funeral chamber (New Kingdom). Nubia (Sudan) and the influence of Nubia and Egypt in the early centuries CE is also covered, taking in the Coptic culture as a blend of Greek and Egyptian.

Texts: Manley, Penguin Historical Atlas of Ancient Egypt

Seventy Great Mysteries of Ancient Egypt by Bill Manley ISBN 0 -500 - 05123 - 2

C C 348 • Egyptian Hieroglyphics Cul Ctx

33085 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm GAR 0.128
show description

This course is designed for those who wish to learn the vocabulary and grammar of ancient Egyptian as a guide to understanding artefacts and monuments from the different periods of Egyptian history, whether in museums, exhibitions, or on site overseas. We shall begin with the signs painted on pottery from the pre-dynastic period, proceed with formulas popular in the Old Kingdom, including the Pyramid Texts from the Fifth Dynasty, and continue with the examination of stelae and cartouches from the Middle and New Kingdoms. Wherever we can find hieroglyphics, as on the reverse side of scarabs in Hatshepsut's collection, or graffiti from the Workmen's Village in the Valley of the Kings or on the obelisks of Karnak, Rome and New York City, we shall practice reading them.  With this background, we will engage texts from the Ptolemaic period and, notably, the Rosetta Stone. Formal communication  during the Roman rule in Egypt will offer a different opportunity to appreciate. In each case,  diverse artefacts and texts will allow us to extend our understanding of Egyptian history.

LAT 365 • Epyllion And Epos

33463 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm WAG 208
(also listed as LAT 385 )
show description

EPYLLION  UND  EPOS

 

We shall study the development of Latin epic, beginning with Catullus poem 64,  the greatest of the  "little epics" (epyllia) which  we have from the last century of the Roman Republic and an important model for Vergil in Aeneid 4.  Our second poet will be Vergil, in whose Georgics (especially the end of Georgics Book 4, an adaptation of the epyllion) we find a preliminary working out of issues which become iconic for the Aeneid.  We will turn then to Lucan and his remarkable transformation of Vergil's story of Rome.

 

TEXTS:  for Catullus:  Dan Garrison, The Student's Catullus (Oklahoma Press)

            for Lucan:  Susanna Braund,  A Lucan Reader (Bolchazy-Carducci)

            for Vergil:  Oxford Classical Text

 

LATIN 365

An important aim of this course is to engage students in reading some of the critical essays written on our topic and to develop their own research papers.  This course has a writing flag, signifying the care given to reviewing the different drafts of this paper through the semester and to preparing the final version.

 

LATIN 385

Graduate students will likewise prepare a term paper.  They will also be assigned  and tested upon additional readings in Latin relevant to the course, for example in the epyllia of the last century BCE,

and in Vergil and Lucan.

 

GRADING:  Three short translation tests  (30%),  a translation  Hour Examination (30%), Research Paper (40%)

LAT 385 • Epyllion And Epos

33493 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm WAG 208
(also listed as LAT 365 )
show description

EPYLLION  UND  EPOS

 

We shall study the development of Latin epic, beginning with Catullus poem 64,  the greatest of the  "little epics" (epyllia) which  we have from the last century of the Roman Republic and an important model for Vergil in Aeneid 4.  Our second poet will be Vergil, in whose Georgics (especially the end of Georgics Book 4, an adaptation of the epyllion) we find a preliminary working out of issues which become iconic for the Aeneid.  We will turn then to Lucan and his remarkable transformation of Vergil's story of Rome.

 

TEXTS:  for Catullus:  Dan Garrison, The Student's Catullus (Oklahoma Press)

            for Lucan:  Susanna Braund,  A Lucan Reader (Bolchazy-Carducci)

            for Vergil:  Oxford Classical Text

 

LATIN 365

An important aim of this course is to engage students in reading some of the critical essays written on our topic and to develop their own research papers.  This course has a writing flag, signifying the care given to reviewing the different drafts of this paper through the semester and to preparing the final version.

 

LATIN 385

Graduate students will likewise prepare a term paper.  They will also be assigned  and tested upon additional readings in Latin relevant to the course, for example in the epyllia of the last century BCE,

and in Vergil and Lucan.

 

GRADING:  Three short translation tests  (30%),  a translation  Hour Examination (30%), Research Paper (40%)

C C F348 • Ancient Egypt

82760 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTHF 1130am-100pm PAR 105
show description

Course Description:  This will be a comprehensive introduction to the story of ancient                                                                 Egypt, beginning with the earliest evidence at Nabta Playa,

                                   ca. 6000 BC, and continuing as far down as the Greco-Roman

                                   centuries (300 BC – AD 300).  In each era we shall emphasize the 

                                   culture distinctive of the time.  Our first text (MYSTERIES) will

                                   bring us up to date on the “hot” issues of historical and 

                                   archaeological research; the second text (ATLAS) provides

                                   informative historical analysis grounded in detailed maps.  These

                                   will enable you to become familiar with locations in Egypt, the

                                   Near East, and Africa, which are important for our study. I have 

                                   added a third text (HISTORY).  This book has just been published

                                   and surveys the material concisely and with great fairness. Added

                                   side discussions are valuable.  I shall also build in instruction in

                                   the reading of hieroglyphics, as our regular work may warrant.

 

                                   Important:  Students who have already taken CC 304 C

                                   are not allowed to count  CC 348 as a separate three hours

                                   toward an area credit.In such a case, CC 348 will be registered

                                   a redundant elective.

 

C C 348 • Ancient Egypt

33125 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am WAG 214
show description

This course is for the beginner.  There are no pre-requisites other than a fascination for what has always seemed mysterious and powerful.  We shall explore the most important chapters of Egypt's story, beginning with what is known of the pre-historical period from 13,000 B.C. down to the Neolithic  and Pre-Dynastic era, 6,000 to 4,000 B.C.  We shall then study the Old Kingdom, its first dynasties, monuments, personalities, culture, development of the hieroglyphic system, earliest mythological traditions  (3100 to 2125 B.C.). The same inclusive review of language, culture, and history will be presented for the Middle Kingdom (2125 to 1550 B.C.) and New Kingdom  (1550 to 1069 B.C.)  In every instance we shall compare the Egyptian way of thinking with the cultural styles of the major Near Eastern civilizations.  It will be particularly instructive to discover the ways in which Egyptian traditions were altered as we move down through the centuries.  A startling example is the transformation of Set from a captain of Ra in the Old Kingdom who drove off the underworld Serpent to a base deceiver in the New Kingdom, or of Osiris, a  disturbingly powerful force among  the Dead in the Old Kingdom, into a more welcoming "St. Peter" in King Tut's funeral chamber (New Kingdom).

     The difference between CC 304 c and the upper-level registration, CC 348, will be the requirement of a term paper, 8-10 pp. long, on any aspect of the course about which students wish to learn more and to follow up their own research.  Topics will range from the mythological connection with Atlantis and the pre-Columbian pyramids, "Pyramidology" and the complex systems by which the learned and mystically-oriented have sought to learn the occult message of the Great Pyramid, to what is scientific and recent, like the x-raying of mummies within their wrappings to learn of bone deficiencies or bad dentistry, or the field of Archaeoastronomy which is presently investigating earlier stone circles which were used for astronomical verification  prior to 6,000 B.C.  There is no reason why a Freshman who wants to study some spcial topic like the Book of the Dead or to take very preliminary steps toward the translation of Hieroglyphics can not begin to see what such subjects hold.

 

This course carries a Global Cultures flag; it may also be counted as an elective.

 

Grading: Four Quizzes (with the lowest Quiz dropped) 30%. One Quiz on Egyptian Hieroglyphics 10%, Term Paper 15%, Two Hour Examinations 55%.

LAT 506 • First-Year Latin I

33390 • Spring 2012
Meets MTWTHF 900am-1000am WAG 10
show description

This course is an introduction to Latin, the language of ancient Rome and famous writers like Caesar, Cicero, Vergil, and St. Augustine. Latin is also an excellent way to improve your command of other languages: Latin is the source of over 60% of English vocabulary, and also the ancestor of all the “Romance” languages of Europe, including French, Italian, Portuguese, and Spanish.

Latin 506 introduces basic grammar and vocabulary in an interesting and challenging format, through reading selections from a wide range of Roman authors and exploring aspects of Roman life and culture.  By the end of the semester, students are reading excerpts from famous works and ready to continue into Latin 507.

The course covers chapters 1-25 of Wheelock’s Latin and also selected readings from 38 Latin Stories. There will be daily assignments, regular quizzes, midterm tests, a group project and a final exam.

 Prerequisites: None. Note: This course may not be counted by students offering two or more admission units or any previous college credit in Latin.  

Latin 506 may be counted as partially fulfilling the foreign language requirement, or the General Culture requirement, or as an elective.

Requirements: Class participation, homework, quizzes, midterm tests, a group project and a final exam.

Students earning a C or better may advance to Latin 507: First-Year Latin II, where they will read selections from Caesar and other authors.

Texts:

Wheelock, Wheelock's Latin (Harper 6h edition)

Groton & May, 38 Latin Stories (Bolchazy)

 

Class Website: http://latin506.weebly.com/

LAT 324 • Adv Latin Grammar & Compositn

33460 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm WAG 112
show description

This course will provide an intensive review of Latin grammar, morphology and syntax as well as an introduction to the fundamental elements of Latin prose style across a range of genres and periods.  It will be assumed that the student has a good, general grasp of Latin syntax and morphology.  Students registered for Latin 324 must have taken AT LEAST 4 semesters of Latin and, preferably, also at least one upper division Latin prose course at the University of Texas.  Please note that this course will be extremely challenging if you have no experience in reading extended passages of Latin prose.  No previous experience in prose composition is necessary for success in this course; you must, however, be willing to attend class regularly, participate, and prepare the assigned compositions and readings if you expect to do well.   Class meetings will be devoted to discussions of Latin grammar, syntax, and style; review of weekly assignments; and the close reading of extended prose passages.

C C 304C • Introduction To Ancient Egypt

32905 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm JES A121A
(also listed as MES 310 )
show description

This course is for the beginner. There are no pre-requisites other than a fascination for what has always seemed mysterious and powerful. We shall explore the most important chapters of Egypt's story, beginning with what is known of the pre-historical period from 13,000 B.C. down to the Neolithic and Pre-Dynastic era, 6,000 to 4,000 B.C. We shall then study the Old Kingdom, its first dynasties, monuments, personalities, culture, development of the hieroglyphic system, earliest mythological traditions (3100 to 2125 B.C.). The same inclusive review of language, culture, and history will be presented for the Middle Kingdom (2125 to 1550 B.C.) and New Kingdom (1550 to 1069 B.C.) In every instance we shall compare the Egyptian way of thinking with the cultural styles of the major Near Eastern civilizations. It will be particularly instructive to discover the ways in which Egyptian traditions were altered as we move down through the centuries. A startling example is the transformation of Set from a captain of Ra in the Old Kingdom who drove off the underworld Serpent to a base deceiver in the New Kingdom, or of Osiris, a disturbingly powerful force among the Dead in the Old Kingdom, into a more welcoming "St. Peter" in King Tut's funeral chamber (New Kingdom). Grading: Three Examinations, each counting 33 13% of total grade   Texts: Manley, Penguin Historical Atlas of Ancient Egypt Seventy Great Mysteries of Ancient Egypt by Bill Manley ISBN 0 -500 - 05123 – 2

LAT 322 • Advanced Latin I

33340 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm WAG 208
show description

Latin 322 is the gateway course through which students who show a greater mastery of the skills of translation (Latin vocabulary and matching English vocabulary, idioms, Latin word arrangement, grammar) will pass ahead to more demanding courses like Latin 323, 324, and 365.

C C F348 • Ancient Egypt

82600 • Summer 2011
Meets MTWTHF 1130am-100pm WAG 101
show description

Course Description:  This will be a comprehensive introduction to the story of ancient                                                                 Egypt, beginning with the earliest evidence at Nabta Playa,

                                   ca. 6000 BC, and continuing as far down as the Greco-Roman

                                   centuries (300 BC – AD 300).  In each era we shall emphasize the 

                                   culture distinctive of the time.  Our first text (MYSTERIES) will

                                   bring us up to date on the “hot” issues of historical and 

                                   archaeological research; the second text (ATLAS) provides

                                   informative historical analysis grounded in detailed maps.  These

                                   will enable you to become familiar with locations in Egypt, the

                                   Near East, and Africa, which are important for our study. I have 

                                   added a third text (HISTORY).  This book has just been published

                                   and surveys the material concisely and with great fairness. Added

                                   side discussions are valuable.  I shall also build in instruction in

                                   the reading of hieroglyphics, as our regular work may warrant.

 

                                   Important:  Students who have already taken CC 304 C

                                   are not allowed to count  CC 348 as a separate three hours

                                   toward an area credit.In such a case, CC 348 will be registered

                                   a redundant elective.

 

C C 348 • Ancient Egypt

33385 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am WEL 2.304
show description

This course is for the beginner.  There are no pre-requisites other than a fascination for what has always seemed mysterious and powerful.  We shall explore the most important chapters of Egypt's story, beginning with what is known of the pre-historical period from 13,000 B.C. down to the Neolithic  and Pre-Dynastic era, 6,000 to 4,000 B.C.  We shall then study the Old Kingdom, its first dynasties, monuments, personalities, culture, development of the hieroglyphic system, earliest mythological traditions  (3100 to 2125 B.C.). The same inclusive review of language, culture, and history will be presented for the Middle Kingdom (2125 to 1550 B.C.) and New Kingdom  (1550 to 1069 B.C.)  In every instance we shall compare the Egyptian way of thinking with the cultural styles of the major Near Eastern civilizations.  It will be particularly instructive to discover the ways in which Egyptian traditions were altered as we move down through the centuries.  A startling example is the transformation of Set from a captain of Ra in the Old Kingdom who drove off the underworld Serpent to a base deceiver in the New Kingdom, or of Osiris, a  disturbingly powerful force among  the Dead in the Old Kingdom, into a more welcoming "St. Peter" in King Tut's funeral chamber (New Kingdom).
     The difference between CC 304 c and the upper-level registration, CC 348, will be the requirement of a term paper, 8-10 pp. long, on any aspect of the course about which students wish to learn more and to follow up their own research.  Topics will range from the mythological connection with Atlantis and the pre-Columbian pyramids, "Pyramidology" and the complex systems by which the learned and mystically-oriented have sought to learn the occult message of the Great Pyramid, to what is scientific and recent, like the x-raying of mummies within their wrappings to learn of bone deficiencies or bad dentistry, or the field of Archaeoastronomy which is presently investigating earlier stone circles which were used for astronomical verification  prior to 6,000 B.C.  There is no reason why a Freshman who wants to study some spcial topic like the Book of the Dead or to take very preliminary steps toward the translation of Hieroglyphics can not begin to see what such subjects hold.


This course carries a Global Cultures flag; it may also be counted as an elective

Grading: Four Quizzes (with the lowest Quiz dropped) 30%. One Quiz on Egyptian Hieroglyphics 10%, Term Paper 15%, Two Hour Examinations 55%.

LAT 323 • Horace's Odes

33725 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 930am-1100am WAG 112
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Why are we offering this course? Because Horace’s Odes are a poster child for reading such works in the original.  These poems are exquisitely crafted and a quietly scintillating, sophisticated scenario of how to put together words for maximum associative effect and of poetic structure and metrical variety.  Augustus called himself princeps in the Roman state; his good, but independent friend Horace confidently proclaimed himself as princeps in his poetic domain. Plus there is the great variety of topics: general reflections on life, love poems (well, he’s trying), drinking songs, political issues.  We’ll have plenty to keep us occupied, including the cultural context of the Augustan age.

Exams etc.: there’ll be some quizzes on vocab and meter, four one-hour tests, and short reports.  Mainly: this class will be far from outsized and a great opportunity for individual contributions.  Class participation, therefore, is a top priority.

Texts:

Daniel Garrison, Horace.  Odes and Epodes (1998).  Publisher: Oklahoma Series in Classical Culture – no, that’s not an oxymoron.

LAT 324 • Adv Latin Grammar & Compositn

33730 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm WAG 112
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This course will provide an intensive review of Latin grammar, morphology and syntax as well as an introduction to the fundamental elements of Latin prose style across a range of genres and periods.  It will be assumed that the student has a good, general grasp of Latin syntax and morphology.  Students registered for Latin 324 must have taken AT LEAST 4 semesters of Latin and, preferably, also at least one upper division Latin prose course at the University of Texas.  Please note that this course will be extremely challenging if you have no experience in reading extended passages of Latin prose.  No previous experience in prose composition is necessary for success in this course; you must, however, be willing to attend class regularly, participate, and prepare the assigned compositions and readings if you expect to do well.   Class meetings will be devoted to discussions of Latin grammar, syntax, and style; review of weekly assignments; and the close reading of extended prose passages. Your final grade will be determined by your performance on the following exercises:

3 midterms (60%)
weekly assignments and participation (25%)
original prose composition and peer evaluation (15%)

 

Texts:

North and Hillard, Latin Prose Composition
Charles Bennet, A Latin Grammar
Additional readings available as pdf files

LAT 398T • Supervised Teaching In Latin

33790 • Spring 2011
Meets WF 200pm-500pm WAG 210
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This course is designed to introduce graduate students to methods of teaching, especially introductory and intermediate Latin classes. Topics will include planning the course and devising the syllabus, presenting lessons, assigning and evaluating homework, making up and grading quizzes and exams, and other matters of importance.

Grading will be based on class participation and a number of projects.

C C 304C • Intro To Ancient Egypt

32195 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm JES A121A
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This course is for the beginner. There are no pre-requisites other than a fascination for what has always seemed mysterious and powerful. We shall explore the most important chapters of Egypt's story, beginning with what is known of the pre-historical period from 13,000 B.C. down to the Neolithic and Pre-Dynastic era, 6,000 to 4,000 B.C. We shall then study the Old Kingdom, its first dynasties, monuments, personalities, culture, development of the hieroglyphic system, earliest mythological traditions (3100 to 2125 B.C.). The same inclusive review of language, culture, and history will be presented for the Middle Kingdom (2125 to 1550 B.C.) and New Kingdom (1550 to 1069 B.C.) In every instance we shall compare the Egyptian way of thinking with the cultural styles of the major Near Eastern civilizations. It will be particularly instructive to discover the ways in which Egyptian traditions were altered as we move down through the centuries. A startling example is the transformation of Set from a captain of Ra in the Old Kingdom who drove off the underworld Serpent to a base deceiver in the New Kingdom, or of Osiris, a disturbingly powerful force among the Dead in the Old Kingdom, into a more welcoming "St. Peter" in King Tut's funeral chamber (New Kingdom). Grading: Three Examinations, each counting 33 13% of total grade

LAT 322 • Advanced Latin I

32608 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm WAG 420
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Did you know that ROME spelled backward is AMOR? Both words have significance
    for our course. Nothing lay closer to the Roman heart than the history of the city
    and the memory of her legendary leaders. To be a Roman meant to live a life guided by the
    imposing ideals and civic commitment which had shaped the nation's destiny.  Livy,
    perhaps Rome's greatest historian, will be our first text. We will cover many of the
    most famous stories, from the "wolf" which nursed Romulus and Remus, the UFO and strange
    symbols of Numa Pompilius, to "Lefty" Scxaevola's right hand, to Hannibal with his
    elephants crashing off the icy cliffs of the Alps and getting stuck in the mud of Lake
    Trasimennus. But Rome was not only history;  her greatest love poet, Ovid, will guide
    us into the exciting life of dudes and dudettes, of casual hook-ups, of secret love notes,
    of the perils of not getting your lady the right birthday gift, all the contemporary scenes
    of Augustan passion, colored unforgettably by mythological spice.  Cougars and boy-toys
    are here,and the steamy lady who, though proper, may remind us of Pasiphae who went crazy
    after a sexy bull!

    Latin 322 will be the gateway course through which students who show a greater
    mastery of the skills of translation ( Latin vocabulary and matching English vocabulary,
    idioms, Latin word arrangement , grammar) will pass ahead to more demanding courses
    like Latin 323, 324, and 365.

    Grading: Class Participation (10%),   Translation in class (20%),  Three Hour Exams
    (23 and 24%).

 

Texts:  Livy, History of Rome;  Ovid, Art of Love

C C 348 • Ancient Egypt

82138 • Summer 2010
Meets MTWTHF 1130am-100pm WAG 101
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Imagine an ancient land watched over by the inscrutable faces of alien gods,
    a language of such poetry that its first word forms pictured the stars shining on water,
    a place where the sun's light was so rapturous that it inspired people to sing.  In the
    sands of the desert here we find  a stone circle with sighting lines drawn before 6000 BC
    to mark the brightest stars of Orion and their distances, in light years, from earth. Canyons
    lost in the eastern desert show strange figures standing on boats with their arms raised to
    curve over their heads.  Were these priestesses? Priests of Heliopolis ("City of the Sun")
    and expert engineers combined their efforts to transform into stone the widening prism of
    a sun ray's pure light falling upon the ground. Who was it who oversaw the creation of the
    pyramids in a pattern which brought onto the earth the star outlines of Orion and Taurus?
    What does it mean that in Egyptian mathematics the hieroglyphic sign for "Beautiful,
    Perfect" has the value Zero?  How can the creator god Atum have a name that means
    "Everything" but also " Nothing"? Egyptian medicine lists many successes: cranial  surgery
     to relieve swelling of the brain, amputation techniques so that the remaining bone would
    continue to grow, knowing the brain is central to the nervous system, the circulatory system
    that sustains the body.  Strange inscriptions in the pyramids, the secret coding of the Book
    of the Dead, and pictures painted in tombs developed a powerful spiritual technology
    to help a dying person at the moment of his death maintain consciousness and control over
    his departure from the body.  Names challenge us to know more about their remarkable
    owners:  Akhenaton, Hatshepsut, Tut, Ramesses, Tutmosis, who saw a UFO and left a
    monument telling how it made all his enemies run off, Nefertiti and Nefertari, and Merit Aten
    who led her followers out of Egypt to Morocco (the Atlas mountains have a small town
    named "RA") and then to  a northern region named for the arrival of "a Woman from the Sea",
    "SCOTA'S LAND". These topics, and many more, line the pathway we shall follow this
    summer.

    Grading:  Three Quizzes (10% each), and two Hour Exams (35% each).  No paper.
                   No final examination.

C C 303 • Intro To Classical Mythology

32475 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm GEA 105
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Myths accompanied Greek and Roman culture as a constant from the pre-literate era before the Homeric epics through the hyper-literary myths of the Roman period. These myths helped the ancient Greeks and Romans to make sense of their world and to address issues with regard to religion, philosophy, and even early attempts at natural science. In different forms, myths still inform our understanding of the world, and Classical mythology in particular has continued to influence western art and literature up to the present day. This class begins with an examination of the Greek understanding of the creation of the world, the pantheon of gods, and the creation of humanity. Time will also be spent on the origins of Greek mythology, looking to the mythologies of Near Eastern cultures, which have influenced Greek thought. Throughout the course attention will be given to particular gods, goddesses, heroes and heroines and the myths which surround them in both the Greek and Roman traditions. Classical Civilization 303 and 352 may not both be counted.

This course carries a Global Cultures flag.

LAT 398T • Supervised Teaching In Latin

33020 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 1100-1200 UTC 1.136
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This course is designed to introduce graduate students to methods of teaching, especially introductory and intermediate Latin classes. Topics will include planning the course and devising the syllabus, presenting lessons, assigning and evaluating homework, making up and grading quizzes and exams, and other matters of importance.

Grading will be based on class participation and a number of projects.

C C 304C • Intro To Ancient Egypt

32640 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 1100-1200 JES A121A
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An introductory survey of the highlights of Greek and Roman civilization and early Christianity. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required.

LAT 365 • Lucretius

33090 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm WAG 208
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Critical study of authors such as Horace, Livy, Lucretius, and Tacitus.

Prerequisites: Latin 323 with a grade of at least C.

LAT 506 • First-Year Latin I

82250 • Summer 2009
Meets MTWTHF 830-1000 WAG 308
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This course is an introduction to Latin, the language of ancient Rome and famous writers like Caesar, Cicero, Vergil, and St. Augustine. Latin is also an excellent way to improve your command of other languages: Latin is the source of over 60% of English vocabulary, and also the ancestor of all the “Romance” languages of Europe, including French, Italian, Portuguese, and Spanish.

Latin 506 introduces basic grammar and vocabulary in an interesting and challenging format, through reading selections from a wide range of Roman authors and exploring aspects of Roman life and culture.  By the end of the semester, students are reading excerpts from famous works and ready to continue into Latin 507.

The course covers chapters 1-27 of Wheelock’s Latin and also selected readings from 38 Latin Stories. There will be daily assignments, regular quizzes, midterm tests, and a final exam.

Prerequisites: None. Note: This course may not be counted by students offering two or more admission units or any previous college credit in Latin.  

Latin 506 may be counted as partially fulfilling the foreign language requirement, or the General Culture requirement, or as an elective. 

Requirements: Class participation, homework, quizzes, midterm tests, and  a final exam.

Students earning a C or better may advance to Latin 507: First-Year Latin II, where they will read selections from Caesar and other authors. 

 

Texts:

Wheelock, Wheelock's Latin (Harper 6h edition)

Groton & May, 38 Latin Stories (Bolchazy)

Corneau & LeFleur, Workbook to Wheelock's Latin (Harper) optional

Goldman & Szymanski, English Grammar for Students of Latin (Olivia & Hill) (optional)

C C 348 • Ancient Egypt

32080 • Spring 2009
Meets MWF 900-1000 WAG 101
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The development and progress of ancient civilization, including history, philosophy, literature, and culture. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required.

 

LAT 365 • Lucan

32443 • Spring 2009
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm GAR 1.134
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Critical study of authors such as Horace, Livy, Lucretius, and Tacitus.

Prerequisites: Latin 323 with a grade of at least C.

LAT 398T • Supervised Teaching In Latin

32495 • Spring 2009
Meets TTH 930-1100 WAG 308
show description

This course is designed to introduce graduate students to methods of teaching, especially introductory and intermediate Latin classes. Topics will include planning the course and devising the syllabus, presenting lessons, assigning and evaluating homework, making up and grading quizzes and exams, and other matters of importance.

Grading will be based on class participation and a number of projects.

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