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Elizabeth Cullingford, Chair CAL 226, Mailcode B5000, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-4991

Thomas B Whitbread

Professor Ph.D., 1959, Harvard University

Thomas B Whitbread

Contact

  • Phone: 512-471-8750
  • Office: PAR 216
  • Office Hours: TTH 12:30-1:30 p.m.; 3:30-4:00 p.m.
  • Campus Mail Code: B5000

Biography

Thomas Whitbread's research interests include poetry, poetics, and literary criticism, from Homer to the present, but especially in 20th-c. Britain and America.  He teaches graduate courses in major poets, and undergraduate classes include 20th-c. Poetry, Shakespeare: Selected Plays, and Creative Writing: Poetry.   He is a published writer whose poems and stories have appeared in numerous journals and twenty anthologies, most recently "Literary Austin" and "Literary Dallas." His three books of poems are:  "Four Infinitives"; "Whomp and Moonshiver"; and "The Structures Minds Erect." The first book won, and the second co-won, the annual Poetry Award from the Texas Institute of Letters.

Interests

Poetry, poetics, and literary criticism

E 321 • Shakespeare: Selected Plays

35675 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm PAR 204
show description

Instructor:  Whitbread, T

Unique #:  35675 and 35685

Semester:  Fall

Cross-lists:  n/a

Flags:  Global cultures; Writing

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: We will read twelve major plays of Shakespeare representative of comedies, tragedies, histories, problem plays, and late romances. We will read them in chronological order, to see the Bard's development as poet-dramatist. My approach will involve a combination of lecture and discussion.

Texts: The Necessary Shakespeare, ed. David Bevington, 4th edition (Pearson, 2014)

Grading & Requirements: One term paper, 7-10 pages; two short papers 6-7 pages. Papers, 90%; Class participation, 10%. No final exam.

E 321 • Shakespeare: Selected Plays

35685 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm PAR 103
show description

Instructor:  Whitbread, T

Unique #:  35675 and 35685

Semester:  Fall

Cross-lists:  n/a

Flags:  Global cultures; Writing

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: We will read twelve major plays of Shakespeare representative of comedies, tragedies, histories, problem plays, and late romances. We will read them in chronological order, to see the Bard's development as poet-dramatist. My approach will involve a combination of lecture and discussion.

Texts: The Necessary Shakespeare, ed. David Bevington, 4th edition (Pearson, 2014)

Grading & Requirements: One term paper, 7-10 pages; two short papers 6-7 pages. Papers, 90%; Class participation, 10%. No final exam.

E 341L • Poetry Workshop

35975 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm CAL 323
show description

Instructor:  Whitbread, T

Unique #:  35975

Semester:  Spring 2014

Cross-lists:  n/a

Prerequisites: E 325P.

Description: This course offers further experience in writing and revising poems. Each student will distribute eight to ten poems during the semester, to be collected, with revisions, in an end-of-semester sheaf. Workshop meetings will feature critiques and helpful suggestions made by all of us; in addition, I will give written commentary on each poem submitted. At times I'll augment discussions with handouts of poems as stimuli and as examples of techniques to try doing.

Texts: No text required.

Requirements and Grading: 90% of the grade is based on the quality of each student's poems, 10% on class participation. No final exam.

Documented Disability Statement: The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities. For more information, contact Services for Students with Disabilities at 471-6259 (voice) or 232-2937 (video phone) or http://www.utexas.edu/diversity/ddce/ssd.

E 371K • Twentieth-Century Poetry

36165 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm PAR 204
show description

Instructor:  Whitbread, T

Unique #:  36165

Semester:  Spring 2014

Cross-lists:  n/a

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: We study poems by 12 or 15 major twentieth-century poets, British and American. We read poems closely as individual works of verbal art, and consider them in relation to other poems and to the authors' lives and times. Our aim is knowledge, appreciation, and understanding of the diverse and interlinked achievements of modern poets, and of the nature of poetry. Some lecturing; much discussion.

Texts: The Norton Anthology of Modern and Contemporary Poetry, edd. Ramazani-Ellmann-O’Clair, volumns 1 and 2.

Requirements & Grading: One analytical paper (6 pages); one comparative paper (6-7 pages); one term paper (7-10 pages); no final exam.

Papers, 90%; class participation, 10%.

E 325P • Poetry Writing

35735 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm PAR 302
show description

Instructor:  Whitbread, T            Areas:  IV / U

Unique #:  35735            Flags:  Writing

Semester:  Fall 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: C L 315, E 603B, 316K, or T C 603B.

Description: Our aim is to encourage students who want to write poetry and to help them improve their skills through: (1) Class discussions of one another's poems; (2) Analysis of selected poems by noted poets that show 
diverse kinds of achievements and suggest possibilities for the students' own experimentation and development; (3) Conferences with the teacher.

At each class meeting, starting TH Sept. 1 and ending TH Dec. 1, class members read and give constructive criticism of each other's poems, and I join in. I also hand back written critiques and suggestions I have put on copies of their poems, and revisions thereof, that they continuously give me throughout the semester.

Texts: No text required. Student poets duplicate and distribute to each of us copies of new poems to be discussed, at a rate of two poems per three weeks.

Requirements & Grading: 90% of the grade is based on the quality and improvement of each student's poems (a sheaf of 8-10 poems is required at semester's end). 10% is based on class participation. Plus/minus grades may be assigned in apt instances. No final exam.

Disability Accommodation: The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities. For more information, contact Services for Students with Disabilities at 471-6259 (voice) or 232-2937 (video phone).

E 325P • Poetry Writing

35375 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm PAR 210
show description

Instructor:  Whitbread, T            Areas:  IV / U

Unique #:  35375            Flags:  Writing

Semester:  Spring 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: C L 315, E 603B, 316K, or T C 603B.

Description: Our aim is to encourage students who want to write poetry and to help them improve their skills through: (1) Class discussions of one another's poems; (2) Analysis of selected poems by noted poets that show 
diverse kinds of achievements and suggest possibilities for the students' own experimentation and development; (3) Conferences with the teacher.

At each class meeting, starting TH Sept. 1 and ending TH Dec. 1, class members read and give constructive criticism of each other's poems, and I join in. I also hand back written critiques and suggestions I have put on copies of their poems, and revisions thereof, that they continuously give me throughout the semester.

Texts: No text required. Student poets duplicate and distribute to each of us copies of new poems to be discussed, at a rate of two poems per three weeks.

Requirements & Grading: 90% of the grade is based on the quality and improvement of each student's poems (a sheaf of 8-10 poems is required at semester's end). 10% is based on class participation. Plus/minus grades may be assigned in apt instances. No final exam.

Disability Accommodation: The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities. For more information, contact Services for Students with Disabilities at 471-6259 (voice) or 232-2937 (video phone).

E 341L • Poetry Workshop

35440 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm PAR 302
show description

Instructor:  Whitbread, T            Areas:  IV / U

Unique #:  35440            Flags:  Writing

Semester:  Spring 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: E 325P.

Description: This course offers further experience in writing and revising poems. Each student will distribute eight to ten poems during the semester, to be collected, with revisions, in an end-of-semester sheaf. Workshop meetings will feature critiques and helpful suggestions made by all of us; in addition, I will give written commentary on each poem submitted. At times I'll augment discussions with handouts of poems as stimuli and as examples of techniques to try doing.

Texts: No text required.

Requirements and Grading: 90% of the grade is based on the quality of each student's poems, 10% on class participation. No final exam.

Documented Disability Statement: The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities. For more information, contact Services for Students with Disabilities at 471-6259 (voice) or 232-2937 (video phone) or http://www.utexas.edu/diversity/ddce/ssd.

E 325P • Poetry Writing

35350 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm PAR 204
show description

Instructor:  Whitbread, T            Areas:  IV / U

Unique #:  35350            Flags:  Writing

Semester:  Fall 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: C L 315, E 603B, 316K, or T C 603B.

Description: Our aim is to encourage students who want to write poetry and to help them improve their skills through: (1) Class discussions of one another's poems; (2) Analysis of selected poems by noted poets that show 
diverse kinds of achievements and suggest possibilities for the students' own experimentation and development; (3) Conferences with the teacher.

At each class meeting, starting TH Sept. 1 and ending TH Dec. 1, class members read and give constructive criticism of each other's poems, and I join in. I also hand back written critiques and suggestions I have put on copies of their poems, and revisions thereof, that they continuously give me throughout the semester.

Texts: No text required. Student poets duplicate and distribute to each of us copies of new poems to be discussed, at a rate of two poems per three weeks.

Requirements & Grading: 90% of the grade is based on the quality and improvement of each student's poems (a sheaf of 8-10 poems is required at semester's end). 10% is based on class participation. Plus/minus grades may be assigned in apt instances. No final exam.

Disability Accommodation: The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities. For more information, contact Services for Students with Disabilities at 471-6259 (voice) or 232-2937 (video phone).

E 371K • Twentieth-Century Poetry

35445 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm PAR 103
show description

Instructor:  Whitbread, T            Areas:  III / U

Unique #:  35445            Flags:  Writing

Semester:  Spring 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: We study poems by 12 or 15 major twentieth-century poets, British and American. We read poems closely as individual works of verbal art, and consider them in relation to other poems and to the authors' lives and times. Our aim is knowledge, appreciation, and understanding of the diverse and interlinked achievements of modern poets, and of the nature of poetry. Some lecturing; much discussion. 

Texts: The Norton Anthology of Modern and Contemporary Poetry, edd. Ramazani-Ellmann-O’Clair, volumns 1 and 2.

Requirements & Grading: One analytical paper (6 pages); one comparative paper (6-7 pages); one term paper (7-10 pages); no final exam.

Papers, 90%; class participation, 10%.

E 379R • Imagination In 20th-Cen Poetry

35530 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm PAR 103
show description

Instructor:  Whitbread, T            Areas:  VI / I

Unique #:  35530            Flags:  Writing; Independent Inquiry

Semester:  Spring 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: Wallace Stevens, Elizabeth Bishop, and Galway Kinnell are three of the most diverse, challenging, and rewarding major poets of the 20th century. Their poems and poetics are a fertile field for research and discoveries. We shall read widely in the poetry, interpreting individual poems as themselves, in relation to one another within each author's work, and in terms of comparison/contrast between authors, with references outward to shared antecedents and contemporaries. We'll focus intensively on specific poems selected to plumb each poet's range, depth, idiosyncrasies and excellences.

Texts (all paperbacks): Wallace Stevens, THE PALM AT THE END OF THE MIND (Vintage); Elizabeth Bishop, THE COMPLETE POEMS 1927-1979 (Farrar-Straus-Giroux) or POEMS (2011); Galway Kinnell, A NEW SELECTED POEMS (Houghton Mifflin).

Requirements & Grading: Two 6-7 pp. interpretive analytical essays and one 9-12 pp. research paper, counting for 20%, 30%, and 40% of the grade, respectively. Class participation counts for 10% of the grade. Due dates: TBA. Plus/minus grades may be assigned. No final exam.

* Disability Accommodation: The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request apt academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities. For more information, contact Services for Students with Disabilities at 471-6259 (voice) or 232-2937 (video phone).

E 380F • Literature For Writers

35570 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm CAL 221
show description

Wallace Stevens, James Merrill, and Adrienne Rich are major, prolific, diversely challenging and  rewarding poets of the 20th (and, for Rich, 21st) century. Anne Carson as one of the most original, witty, freshly imaginative poets currently publishing.  We'll read many of Stevens', Merrill's, and Rich's poems, selected to plumb each poet's range, depths, idiosyncrasies, and ways of expressing a sense of self both in and not quite fully of this world.  We'll also closely read Carson's 149-op. "Novel in Verse," AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF RED.  We'll discuss these works in themselves, in relation to one another, and in regard to what may be the changing means and ends of poems and to the possible value of poetry in 2011.

One short (6-7 pp.) interpretive essay, due five weeks into the semester.  One longer (10-12 pp.) essay due late in semester.  Part of the longer essay should focus on particular qualities of technique in the authors' poetic performances that you find useful, even inspirational, to your creative writing.  Much class discussion.  No final exam.

Required texts (all paperbacks)

Wallace Stevens, THE PALM AT THE END OF THE MIND (Random House Vintage, 1990).

James Merrill, SELECTED POEMS (Knopf, 2009).

ADRIENNE RICH'S POETRY AND PROSE (Norton Critical Edition, 1993).

Anne Carson, AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF RED (Random House Vintage Contemporaries, 1999).

E 371K • Twentieth-Century Poetry

35755 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm PAR 103
show description

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Course Description: We study poems by 12 or 15 major twentieth-century poets, British and American. We read poems closely as individual works of verbal art, and consider them in relation to other poems and to the authors' lives and times. Our aim is knowledge, appreciation, and understanding of the diverse and interlinked achievements of modern poets, and of the nature of poetry. Some lecturing; much discussion.

Texts: The Norton Anthology of Modern and Contemporary Poetry, edd. Ramazani-Ellmann-O’Clair, volumns 1 and 2.

Grading: One analytical paper (6 pages); one comparative paper (6-7 pages); one term paper (7-10 pages); no final exam.

Papers, 90%; class participation, 10%.

E 379R • Imagination In 20th-Cen Poetry

35842 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm PAR 103
show description

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Course Description: Wallace Stevens, Elizabeth Bishop, and Galway Kinnell are three of the most diverse, challenging, and rewarding major poets of the 20th century. Their poems and poetics are a fertile field for research and discoveries. We shall read widely in the poetry, interpreting individual poems as themselves, in relation to one another within each author's work, and in terms of comparison/contrast between authors, with references outward to shared antecedents and contemporaries. We'll focus intensively on specific poems selected to plumb each poet's range, depth, idiosyncrasies and excellences.

Texts (all paperbacks): Wallace Stevens, THE PALM AT THE END OF THE MIND (Vintage); Elizabeth Bishop, THE COMPLETE POEMS 1927-1979 (Farrar-Straus-Giroux); Galway Kinnell, A NEW SELECTED POEMS (Houghton Mifflin).

Grading: Two 6-7 pp. interpretive analytical essays and one 9-12 pp. research paper, counting for 20%, 30%, and 40% of the grade, respectively. Class participation counts for 10% of the grade. Due dates: TBA. Plus/minus grades may be assigned. No final exam.* Disability Accommodation: The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request apt academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities. For more information, contact Services for Students with Disabilities at 471-6259 (voice) or 232-2937 (video phone).

E 341L • Poetry Workshop

34620 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm PAR 310
show description

Course Description: This course offers further experience in writing and revising poems. Each student will distribute eight to ten poems during the semester, to be collected, with revisions, in an end-of-semester sheaf. Workshop meetings will feature critiques and helpful suggestions made by all of us; in addition, I will give written commentary on each poem submitted. At times I'll augment discussions with handouts of poems as stimuli and as examples of techniques to try doing.

At each class meeting, class members read and give constructive criticism of each others' poems, and I join in. I also hand back written critiques and suggestions I have put on copies of their poems, and revisions thereof, that they continuously give me throughout the semester.

Disability Accommodation: The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request apt academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities. For more information, contact Services for Students with Disabilities at 471-6259 (voice) or 232-2937 (video phone).

Texts: No text required.

Grading: 90% of the grade is based on the quality of each student's poems, 10% on class participation. No final exam.

Prerequisites: English 325P.

E 379R • Imagination In 20th-Cen Poetry

34950 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm CAL 323
show description

Course Description: Wallace Stevens, Elizabeth Bishop, and Galway Kinnell are three of the most diverse, challenging, and rewarding major poets of the 20th century. Their poems and poetics are a fertile field for research and discoveries. We shall read widely in the poetry, interpreting individual poems as themselves, in relation to one another within each author's work, and in terms of comparison/contrast between authors, with references outward to shared antecedents and contemporaries. We'll focus intensively on specific poems selected to plumb each poet's range, depth, idiosyncrasies and excellences.

Texts (all paperbacks): Wallace Stevens, THE PALM AT THE END OF THE MIND (Vintage); Elizabeth Bishop, THE COMPLETE POEMS 1927-1979 (Farrar-Straus-Giroux); Galway Kinnell, A NEW SELECTED POEMS (Houghton Mifflin).

Grading: Two 6-7 pp. interpretive analytical essays and one 9-12 pp. research paper, counting for 20%, 30%, and 40% of the grade, respectively. Class participation counts for 10% of the grade. Plus/minus grades may be assigned. No final exam.

Disability Accommodation: The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request apt academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities. For more information, contact Services for Students with Disabilities at 471-6259 (voice) or 232-2937 (video phone).

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

For more information, please download the full syllabus.

E 325 • Creative Writing: Poetry-W

34730 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 1200-100pm PAR 103
show description

E325, Creative Wrtiting: Poetry (34730)

MWF 12:00 – 1:00PM, PAR 103
Prof. Thomas Whitbread
PAR 216, Office Hours: MWF 10:30?11:30

* Course Description: Our aim is to encourage students who want to write poetry and to help them improve their skills through: (1) Class discussions of one another's poems; (2) Analysis of selected poems by noted poets that show
diverse kinds of achievements and suggest possibilities for the students' own experimentation and development; and (3) Conferences with the teacher.

* Prerequisite: Nine semester hours in English or rhetoric and writing.

*** Grading: 90% of the grade is based on the quality and improvement of each student's poems (a sheaf of 8?10 poems is required at semester's end). 10% is based on class participation. Plus/minus grades may be assigned in apt instances. No final exam.

* No text required. Student poets duplicate and distribute to each of us copies of new poems to be discussed, at a rate of two poems per three weeks.

*Disability Accommodation: The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities. For more information, contact Services for Students with Disabilities at 471?6259 (voice) or 232?2937 (video phone).

At each class meeting, starting W Jan 20 and ending F May 7, class members read and give constructive criticism of each other's poems, and I join in. I also hand back written critiques and suggestions I have put on copies of their poems, and revisions thereof, that they continuously give me throughout the semester.

E 371K • Twentieth-Century Poetry-W

34975 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm PAR 204
show description

E371K, Twentieth Century Poetry (34975)

MWF, 2:00 – 3:00 PM, PAR 204
Prof. Thomas Whitbread
PAR 216, OFFICE HOURS: MWF 10:30?11:30

* Course Description: We study poems by 25 or 30 major twentieth?century poets, British and American. We interpret poems closely as individual works of verbal art, and consider them in relation to other poems and to the authors' lives
and times. Our aim is knowledge, appreciation, and understanding of the diverse and interlinked achievements of modern poets, and of the nature of poetry. Both lecturing and discussion.

 

For more information, please download the full syllabus.

E 321 • Shakespeare: Selected Plays-W

34990 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm PAR 208
show description

E321, Shakespeare: Selected Plays (34990)

Professor Thomas Whitbread

PAR 216, Office Hours: TTH 1:30 - 3:00 PM.

*Course Description: With close, analytical attention to language and dramatic structures, we read and come to know eleven of Shakestreare's plays, including comedies, histories, tragedies, and late romances. We take the plays in chronological order, to see the Bard's development as poet/dramatist. They are: A Midsummer Night's Dream; Richard II; Henry IV, 1; Hamlet; Twelfth Night; Othello; King Lear; Macbeth; Antony and Cleopatra; The Winter's Tale; and The Tempest. Each class involves both lecture and discussion.

 

For more information, please download the full syllabus.

Publications

Whitbread, T. (2007) The Structures Minds Erect. Pecan Grove Press.

Whitbread, T. (1982) Whomp and Moonshiver. BOA Editions. Co-winner, Annual Poetry Award from the Texas Institute of Letters.

Whitbread, T. (1964) Four Infinitives. Harper & Row. Winner, Annual Poetry Award from the Texas Institute of Letters.

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