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Robert G. Moser, Chair BAT 2.116, Mailcode A1800, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-5121

Scott Wolford

Assistant Professor Ph.D., Emory University

Scott Wolford

Contact

Biography

Scott Wolford (Ph.D., Emory University, 2008 and B.A., Transylvania University, 2002) has published articles in the American Journal of Political Science, the Journal of Politics, International Studies Quarterly, the Journal of Theoretical Politics, and the Journal of Conflict Resolution. His work focuses on the role of leadership change in international conflict, foreign policy coalitions and multilateralism, and international institutions.

Interests

International Conflict, International Institutions, Game Theory

GOV 344 • American Foreign Relations

38840 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 930am-1100am GAR 0.102
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GOV 344 American Foreign Relations (38840)

 

Prerequisites:

None

 

Course description:

This course examines the theory and practice of American foreign policy, with a particular focus on the post-1945 era. We focus on systematic, scientific explanations for the why and the how of decisions over war and peace, alliances, trade, and foreign aid, and we will discuss both the international and domestic sources of these policies. The goal is to build a useful, practical base of knowledge for understanding both ongoing and future issues in American foreign relations.

 

Grading Policy:

Students will be graded on three exams (85%) and a combination of quizzes and short writing assignments (15%)

 

Texts:

Ray, James Lee. 2013. American Foreign Policy and Political Ambition, 2nd Ed. Washington, DC: CQ Press.

GOV 355M • World War I In Real Time

38870 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm MEZ 1.216
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Grading criteria: students will be graded on three exams, occasional quizzes and impromptu writing assignments, as well as a brief analysis paper.

 

Description: This course follows events in the opening months of the First World War---which broke out in August 1914---exactly one hundred years after the outbreak of war. Each day, we will follow events as they happened a century before, beginning with the causes of the war in the July Crisis of 1914, the mobilization of the European great powers, and the initial campaigns on the Western Front that would introduce the world to the horrors of industrial war. We will engage modern, cutting edge theories and evidence about the origins and conduct of war to shed new light on why "the seminal tragedy of modern times" occurred when it did, and on what we can learn from it in the present.

 

Books

- Fromkin, David. 2005. Europe's Last Summer. Vintage.

- Herwig, Holger G. 2009. The Marine, 1914. Vintage.

- Philpott, William. 2014. War of Attrition. Overlook.

GOV S360N • Causes Of War

84893 • Summer 2014
Meets MTWTHF 1130am-100pm MEZ B0.306
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GOV 360N, Topic 2: The Causes of War   Prerequisites: Upper-division standing and 6 semester hours of lower-division coursework in government   Course description: This course explores cutting-edge research on the political origins of war, adopting a scientific approach to argumentation and evidence.   Grading policy: Students will be graded on three exams (60%), short writing assignments (25%), and occasional quizzes (15%).   Texts: John Keegan. 2005. The Iraq War. Vintage Books. Fromkin, David. 2004. Europe's Last Summer. Vintage Books.

GOV 360N • Causes Of War

39275 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 800am-930am MEZ B0.306
(also listed as REE 335 )
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Prerequisites:

Upper-division standing and 6 semester hours of lower-division coursework in government

Course description:

This course explores cutting-edge research on the political origins of war, adopting a scientific approach to argumentation and evidence.

Grading policy:

Students will be graded on three exams (60%), short writing assignments (25%), and occasional quizzes (15%).

Texts:

John Keegan. 2005. The Iraq War. Vintage Books.

Fromkin, David. 2004. Europe's Last Summer. Vintage Books.

GOV 385N • Intro To Formal Pol Analysis

39480 • Spring 2014
Meets W 930am-1230pm BAT 5.102
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Prerequisites:

Graduate standing in government

Course description:

This course will help students develop the tools necessary to consume formal theory in academic work and to write their own formal theories. Heavy emphasis will be placed on logic and the construction of valid arguments.

Grading policy:

Students will be graded on semi-weekly homework (30%), two exams (50%), and a final paper in which students identify a research question and specify, but need not solve, a game capable of answering it (20%).

Texts:

Osborne, Martin J. 2004. An Introduction to Game Theory. Oxford University Press.

Thomson, William. 2011. A Guide for the Young Economist. MIT Press.

GOV 365L • War/Peace: China/Japan/Taiwan

39259 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 800am-930am MEZ B0.306
(also listed as ANS 361 )
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WAR AND PEACE IN EAST ASIA: CHINA, JAPAN, TAIWAN

 

Prerequisites

Upper-division standing and 6 semester hours of lower-division coursework in government or Asian studies

 

Course description

This course uses cutting-edge political science research on the causes of war and peace to analyze recent, current, and future security issues in East Asia, with a particular focus on how events like World War II, the Korean War, and unipolarity shape current and potential military powers such as China, Japan, and Taiwan.

 

Grading policy

Students will be graded on three exams (60%), short writing assignments (25%), and a number of in-class quizzes (15%).

 

Texts

Keohane, Robert. 1984. After Hegemony Princeton University Press Stueck, William. 2004. Rethinking the Korean War Princeton University Press Paine, S.C.M. 2012. The Wars for Asia 1911-1949 Cambridge University Press

GOV 388L • International Security

39403 • Fall 2013
Meets W 1230pm-330pm BAT 5.102
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Prerequisites

 Graduate standing in government

 

Course description

Explores both the role and the causes of war in the international system, including its initiation, prosecution, and termination, as well as the effects of international institutions, system structure, and domestic politics on the conflict process.

 

Grading policy

Students will be graded on class participation (15%), two papers dedicated to summarizing and critiquing the week's readings (35%), and a final research paper (50%).

 

Texts

Powell, Robert. 1999. In the Shadow of Power Princeton University Press

Kydd, Andrew. 2005.Trust and Mistrust in International Relations Princeton University Press

Wagner, R. Harrison. 2007. War and the State University of Michigan Press

Chiozza, Giacomo, and Hein Goemans. 2011. Leaders and International Conflict Cambridge University Press

Braumoeller, Bear F. 2013. The Great Powers and the International System Cambridge University Press

 

GOV 360N • Causes Of War

38923 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm MEZ B0.306
show description

Prerequisites

Upper-division standing and 6 semester hours of lower-divsion coursework in government  

 

Course Description

This course explores cutting-edge research on the political origins of war, adopting a scientific approach to argumentation and evidence.  

 

Grading Policy

Students will be graded on three exams (60%), short writing assignments (25%), and a small independent research project (15%).  

 

Texts

John Keegan. 2005. The Iraq War Vintage Books. Gen.

Wesley Clark. 2001. Waging Modern War PublicAffairs Press.

GOV 385N • Intro To Formal Pol Analysis

39110 • Spring 2013
Meets W 930am-1230pm BAT 5.102
show description

Prerequisites:

Graduate standing in government  

 

Course description:

This course will help students develop the tools necessary to consume formal theory in academic work and to write their own formal theories. Heavy emphasis will be placed on logic and the construction of valid arguments.  

 

Grading policy:

Students will be graded on semi-weekly homework (30%), two exams (50%), and a final paper in which students identify a research question and specify, but need not solve, a game capable of answering it (20%).  

 

Texts:

Osborne, Martin J. 2004. An Introduction to Game Theory Oxford University Press.

GOV 388L • International Security

38975 • Spring 2012
Meets TH 930am-1230pm BAT 1.104
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Explores both the role and the causes of war in the international system, including its initiation, prosecution, and termination, as well as the effects of international institutions, system structure, and domestic politics on the conflict process.

 

Professor: Scott Wolford

GOV 344 • American Foreign Relations

38722 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 900am-1000am MEZ B0.306
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See syllabus

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