Skip Navigation
UT wordmark
College of Liberal Arts wordmark
english masthead
english masthead
Elizabeth Cullingford, Chair CAL 226, Mailcode B5000, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-4991

Marjorie Curry Woods

Professor Ph.D., U. of Toronto

Blumberg Centennial Professor of English and University Distinguished Teaching Professor
Marjorie Curry Woods

Contact

Biography

Professor Marjorie (Jorie) Woods grew up in the military and moved almost every year. Changing schools so often generated her interest in teaching, and she studies both how students were taught to write in medieval schools, and the use of premodern classroom exercises in the modern classroom. In 2010 she published her decades-long study of the teachers' notes in margins of the manuscripts of a medieval rhetorical treatise, entitled Classroom Commentaries: Teaching the Poetria nova across Medieval and Renaissance Europe. Currently she is working on how female characters from classical texts were studied and used as the basis of composition exercises for boys during the Middle Ages and the Renaissance.

Awards and Honors:

At UT she has received a Humanites Research Award, the Harry Ransom Award for Teaching Excellence, the University President's Associates' Teaching Excellence Award, and the Chad Oliver Plan II Teaching Award. Jorie Woods is the recipient of fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the National Humanities Center, and the Center for Epigraphical and Palaeographical Studies at The Ohio State University, as well as research grants from the American Council of Learned Societies and the American Philosophical Society. An Early Commentary on the Poetria nova of Geoffrey of Vinsauf (1985) received Honorable Mention for the John Nicholas Brown Award of the Medieval Academy of America. Her latest book, Classroom Commentaries: Teaching the Poetria nova across Medieval and Renaissance Europe, has been awarded the 2010 Rhetoric Society of America Book Award. She received the Rome Prize in Renaissance and Early Modern Studies from the American Academy in Rome, where she spent 2007-2008 working on her next book project, Weeping for Dido: Male Writers and Female Emotions in the Medieval and Renaissance Classroom. She continued working on this project as a Member of the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton during 2011-2012.

Representative Publications:

"What Are the Real Differences between Medieval and Renaissance Commentaries?" In The Classics in the Medieval and Renaissance Classroom. Turnhout: Brepols, 2013.

Co-authored with Martin Camargo. "Writing Instruction in Late Medieval Europe." A Short History of Writing Instruction. 3rd edition. New York: Routledge, 2012.

Classroom Commentaries: Teaching the Poetria nova across Medieval and Renaissance Europe. Ohio State University Press, 2010.

"Rhetoric, Gender, and the Literary Arts: Classical Speeches in the Schoolroom." New Medieval Literatures 11 (2009).

"You May Have Changed My Life." English Language Notes 4 (2009). Special Issue on Experimental Literary Pedagogy.

"A Medieval Rhetorical Manual in the 17th Century: The Case of Christian Daum and the Poetria nova." Classica et Beneventana: Essays Presented to Virginia Brown on the Occasion of Her 65th Birthday. 2007.

''Boys Will Be Women: Musings on Classroom Nostalgia and the Chaucerian Audience(s).'' Speaking Images: Essays in Honor of V.A. Kolve. 2001.

“Rape and the Pedagogical Rhetoric of Sexual Violence.” Criticism and Dissent in the Middle Ages. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996.

An Early Commentary on the Poetria nova of Geoffrey of Vinsauf. Garland Medieval Texts 12. New York: Garland Publishing, Inc., 1985

 

Interests

Medieval literature; medieval and renaissance rhetoric and pedagogy; composition exercises in premodern classroom; modern use of premodern compostion exercises

E 350E • Clascl/Sriptl Bckgrnd Of Lit

36055 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm PAR 302
show description

Instructor:  Woods, M

Unique #:  36055

Semester:  Spring 2014

Cross-lists:  n/a

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: EPIC BACKGROUNDS OF ENGLISH LITERATURE. We will spend the semester reading translations of four of the greatest and most influential works in the western tradition: Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, Virgil’s Aeneid, and Lucan’s Civil War. Each of these works alone could occupy an entire course, yet they are also interrelated, so that reading them in sequence offers special insights and pleasures. Our main focus in class discussions will be the texts themselves, on how they have been read for centuries and on new, current ways of analyzing and assessing them. At the same time we'll be working on a variety of writing skills: creative, analytical, and scholarly, and preparing research papers based on student interests. We will also take a trip to the Ransom Center to look at medieval manuscripts and rare printed copies of these works.

Required Texts: Homer, Iliad; Ovid, Essential Metamorphases; Virgil, Essential Aeneid; Lucan, Civil War (Pharsalia); MLA Handbook (7th edition)

Requirements & Grading: There will several written assignments. The first (3-5 pages) is an analysis of a scholarly article or a comparison of translations of a passage or a creative rewriting of an episode (student's choice); this paper may be revised. Each student will write a research paper of 13-15 pages, which will be submitted first for peer review and then revised. The subject of this paper will be determined individually by each student in consultation with the professor. The third paper will be an annotated bibliography (4-5 pages) based on the materials consulted for the research paper.

Attendance and participation in class discussion are required. Each student will make an oral presentation with one-page handout and discussion questions on the assigned readings for at least one class, and a final short presentation on the research project.

Class attendance, discussion, and presentation: 40%; Written work: 60%.

E 392M • Boys Being Women:the Classroom

36145 • Fall 2013
Meets MW 900am-1030am CAL 419
(also listed as MDV 392M, WGS 393 )
show description

Boys Being Women:

Rhetoric, Gender, and Emotion in the Classroom

Women’s emotions in Virgil’s Aeneid were an important part of the school experiences of St. Augustine. As he tells us in the Confessions, he “grieved for Dido, slain as she sought by the sword an end to her woe,” and one of his school assignments was to rewrite in prose and perform his version of Juno’s speech expressing her “grief and rage that she could not keep the Trojan prince [Aeneas] from coming to Italy…” (Conf. 1.13 and 17). Augustine was not alone in this experience. Many schoolboys in the ancient, late antique, medieval, and early modern periods performed and composed speeches by very emotional literary (and, in the byzantine tradition, biblical) characters, often women, as an integral part of their study of rhetoric. These speeches and the pedagogical tradition to which they belong will be the object of our study this semester.

From the point of view of the history of creativity, the most important aspect of this tradition is the element of fantasy and projection on the part of the students. We will examine the psychological implications and pedagogical usefulness of such training both in historical terms and also with regard to how some of these exercises might be modified for our own classrooms, where we encounter some surprisingly similar issues. Recent research on memory, empathy, and emotion will form part of our discussions.

Emotion filtered through the lens of gender was a key component of the internalization of texts, with profound effects both in the classroom and on female characterization by adult writers like Chaucer, and as Lynn Enterline’s recent Shakespeare’s Schoolroom suggests. Centuries earlier, Statius’s unfinished Achilleid presented a young Achilles whose gender- (and species-)bending adolescence was found so useful by medieval teachers that they completed the work and made hundreds of copies of it. New translations and recent scholarship reveal a rich and textured history of experimentation in crossing boundaries for pedagogical purposes. We will add to this scholarship even as we investigate what insights into the modern classroom knowledge about this tradition may give us.

The course is open to graduate students at all levels and should be useful for and accessible to those in a number of disciplines. It functions as both as an approach to premodern texts via a thematic core and also a survey of a significant part of the western rhetorical, literary, and pedagogical tradition rarely studied as a whole.

All required readings will be in English, but a number of surviving student exercises from the earlier periods are still untranslated. Thus, translation projects as well as analyses from any historical, methodological, or theoretical approach will be welcome as topics for the research paper required of each student.

Written assignments will include a short paper (either creative or analytical) at the beginning of the semester, followed by a research paper submitted in two drafts. I like to have as wide a variety of students in my classes as possible, and those focusing on later periods will be allowed to write their research papers on material relating to their own areas of study. Each student’s topic will be worked out in consultation with the professor. Students will make two informal presentations, one on the readings for a particular class and another at the end on the research paper.

Preliminary list of readings:

Several books of Virgil’s Aeneid and selections from Augustine’s Confessions.

Statius, Achilleid in a new translation now in preparation; selections from recent critical studies Transvestite Achilles and Achilles in Love.

Libanius, Exercises in a Speech in Character.

Aphthonius, Progymnasmata (graded rhetorical exercises); selections on emotional speeches from other rhetorical handbooks.

Chaucer, selected short texts or Troilus and Criseyde.

Shakespeare, As You Like It and/or Marlowe, Dido, Queen of Carthage.

Enterline, Shakespeare’s Schoolroom.

McGaugh, Memory and Emotion.

Essays by Suzanne Keen, Jeffrey Walker, Raffaella Cribiore, Manfred Kraus, Eugenio Amato and Gianluca Ventrella, Federica Ciccolella, Vessela Valiavitcharska, Jan Ziolkowski, and Marjorie Curry Woods.

[The final list of readings will be determined by the interests and strengths of the students.]

E 350E • Clascl/Sriptl Bckgrnd Of Lit

35525 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm MEZ 2.202
show description

Instructor:  Woods, M            Areas:  II / D

Unique #:  35525            Flags:  Writing

Semester:  Spring 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  LAH 350            Computer Instruction:  n/a

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: This version of E 350E will concentrate on EPIC BACKGROUNDS OF ENGLISH LITERATURE. We will spend the semester reading translations of four of the greatest and most influential works in the western tradition: Homer's Iliad and sections of the Odyssey, Virgils' Aeneid, and Ovid's Metamorphosis. Each of these works alone could occupy an entire course, yet they are also interrelated, so that reading them in sequence offers special insights and pleasures. Our main focus in class discussions will be the texts themselves, on how they have been read for centuries and on new, current ways of analyzing and assessing them. At the same time we'll be working on a variety of writing skills: creative, analytical, and scholarly.

Required Texts: Homer, Iliad; Homer, Odyssey (selections); Virgil, Aeneid; Ovid, Metamorphoses.

Requirements & Grading: There will three written assignments. Two will be short and may be revised. The first (3-5 pages) is an analysis of a scholarly article or a comparison of translations of a passage or a creative rewriting of an episode (student's choice). The second (3-4 pages) is an annotated bibliography based on the materials in the HRC and scholarly databases, which will form the basis of the research paper. Each student will write a research paper of 13-15 pages, which must be submitted in both rough draft as well as final form. The subject of this paper will be determined individually by each student in consultation with the professor.

Attendance and participation in class discussion are required. Each student will make an oral presentation with one-page handout and discussion questions on the assigned readings for at least one class.

Class attendance, discussion, and presentation: 40%; Written work: 60%.

E 603A • Comp And Reading In World Lit

34530 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 930am-1100am CRD 007A
show description

Reading a book can change your life. For many, a book has provided a formative experience that shaped personality, led to a conversion experience, or provided guidance in a time of crisis. 

During the first semester we will explore early classics of the western tradition that have enlightened or guided many readers—works that inspired extreme reactions almost immediately and for centuries afterward.

For the spring semester, the books will be chosen in consultation with the students.  There will be some guidelines and an attempt to pick texts that work well together, continuing some of the themes developed during the first semester.  However, the focus and specific works will be decided on by each class.

Texts/Readings:

Fall

Homer, The Iliad

Hesiod, Theogony, or Euripides, Helen (student choice)

Sappho, Poems and Fragments

Plato, The Symposium

Virgil, The Aeneid

Augustine, Confessions (selections)

 

Spring (selected works chosen by students in recent years)

De Troyes, Arthurian Romances

Pa Chin, The Family

Kanafani, Men in the Sun

Murakami, Kafka on the Shore

Dangarembga, Nervous Conditions

Lahiri, Interpreter of Maladies

Müller, Land of Green Plums

Assignments:

Students will be required to write three analytical or creative papers of 3-5 pages each during the first semester. The first two papers will go through rigorous peer review before submission, and the last one can be revised if turned in early. During the second semester, different kinds of papers of approximately the same length will be assigned; two will incorporate some research and reading of scholarly articles; the third will be an open topic, which can be an autobiographical essay on an important reading experience. Peer review will be conducted during the second semester as well. There will be NO extensions on paper deadlines. Classes will be conducted by discussion and close reading of texts. Each student will be responsible for one or two short informal oral presentations per semester as well as regular class participation. Attendance is required, but, I hope, enjoyable.

About the Professor:

Marjorie Curry Woods is a medievalist specializing in school texts, especially literary works, and the history of teaching. Her wider interests include the history of reading and the transmission of knowledge, especially classical texts. Currently she is writing a book on the long western tradition of schoolboys writing and performing speeches in the voices of female characters from literature. For fun she likes to travel, watch sports, learn languages, and listen to live music, especially in Austin. Learn more about her from her UT website:

http://www.utexas.edu/cola/depts/english/faculty/woodsmc

E 387R • Medieval Rhetoric And Poetics

35805 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm PAR 310
show description

 

 

 

This course will explore the development of key medieval theoretical and practical ideas about writing, whether in verse or prose, through close readings of rhetorical treatises, arts of poetry, manuals of letter-writing and preaching, and a significant literary text. Medieval composition theory and practice were based on a pedagogy that focused on craft and effect (including affect), and that began with poetry, moving to prose later in the curriculum. While some of the most well-known medieval rhetorical treatises focus on religious issues, most of the work of the writing classroom drew heavily on classical models and treatises.

We will examine the rhetorical uses of poetry as well as the aesthetic considerations of rhetoric. The assigned readings will introduce you to various ways that rhetoric was interpreted and used during the Middle Ages, especially in its intersection with literature and overlap with poetics. (The most popular and influential medieval rhetorical treatise was written in verse and based in part on a classical art of poetry, while the medieval theory and practice of literary characterization was based on Ciceronian rhetorical doctrine.) We will experiment with several medieval composition exercises in class to help us determine the impact of the practice, as well as the theories, of medieval rhetoric and poetics.

As a means of deepening our consideration of how such issues were framed during the Middle Ages, we will also look at modern theoretical treatments of similar questions to establish a fruitful dialogue between the articulation of such concerns in medieval and modern discourses.

The direction of the course in the last weeks of the semester will be determined by the particular interests of the students in the class. Students in Creative Writing and those focusing on other historical periods are welcome, and I will work out a relevant research topic with each student individually.

Written assignments include a short analytical or creative assignment, an annotated bibliography covering the reading for class as well as research interests, and a research paper to be turned in both in rough draft and final form. There will be no extensions, and class attendance is required. Each student will present a short oral report based on the reading assignments in a particular class, as well as a longer oral presentation of his or her research project.

E 350E • Women In Love-Honors

35620 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm PAR 304
show description

E 350E (Topic: Women in Love-Honors) and 379N (Topic: Women in Love-Honors) may not both be counted.

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: Women in Love: Sappho, Dido, Heloise – In this course we will examine the changing reactions to three women whose emotions have shaped the way love is expressed and defined in the western tradition. The first, Sappho, was one of the most admired lyric poets of the ancient world. Her works have come down to us almost entirely as fragments, either short quotations in studies by ancient grammarians and literary critics or literal fragments from papyrus trash heaps or broken pottery. Dido was a literary character created for the western tradition by Virgil in the Aeneid. For many readers her tragic story is the emotional heart of the epic and the focus of interpretations of the protagonist, Aeneas. The third is Heloise, according to some accounts the most learned woman of the Middle Ages and the lover of Abelard, who before and during much of their relationship was the most controversial teacher and scholar in Europe. The authenticity of their letters has often been challenged, and Heloise has been criticized as "too masculine" or "too feminine."

Thus, we will be working with both fictional women and historical female personages from several periods, all of whom have generated substantial amounts of criticism, analysis, and (re)interpretation, in fictional as well as scholarly form. We will examine how both the association of women with particular kinds of emotions and also the changing attitudes toward sexual mores have influenced supposedly objective analyses and evaluations of the works that these women wrote or appeared in and their changing status in the western canon.

Texts: Sappho, Poems and Fragments; Virgil, selections from the Aeneid; Ovid, selections from the Heroides; Augustine, selections from The Confessions; Abelard, The Story of My Misfortunes; The Letters of Heloise and Abelard; Purcell, Dido and Aeneas (opera); DeJean, Fictions of Sappho, 1546-1937; Desmond, Reading Dido: Gender, Textuality, and the Medieval Aeneid; D'Arcens and Ruys, selections from Maistresse of My Wit: Medieval Women, Modern Scholars; Mews, Abelard and Heloise; Woods, "Weeping for Dido". We will also watch films of several performances of recent productions related to these figures and analyze the iconography of their depictions in other visual media.

Requirements & Grading: There will three written assignments based on the figures of study in the course. Two will be quite short and may be revised. The first (2-3 pages) is a review of a scholarly article. The second (3-4 pages) is an annotated bibliography based on the materials in the HRC and scholarly databases. (This second paper will probably form the basis of the research paper.) Each student will write a research paper of at least 10-12 pages, which must be submitted in both rough draft as well as final form. The subject of this paper will be determined individually by each student in consultation with the professor. Attendance is required. Each student will make a presentation with one-page handout and discussion questions on the assigned readings for at least one class.

Class attendance, discussion, and presentation: 40%; Written work: 60%.

E 326K • Lit Of Middle Ages In Transltn

34560 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm PAR 310
show description

Course Description: In this course we study a series of works with conflicting depictions of and attitudes toward love, sex, martyrdom, romance, sexuality (including virginity), rape, and seduction. Whenever possible we compare texts written by men with similar texts written by women.

Texts: We begin with the third-century Dream Visions of Perpetua (thought to be the earliest surviving autobiographical text by a woman), and a fifth-century pagan romance, Apollonius of Tyre, an early version of a story popular throughout the Middle Ages and into the Renaissance. Our transition to later medieval works is two works by Hrotsvit of Gandersheim, who lived the tenth century and wrote adventure dramas about early Christian virgin martyrs. The main focus of the course is a series of twelfth-century texts of different genres that treat aspects of the main themes of the course. As part of our studies we will read two earlier sources for medieval imagery of love and desire: Book IV of Virgil’s Aeneid and the biblical Song of Songs (also known as the Song of Solomon). We will take up the theme of martyrdom again in examining Hebrew martyrdom poems written in response to attacks on Jews in northern France. We finish with a comparison of the lais of Marie de France with one of the chivalric romances of Chrétien de Troyes. One week during the semester will be devoted to medieval manuscripts. We will read a book on how they were made, visit the collection at the Harry Ransom Center, and learn how to make transcriptions (an in-class, ungraded exercise).

Grading: Students will write three papers (3-5 pages each). Each assignment will include a creative as well as an analytical option, and students will be required to write one of each. The students will be able to revise the first two papers (more than once); the final paper can be revised only if submitted early. All students will revise at least one paper. We will discuss the best papers in class, and students will also peer review one another’s papers individually or in small teams. In addition, we will discuss writing assignments often in class as students are preparing them and brainstorm together on various approaches. Because there are no exams and class is conducted by discussion, attendance is mandatory and class participation will be an important part of your grade. Each student will also present one informal report on the reading assigned for one class in order to initiate class discussion; a one-page handout will be a requirement for this oral assignment. Class discussion and the oral report, 40%; Written work, 60%.

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

E 379S • Senior Seminar-W

35155 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm GAR 2.124
show description

 

Senior Seminar:  Medieval Women Readers and Writers in England

     E379S 35155, Spring 2010, T/Th 12:30-1:45 PM, GAR 2.214
     Marjorie Curry Woods, marjoriewoods@austin.utexas.edu
     Office hours (may be changed): Tuesdays, 2-4 PM and by appt., Calhoun 218 (471-8380)
           

¤ REQUIRED BOOKS:

The Letters of Abelard and Heloise, including Abelard's Historia Calamitatum (Penguin; revised edition by Clanchy, 2003)
Life of Christina of Markyate (Oxford)
The Lais of Marie de France (Penguin)
Millett and Wogan-Browne, Medieval English Prose for Women (MEPW [Oxford])
De Hamel, Scribes and Illuminators (U of Toronto)
Book of Margery Kemp (Norton Critical Edition, ed. Staley)
MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers, 6th ed.

¤ NOTES:

There will be no midterm or final examination. Therefore, attendance and participation in class discussion are required and constitute 40% of your grade.  Assigned texts must be brought to class; readings in The MLA Handbook will be added as the class goes on, and you will find it helpful to bring this book to all classes as soon as you have chosen your research topic.

Each student will present a short oral report (8-10 minutes) on one of the reading assignments during the semester and a longer oral report (15 minutes) at the end of the semester on his or her research topic.  The short oral report on the reading assignment will be accompanied by a one-page handout consisting of questions, quotations from the text, analysis, or critical commentary on the work read. The longer oral report on the research topic will be accompanied by a one- or two-page annotated bibliography. (The bibliography attached to the research paper does not have to be annotated.  The annotations on this handout are for the other students in the class.)

Other written work includes a review (2-4 pages; prompt to be handed out in class) of a scholarly article due early in the semester that can be revised after grading; several ungraded but required assignments related to the research paper; and the paper itself. The ungraded assignments include short descriptions of the proposed topic, a list of questions to be answered or an outline of or bibliography for the proposed paper, and most importantly a formal draft of the research paper.  This draft should be a complete paper with full and complete bibliographical references and annotations; think of this assignment as a final draft that you will have a chance to revise.  (All of these requirements will be discussed fully in class.)  Late rough drafts will result in a lower grade on the final paper; late final drafts will not be accepted.  Keep copies of all written work submitted, including rough drafts.  Turn in a stamped envelope with the final draft of the research paper if you wish it to be returned to you.  All papers are to be double spaced, printed in 12-pt type, with borders of one or one-and-a-quarter inches.  Put your name on (and number the pages of) your papers and handouts. All written work may be turned in early either in class or in the door slot of Calhoun 218.

Students with disabilities may request appropriate academic accommodations from the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities, 471-6259.

For more information, please download the full syllabus.

Publications

For a complete publications listing, please download the full CV.

"Rhetoric, Gender, and the Literary Arts: Classical Speeches in the Schoolroom." New Medieval Literature 11 (2009).

"You May Have Changed My Life." English Language Notes 4 (2009). Special Issue on Experimental Literary Pedagogy.

"A Medieval Rhetorical Manual in the 17th Century: The Case of Christian Daum and the Poetria nova." Classica et Beneventana: Essays Presented to Virginia Brown on the Occasion of Her 65th Birthday. 2008.

''Using the Poetria nova to Teach Dictamen in Italy and Central Europe.'' Papers on Rhetoric V. 2003.

''Weeping for Dido: Epilogue on a Premodern Rhetorical Exercise in the Postmodern Classroom,'' Latin Grammar and Rhetoric: From Classical Theory to Medieval Practice. 2002.

''La retórica en el aula medieval, con algunas aplicationes modernas.'' Lecturas retóricas de la sociedad. Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, 2002.

''Boys Will Be Women: Musings on Classroom Nostalgia and the Chaucerian Audience(s).'' Speaking Images: Essays in Honor of V.A. Kolve. 2001.

''The Teaching of Poetic Composition in the Later Middle Ages.'' A Short History of Writing Instruction: From Ancient Greece to Modern America. 2001.

Awards & Honors

Awards & Honors

(last ten years; for complete list please download CV)

  • Fellowship at the Institute for Advanced Study, 2011-201
  • Phi Beta Kappa Alpha of Texas Award for Distinction in Teaching, 2011
  • 2011 Book Award from the Rhetoric Society of America (for Classroom Commentaries, 2010)
  • Paul W. Mellon Rome Prize in Renaissance and Early Modern Studies, American Academy in Rome, 2007-2008
  • Chad Oliver Teaching Award, Plan II Honors Program, 2007
  • Harry H. Ransom Teaching Award, College of Liberal Arts, 2006
  • University of Texas Special Research Grant, 2004-2005
  • Virginia Brown Fellowship, The Center for Epigraphical and Palaeographical Studies, The Ohio State University, November 2005
  • C. B. Smith, Sr., Nash Phillips, Clyde Copus Centennial Chair Honoring Harry Huntt Ransom Fellowship, University of Texas, 2005-2006
  • Dean’s Fellowship, College of Liberal Arts, Fall 2005
  • President’s Associates’ Teaching Award, University of Texas, 2004

 

bottom border