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Robert G. Moser, Chair BAT 2.116, Mailcode A1800, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-5121

Kenneth Greene

Associate Professor Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley

Kenneth Greene

Contact

  • Phone: 512.232.7206
  • Office: BAT 4.112
  • Office Hours: Please see Gov Dept website
  • Campus Mail Code: A1800

Biography

Kenneth Greene specializes in political parties and elections, Mexican politics, Latin American politics, and research methods. Recently, he was Principal Investigator on the Mexico Clientelism Study that involves survey research and ethnographic interviewing. He was also Senior Project Personnel on the Mexico 2006 Panel Study of voters and Co-Principal Investigator on the Mexico 2006 Candidate and Party Elite Study. His other research interests include voting behavior, social movements, spatial theory, and comparative democratization. He teaches on research methods, Mexican politics, and political parties, and co-directs the Undergraduate Honors Program.

His awards include the 2008 Best Book Award from the Comparative Democratization Section of the American Political Science Association and the 2007 Best Paper Award from the same section, a 2009 Liberal Arts Council Teaching Award and a 2011 Raymond Dickson Teaching Award, both for undergraduate education at UT-Austin, two National Science Foundation research grants, Fulbright Scholar (Mexico), and scholar in residence at the Center for U.S.-Mexican Studies at the University of California San Diego, the Center for Democracy and the Third Sector at Georgetown University, and the Kellogg Institute of International Studies at the University of Notre Dame.

His first book Why Dominant Parties Lose: Mexico’s Democratization in Comparative Perspective (2007) -- now available in paperback -- develops a theory of single-party dominance that accounts for its incredible durability and its ultimate demise in countries on four continents.  He has published work in the American Journal of Political Science, World Politics, Comparative Political Studies, PS: Political Science and Politics, Foreign Affairs en Espanol, Politica y Gobierno, and book chapters in English and Spanish-language edited volumes.

GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

39065 • Spring 2014
Meets MW 300pm-430pm ART 1.102
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Course description.

The United States and Mexico have always enjoyed (or suffered through) a close relationship.  Since the 1980s, this relationship has most clearly played out over the various kinds of cross-border flows, including trade, (im)migration, and drug trafficking.  After an extended introduction to Mexico’s 20th century political and economic development, we will turn to each of these transnational flows, highlighting both the problems and potential benefits to increasing closeness between the two countries.

 

Course requirements:

Students will take two midterm exams and a final exam.  The format of the exams will be determined by the start of the semester, but the most likely is that the midterms will include multiple choice questions and short answers that will require analysis of the material (not simply recall).  The final exam will likely be entirely multiple choice and will definitely be scheduled during finals week.  There are no extra credit assignments.  The final grade for the course will likely be determined as follows:

Midterm 1                                 30%

Midterm 2                                 35%

Final Exam                               35%

 

Readings:

TBD but will include several books and a course packet.

GOV 390L • Political Parties & Party Sys

39515 • Spring 2014
Meets W 930am-1230pm BAT 1.104
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This is an advanced introduction to the study of political parties and party systems for graduate students.  The literature on these subjects is vast and we will not be able to cover all of the important themes.  We will focus on party formation, organization, strategy, and institutionalization as well as representation and party system stability.  The course is focused on theory and will select from the best books and articles, regardless of the empirical cases they study.  As a result, we will hop around the globe from week to week and reading to reading.  Nevertheless, it is important for students to get case-specific material, so I expect that students will read some of the recommended works each week or other supplemental materials on specific country cases that interest them.

 

Grading. Your responsibilities include the following main components. 

  1. Active participation in seminar discussion (20%).
  2. Each week, write a one-page reaction to the readings (10%).  This may be an analytic summary, a critique, or a combination of the two.  E-mail me the summary by Monday at noon.
    1. Option 1 is a concept paper, a data paper, and a book review. 
    2. Book review (10%): Decide on a book and tell me by February 7.  Then, by February 21 (or sooner), hand in a 5-page paper (no longer!) that is modeled on a professional book review like one would find in a leading political science journals. For examples, consult Comparative Political Studies, Comparative Politics, Perspectives on Politics, Political Science Quarterly, among others.  Please choose one of the substantive books from the syllabus, not a technical one and not an edited volume.  You may substitute a book not on the syllabus with permission, but I would prefer that you use one from the course.
    3. Concept paper (30%): Decide on a concept and hand in a one-page prospectus by March 7.  Then, by April 4, hand in a 8-10-page paper that analyzes a particular concept in the parties literature, including how it is used and measured by key authors, any problems with conceptualization and measurement, and ways that the concept could be improved.  Some possibilities include party system institutionalization, social/political cleavage, ideology, and clientelism.  For a good example, see Steven Levitsky “Levitsky, S.  1998.  Institutionalization and Peronism: The Case, the Concept, and the Case for Unpacking the Concept” Party Politics 4(1):77-92 available at http://scholar.harvard.edu/levitsky/publications?sort=title&order=asc.
    4. Data paper (30%): Decide on a topic and e-mail me a one-page prospectus by April 13.  Then, by May 9 hand in a 8-10-page paper that tests a hypothesis found in the parties literature using qualitative or quantitative data.  You might take a hypothesis that has been tested before and test it on a broader or different set of cases (i.e., a hypothesis that has been tested on Latin American cases that you instead test on Asian cases), a hypothesis with a dubious test that you want to replicate, or a hypothesis that has not been tested adequately or at all.
    5. Option 2 is a book review (10%) (see above) and a 20-25-page research paper centered on an important issue in the parties literature (60%).  For the research paper, hand in a 2-3-page prospectus by March 7 that includes a statement of the question to be answered, why we should care about having an answer to this question, some plausible explanations, a research plan, and a preliminary bibliography of at least the main sources. I may ask you to re-write this prospectus as we fine-tune your topic.  The final research paper is due May 9 and should include an explicit treatment of some aspect of party theory and the use of primary data. These data may be qualitative or quantitative. The paper may be broadly comparative or it may be grounded in a particular region or country.  This option may be better suited to advanced students working on their dissertations or those who already have an idea for a conference paper or article manuscript that could be submitted to a journal.

 

Readings: TBD

GOV 337M • Politics Of Mexico

39173 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm MEZ B0.306
(also listed as LAS 337M )
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Prerequisites

No pre-reqs but a good attitude strongly preferred.

 

Course Description

This course analyzes Mexico’s 20th century political and economic development, with a peek at early 21st century dynamics. Why did Mexico experience both political stability and economic growth until the 1970s while other Latin American countries endured brutal military regimes? What accounts for Mexico’s severe economic crises of 1982 and 1994? Why did the PRI lose in 2000 after 71 years in power? How “democratic” is Mexico’s new democracy? The first portion of the course examines Mexico’s post-Revolutionary politics, the characteristics of the national political regime during the classic period of stability with economic growth, and the tumultuous political and economic environment from the 1970s to the end of the century. This material will bepresented chronologically, but rather than a descriptive history, we will focus on explaining political and economic outcomes. Subsequently, we will examine key themes in Mexico’s new fully competitive democracy.

 

Grading Policy

You have two grading options for this course. Option 1 consists of three exams (two in-class midterms and one take-home final essay).  Option 2 consists of two in-class midterm exams and one research paper.  
 
Research Paper for Option 2.  This will be an independent and largely self-directed 10-page research paper focused on a particular event in contemporary Mexican politics (i.e., after 1911). As a political science paper it should seek to explain why the event occurred. In doing this, it should focus on the actors involved, their competing interests, and their various resources. The paper should include, but be more than, a simple description of the event. As a research paper, it should involve research in the library and perhaps on the internet, but in all cases must make use of scholarly books and journal articles beyond those assigned on the syllabus. Completing the research paper will require more work than taking the final exam, but it should be more rewarding. Following the rules of citation and attribution is mandatory and plagiarism will earn a failing grade in the course and referral to the University for disciplinary action. Please review the university’s plagiarism guidelines at http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs/scholdis_plagiarism.php.
 
Students who plan to write a research paper must submit a one-page statement of research intent by October 26.  The statement should include a clear summary of the event to be covered, the actors involved, and their goals. It should also include at least three citations of sources you have already read for your research. Researching and writing this one-pager will take real work, so budget about a week. If the research topic is determined to be infeasible, students will have one week to hand in a revised statement for which the same rules apply. Students who pursue this option should plan on meeting with me to discuss the topic and progress. Students that do not hand in the statement by October 26 or whose proposal is not accepted after two rounds will follow Option 1.
 
This course will use +/- grading and will not be curved. The final grade for the course will be determined as follows:


Option 1:


Midterm 1                    30%                

Midterm 2                    30%                

“Final” Essay                35%                

Participation                  5%                

Option 2:

Midterm 1                    30%


Midterm 2                    30%


Research paper        35%


Participation                 5%
 

Participation: 5% of your final grade will be based on participation. Although the course is structured as a lecture, I try to involve students each day and the small class size will give many opportunities for you to participate.

 

Texts

Required Readings:
Ø  Kenneth F Greene, Why Dominant Parties Lose: Mexico’s Democratization in Comparative Perspective (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2009), available for purchase at theCoop. In the highly unlikely case that I am issued any profits from sales of the book at UT, I will donate 100% of them to the UT undergraduate scholarship fund.
Ø  A Two-volume course packet that is available for purchase at XXX

GOV 339L • Research Methods In Government

39175 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm ART 1.110
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Prerequisites

No pre-reqs but a good attitude strongly preferred.

 

Course Description

This course provides an introduction to the methods used in political science research. After learning about the structure of causal analysis, wewill examine four research strategies: experiments, “large N” or quantitative studies (AKA statistics), “small N” studies that use qualitative reasoning, and formal modeling. The goal of the course is to provide students with the analytic tools to critically evaluate social science research and causal arguments found in everyday life and to improve students’ ability to pose and answer research questions on their own.

 

Grading Policy

The course grade will be based on one in-class midterm, a comprehensive final examination given during the exam period, several homework assignments (see below), and in-class participation.  We will use plus/minus grading for the final grade.  The final grade will be determined as follows:


Midterm- 30%


Final Exam- 35%


Homework- 30%


Participation- 5%
 


Homework assignments: There will be five graded homework assignments, handed out in lecture without prior notice and will be due one week later.
 
Exam and Homework Policies: Early final exams will not be given.  Medical or family emergency and religious holidays that are not on UT’s calendar are the only reasons that a homework assignment or the midterm can be postponed.  It is my strong preference that you notify me ahead of time (a must for religious holidays), unless you are unconscious.  All assignments must be completed before graded assignments are returned to the class (typically within one week).  After that, a make-up will not bepossible.  There is no provision for a make-up final exam. During exams, the following are not allowed: calculators that can calculate statistics (even if you do not know how to use these functions), cell phones, computers, and other communication devices.  Cheating earns an F in the course and referral to the Dean of Students with my recommendation for expulsion from the university.  For more information on scholastic dishonesty, see http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs.
 
Participation: The class is lecture-style but I ask for as muchstudent participation as I can – within the limits imposed by class size.  As a result, I take note of participation and include it in the final grade.  Participating is key, voicing the correct answer is not (but no need to yell out random things either).
 

 

Texts

All readings are in a two-volume course packet that is available for purchase TBA

GOV 337M • Politics Of Mexico

38707 • Fall 2011
Meets MW 500pm-630pm MEZ B0.306
(also listed as LAS 337M )
show description

see syllabus

GOV 339L • Research Methods In Government

38710 • Fall 2011
Meets MW 330pm-500pm WAG 214
show description

see syllabus

GOV 337M • Politics Of Mexico

38915 • Spring 2011
Meets MW 500pm-630pm PAR 201
(also listed as LAS 337M )
show description

Gov 337M / LAS 337M The Politics of MexicoThis course analyzes Mexico's 20th century political and economicdevelopment. Why did Mexico experience both political stability andeconomic growth until the 1970s while other Latin American countriesendured brutal military regimes? What accounts for Mexico's severeeconomic crises of 1982 and 1994? Why did the PRI lose in 2000 after 71years in power? What are the prospects for Mexico's new democracy? Thefirst portion of the course examines Mexico's post-Revolutionarypolitics, the characteristics of the national political regime duringthe classic period of stability with economic growth, and tumultuouspolitical and economic environment from the 1970s to the end of thecentury. This material will be presented chronologically, but ratherthan a descriptive history, we will focus on explaining political andeconomic outcomes. Subsequently, we will examine key themes in Mexico'snew fully-competitive democracy.You have two grading options for this course. Option 1 consists of threeexams (two in-class midterms and one take-home final essay due May 12).Option 2 consists of two in-class midterm exams and one research paperdue May 12.  Weekly write-ups or participation in scheduled discussionsections (see "Participation" below) are required regardless of whichoption is chosen.Research Paper for Option 2.  This will be an independent and largelyself-directed 10-page research paper focused on a particular event in20th century Mexican politics. As a political science paper it shouldseek to explain why the event occurred. In doing this, it should focuson the actors involved, their competing interests, and their variousresources. The paper should include, but be more than, a simpledescription of the event. As a research paper, it should involveresearch in the library and perhaps on the internet, but in all casesmust make use of scholarly books and journal articles beyond thoseassigned on the syllabus. Following the rules of citation andattribution is mandatory and plagiarism will earn a failing grade in thecourse and referral to the university for disciplinary action. Pleasereview the university's plagiarism guidelines athttp://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs/scholdis_plagiarism.php.Students who plan to write a research paper must submit a one-pagestatement of research intent by March 30.  The statement should includea clear summary of the event to be covered, the actors involved, andtheir goals. It should also include at least three citations of sourcesyou have already read for your research. If the research topic isdetermined to be infeasible, students will have one week to hand in arevised statement for which the same rules apply. Students who pursuethis option should plan on meeting with me to discuss the topic andprogress. Students that do not hand in the statement by March 30 orwhose proposal is not accepted after two rounds will follow Option 1(the three exam option).This course will use +/- grading and will not be curved. The final gradefor the course will be determined as follows:Option 1:                         Option 2:            Midterm 1            30%        Midterm 130%Midterm 2            30%        Midterm 230%"Final" Essay        30%        Research Paper    30%Participation        10%        Participation         10%Participation: 10% of your final grade will be based on participation.You have two options to earn participation points, and you may mix andmatch, though you can only earn one point per week.Participation Option A - Weekly write-ups: Submit a one-page digest ofthe week's readings, due by the end of lecture each Thursday, with nolate assignments and no e-mail assignments accepted. You will earn onepoint each week for a write-up and only one is allowed per week. You canearn a maximum of 10 points, meaning that although you are encouraged tocomplete more than 10 weekly write-ups, you need only complete 10 forfull credit.  The write-ups should be brief synopses of the theme/issuesdealt with in the required course readings, not a summary of eachindividual reading and not a commentary based on lecture only. Try tobring the ideas together. Partial credit may be given so you will haveto put some thought into this; however, it should not require more than30 minutes of work after you complete the readings. Completing theseassignments will do wonders for reading comprehension and exampreparation. As such, I do not view this as a busy-work assignment, butas a crucial element of the course.Participation Option B - Weekly discussion participation: Instead of thewrite-ups, you may actively (i.e., with your voice) participate inEnglish-language or Spanish-language discussion sections run by TomPerkowski at the times and locations noted at the top of the syllabus.These will be free-ranging discussions of the readings and lecturematerial. You will be able to ask questions and will be encouraged toprovide your own answers, discuss the week's themes, and grapple withthe material. The point is to critically engage the material, so nocredit will be given just for showing up. In my view, the coursematerial is best learned through critical engagement, so I am a big fanof discussion sections.

GOV 390L • Comparative Party Systems

39215 • Spring 2011
Meets M 700pm-1000pm BAT 5.102
show description

see syllabus

GOV 339L • Research Methods In Government

38540 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm WAG 214
show description

Course Description: This course provides an introduction to the methods used in political science research.  After learning about the structure of causal analysis, we will examine four basic research strategies: experiments, “large N” or quantitative studies (AKA statistics), “small N” studies that use qualitative reasoning, and formal modeling.  The goals of the course include providing students with the analytic tools to critically evaluate social science research and causal arguments found in everyday life and improving students’ ability to pose and answer research questions on their own.
 
The course grade will be based on one in-class midterm, a comprehensive final examination given during the exam period, several homework assignments (see below), and participation.  We will use plus/minus grading for the final grade.  The final grade will be determined as follows:
 
Grading Policy:
Midterm    30%
Final Exam   35%
Homework   30%
Participation     5%

Texts: TBD

GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

38755 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm WEL 1.308
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Government 312L satisfies the second half of the mandated six hours of government that every UT student must take.  Course covers analysis of varying topics concerned with American political institutions and policies, including the United States Constitution, and assumes basic knowledge of government from GOV 310L, which is a prerequiste. May be taken for credit only once.

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