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Elizabeth Cullingford, Chair CAL 226, Mailcode B5000, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-4991

Thomas M Cable

Professor Emeritus Ph.D., 1969, University of Texas at Austin

Thomas M Cable

Contact

Interests

History of the English language; rhythms and rhetoric of English poetry.

E 315P • Introduction To Writing Poetry

33940-33955 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm WEL 2.246
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E 315P and 318L (Topic 2: Poetry) may not both be counted.


Course Description: An introduction to creative writing, fiction and poetry.  The course focuses on reading and writing both poetry and short stories. The students will experiment with different techniques through an assigned exercise. As well, we will read examples of fiction and poetry. Students will be expected to participate in discussions of the stories. Each week, the students will write and rewrite an exercise in fiction or poetry. The students will also write one short story (4-5 pages) and a rewrite of that story, as well as a group of six poems, written and rewritten. At each TA section, the students will discuss student work or the assigned reading. Most of the student writing will be critiqued in a workshop setting with TAs—Creative Writing graduate students—leading the discussion. The small-group discussions include peer reviews of student work. Once in the semester, each must meet during office hours with his or her TA. During the twice-weekly meetings of the entire class, students will write in class in response to topics presented by the professors and must be prepared to share that work by reading aloud.  The work handed in to TAs must be double-spaced in type no smaller than 11 point, with reasonable margins for TA comments. Student work must be presented in multiple copies and retained by the student in a folder to be handed in at the end of the semester for final grading.

Texts: David Lodge, The Art of Fiction: Illustrated from Classic and Modern Text (Penguin); Laura Furman, ed., The PEN/O. Henry Prize Stories 2010. David Mason and John Frederick Nims, Western Wind, 5th ed.

Grading: Exercises, 20%; First-draft short story, 10%; Rewritten short story, 20%; First-draft poems, 10%, Rewritten Poems, 20%; Critiques (peer reviews), 10%; Class Participation, 10%. Steady attendance is required. Students may not miss more than two classes without lowering the final grade.

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

E 360K • English Grammar

34725 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 800am-930am PAR 105
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E 360K and LIN 360K may not both be counted.

Course Description: We will study both traditional grammar and generative grammar as alternative, sometimes complementary, ways of understanding English syntax. We will draw dozens of old Reed-Kellogg diagrams and parse sentences until we can take apart and put back together almost any syntactic structure that anyone would want to know about. The attention to linguistics will be less theoretical than applied. The idea will be to illuminate some of the traditional problems of English studies, including style at the level of the sentence

Texts: Emery, Sentence Analysis

Grading: Frequent homework exercises on syntactic structures. Three tests, 27% each; Homework and class participation, 19%.

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing. 

E 364M • History Of English Language

34930 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 800-930 PAR 105
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E/LIN 364M A History of the English Language  (Spring 2010)

Thomas Cable
Calhoun 310; office hours: TT 9:30-11:00

Course Description

This course aims to present the historical development of English by striking a balance between the internal history—sounds, inflections, vocabulary—and the external history—the political, social, and intellectual forces that have determined the course of that development at different periods. The main topics (which will be covered fully in class lecture-discussion) include the Indo-European Family of Languages, Old English, The Norman Conquest and the Subjection of English (1066-1200), The Re-establishment of English (1200-1500), The Renaissance (1500-1650), The Appeal to Authority (1650-1800), The Nineteenth Century and after, and the English Language in America.

Grading and Requirements

Frequent homework exercises on linguistic structures.

Plus/minus grades will be given, and determined on the following basis:

Three tests                        27% each    =   81%
Homework and class participation               19%

Required Texts

Albert C. Baugh and Thomas Cable, A History of the English Language, 5th ed.
Thomas Cable, A Companion to Baugh & Cable's History of the English Language, 3rd ed.

Students with disabilities may request appropriate academic accommodations from the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities, 471-6259.

For more information, please download the full syllabus.

E 360K • English Grammar

35135 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm GAR 2.112
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E 360K: ENGLISH GRAMMAR (Fall 2009)

Thomas Cable
Calhoun 310; office hours: TT 9:30-11:00

Description

We will study both traditional grammar and generative grammar as alternative, sometimes complementary, ways of understanding English syntax. We will draw dozens of old Reed-Kellogg diagrams and parse sentences until we can take apart and put back together almost any syntactic structure that anyone would want to know about. The attention to linguistics will be less theoretical than applied. The idea will be to illuminate some of the traditional problems of English studies, including style at the level of the sentence.

Students with Disabilities:

Students with disabilities may request appropriate academic accommodations from the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities, 471-6259.

For further information, please download the full syllabus.

E 364M • History Of English Language

35160 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 800-930 PAR 206
show description

E/LIN 364M: A History of the English Language (Fall 2009)

Professor Thomas Cable

 

Course Description

This course aims to present the historical development of English by striking a balance between the internal history—sounds, inflections, vocabulary—and the external history—the political, social, and intellectual forces that have determined the course of that development at different periods. The main topics (which will be covered fully in class
lecture-discussion) include the Indo-European Family of Languages, Old English, The Norman Conquest and the Subjection of English (1066-1200), The Re-establishment of English (1200-1500), The Renaissance (1500-1650), The Appeal to Authority (1650-1800), The Nineteenth Century and after, and the English Language in America.

Students with Disabilities:

Students with disabilities may request appropriate academic accommodations from the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities, 471-6259.

For further information, please download the full syllabus.

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