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Robert G. Moser, Chair BAT 2.116, Mailcode A1800, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-5121

Raul L. Madrid

Professor Ph.D., Stanford University

Raul L. Madrid

Contact

Biography

Raúl L. Madrid is Associate Professor in the Department of Government at the University of Texas at Austin. He specializes in Latin American politics, comparative ethnic politics, and comparative social policy. He has recently begun a new research project on the determinants of democratic consolidation in Latin America. He received his B.A. from Yale University and his M.A. and Ph.D. from Stanford University. Before entering graduate school, he served as a Peace Corps volunteer in Costa Rica and as a foreign affairs analyst for a not-for-profit research organization in Washington, DC.

He is the author of The Rise of Ethnic Politics in Latin America (Cambridge University Press 2012) and Retiring the State: The Politics of Pension Privatization in Latin America and Beyond (Stanford, 2003) and is a co-editor of Leftist Governments in Latin America: Successes and Shortcomings (Cambridge, 2010). His articles have appeared in Comparative Politics, Electoral Studies, Journal of Latin American Studies, Latin American Politics and Society, Latin American Research Review, Political Science Quarterly, and World Politics, among other journals. He has received research grants and fellowships from the National Science Foundation and the Institute for the Study of World Politics as well as from Stanford University and the University of Texas at Austin.

The courses he teaches include: U.S. - Latin American Relations; Introduction to Latin American Government; Politics of Development in Latin America; Comparative Ethnic Politics; and Theoretical Perspectives on Latin American Politics.

GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

38765 • Fall 2014
Meets MW 300pm-430pm WEL 3.502
show description

Prerequisites

 

None

 

Course Description

 

This course will analyze the origins and consequences of U.S. policies toward Latin America. The first third of the course provides some basic background on U.S.-Latin American relations. We will identify the main actors in U.S. policymaking in the region, discuss different theories that seek to explain U.S.-Latin American relations, and examine the history of U.S.-Latin American relations from the colonial period to World War II. The second part of the course will deal with U.S.-Latin American relations during the Cold War, from 1945 to 1990. The topics examined here will include the Cuban missile crisis and the Bay of Pigs, U.S. support for South American military regimes, and U.S. policy toward guerrilla movements in Central America. The final section of the course will examine current issues in U.S.-Latin American relations, including trade, immigration, narcotics and the promotion of human rights and democracy.

 

This course carries the ethics and leadership flag and, as a result, at least one-third of the course will be devoted to practical ethics. In the exams and the paper, students will be asked to defend and critique U.S. policies in the region from an ethical perspective. The course will emphasize the difficulty of ethical policymaking in a complex world of competing goals and interests. Students will be encouraged to examine policy choices from a variety of viewpoints, weighing the perspectives of U.S. policymakers as well as Latin American leaders and citizens.

 

Grading:

 

2 in-class examinations with multiple choice and essay questions (30% each)

1 in-class examination with multiple choice questions only (20%)

1 5-6 page policy research paper (20%)

 

Texts:

 

Danner, Mark. The Massacre at El Mozote. New York: Vintage Books, 1994.

 

Kennedy, Robert. Thirteen Days: A Memoir of the Cuban Missile Crisis. New York: W. W. Norton and Co. 1999.

 

Weeks, Gregory. U.S. and Latin American Relations. New York: Pearson/Longman, 2008.

GOV 328L • Intro To Lat Amer Gov & Pol

39107 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm MEZ B0.306
(also listed as LAS 337M )
show description

Course Description:

 

This course will provide a broad introduction to the changing politics of the region.  We will explore the causes and consequences of the political and economic changes that have swept Latin America during the last century. The course will examine why Latin American countries have shifted from free market policies to widespread state intervention and then back again. It will analyze the cycles of democratic and authoritarian rule in the region and their implications for the welfare of Latin American citizens. And it will discuss some of the most important contemporary economic, social and political challenges facing countries of the region.  The course will focus on trends affecting Latin America as a whole, but some lectures and readings will examine how these trends played out in specific countries of the region.

 

Prerequisites:

 

6 semester hours of lower-division coursework in government

 

Grading:

 

1st examination: 30%

2nd examination: 30%

3rd examination: 15%

Short (5-6 page) research paper: 15%

Pop quizzes: 10%

 

Texts:

 

Hillman, Richard S. and Thomas D’Agostino, ed. Understanding Contemporary Latin America. Boulder, CO: Lynne Rienner Publishers, 2011.  4th Edition.

 

Smith, Peter H. Democracy in Latin America. New York: Oxford University Press, 2012. 2nd Edition.

 

Winn, Peter. Americas: The Changing Face of Latin America and the Caribbean. Berkeley, CA: Univ. of California Press, 2006. 3rd Edition.

 

A course packet of additional readings

 

Flag: Global cultures.

GOV 390L • Democratic Consolidation

39510 • Spring 2014
Meets T 900am-1200pm BAT 5.102
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Course Description:

This course explores the causes of democratization and democratic consolidation or lack thereof. The aims of the course are three-fold: 1) To acquaint students with the theoretical literatures on these subjects; 2) To teach students how to design and evaluate theoretically-oriented research; and 3) To train students to carry out various types of writing assignments that political scientists are frequently required to perform. The first two weeks of the course provide an overview of the field and the methods used in it. Subsequent weeks focus in depth on different factors that have been argued to play a key role in fostering or undermining democracy. These include economic development, elites, the working classes, inequality, natural resources, civil society, religious and ethnic cleavages, political culture, institutional factors, and international diffusion

 

Prerequisites

None

 

Grading

Students will be graded based on class participation (10%); an article review (10%); a conceptual paper (15%); a book review (15%); a review essay (20%); and a final exam (30%).

 

Texts

 

Coppedge, Michael. Democratization and Research Methods. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2012

 

Dunning, Thad. 2008. Crude Democracy: Natural Resource Wealth and Political Regimes. New York: Cambridge University Press.

 

A course packet of readings will also be assigned.

GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

39110 • Fall 2013
Meets MW 300pm-430pm MEZ 1.306
show description

Prerequisites

None

 

Course Description

This course will analyze the origins and consequences of U.S. policies toward Latin America. The first third of the course provides some basic background on U.S.-Latin American relations. We will identify the main actors in U.S. policymaking in the region, discuss different theories that seek to explain U.S.-Latin American relations, and examine the history of U.S.-Latin American relations from the colonial period to World War II. The second part of the course will deal with U.S.-Latin American relations during the Cold War, from 1945 to 1990. The topics examined here will include the Cuban missile crisis and the Bay of Pigs, U.S. support for South American military regimes, and U.S. policy toward guerrilla movements in Central America. The final section of the course will examine current issues in U.S.-Latin American relations, including trade, immigration, narcotics and the promotion of human rights and democracy.

 

Grading Policy

2 in-class examinations with multiple choice and essay questions (30% each)

1 in-class examination with multiple choice questions only (20%)

1 5-6 page policy research paper (20%)

 

Texts

Danner, Mark. The Massacre at El Mozote. New York: Vintage Books, 1994.

Kennedy, Robert. Thirteen Days: A Memoir of the Cuban Missile Crisis. New York: W. W. Norton and Co. 1999. 

Weeks, Gregory. U.S. and Latin American Relations. New York: Pearson/Longman, 2008.

Course packet

GOV 328L • Intro To Lat Amer Gov & Polit

38775 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm WEL 2.304
(also listed as LAS 337M, URB 350 )
show description

Prerequisites:

6 semester hours of lower-division coursework in government

 

Course Description:

This course will provide a broad introduction to the changing politics of the region.  We will explore the causes and consequences of the political and economic changes that have swept Latin America during the last century. The course will examine why Latin American countries have shifted from free market policies to widespread state intervention and then back again. It will analyze the cycles of democratic and authoritarian rule in the region and their implications for the welfare of Latin American citizens. And it will discuss some of the most important contemporary economic, social and political challenges facing countries of the region.  The course will focus on trends affecting Latin America as a whole, but some lectures and readings will examine how these trends played out in specific countries of the region.

 

Grading Policy:

1st examination: 30%

2nd examination: 30%

3rd examination: 15%

Short (5-6 page) research paper: 15%

Pop quizzes: 10%

 

Texts:

Hillman, Richard S. and Thomas D’Agostino, ed. Understanding Contemporary Latin America. Boulder, CO: Lynne Rienner Publishers, 2011.  4th Edition.

Smith, Peter H. Democracy in Latin America. New York: Oxford University Press, 2012. 2nd Edition.

Winn, Peter. Americas: The Changing Face of Latin America and the Caribbean. Berkeley, CA: Univ. of California Press, 2006. 3rd Edition.

A course packet of additional readings

GOV 390L • Democratic Consolidation

39135 • Spring 2013
Meets T 330pm-630pm BAT 5.102
show description

Prerequisites 

None

 

Course Description:

This course will explore the theoretical literatures on democratization and democratic consolidation. It will first examine debates over the definition and measurement of democracy and democratic consolidation and it will evaluate the various research methods used in this field. It will then analyze important theories that have sought to explain the emergence of democracy, including studies that have emphasized economic development, class constellations and inequality, social cleavages, institutional factors, and international diffusion. Finally, it will explore the growing literature on the determinants of democratic stability and deepening.

 

Grading Policy

Students will be graded based on class participation (15%); an article review (15%); a conceptual paper (20%); a review essay (20%); and a research proposal (30%).

 

Texts 

Coppedge, Michael. Democratization and Research Methods. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2012

Teorell, Jan. Determinants of Democratization: Explaining Regime Change in the World, 1972-2006. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2010.

A course packet of readings will also be assigned.

GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

38645 • Fall 2012
Meets MW 300pm-430pm MEZ 1.306
show description

Prerequisites

None 

 

Course Description

This course will analyze the origins and consequences of U.S. policies toward Latin America. The first third of the course provides some basic background on U.S.-Latin American relations. We will identify the main actors in U.S. policymaking in the region, discuss different theories that seek to explain U.S.-Latin American relations, and examine the history of U.S.-Latin American relations from the colonial period to World War II. The second part of the course will deal with U.S.-Latin American relations during the Cold War, from 1945 to 1990. The topics examined here will include the Cuban missile crisis and the Bay of Pigs, U.S. support for South American military regimes, and U.S. policy toward guerrilla movements in Central America. The final section of the course will examine current issues in U.S.-Latin American relations, including trade, immigration, narcotics and the promotion of human rights and democracy.

 

Grading Policy

2 in-class examinations with multiple choice and essay questions (30% each)

1 in-class examination with multiple choice questions only (20%)

1 5-6 page policy research paper (20%)

 

Texts:

Danner, Mark. The Massacre at El Mozote. New York: Vintage Books, 1994.

Kennedy, Robert. Thirteen Days: A Memoir of the Cuban Missile Crisis. New York: W. W. Norton and Co. 1999.

Weeks, Gregory. U.S. and Latin American Relations. New York: Pearson/Longman, 2008.

Course packet

GOV 328L • Intro To Lat Amer Gov & Polit

38620 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm MEZ B0.306
(also listed as LAS 337M, URB 350 )
show description

Course Description:

This course will provide a broad introduction to the changing politics of the region.  We will explore the causes and consequences of the political and economic changes that have swept Latin America during the last century. The course will examine why Latin American countries have shifted from free market policies to widespread state intervention and then back again. It will analyze the cycles of democratic and authoritarian rule in the region and their implications for the welfare of Latin American citizens. And it will discuss some of the most important contemporary economic, social and political challenges facing countries of the region.  The course will focus on trends affecting Latin America as a whole, but some lectures and readings will examine how these trends played out in specific countries of the region.

Prerequisites:

6 semester hours of lower-division coursework in government

Grading:

1st examination: 30%

2nd examination: 30%

3rd examination: 15%

Short (5-6 page) research paper: 15%

Pop quizzes: 10%

Texts:

Hillman, Richard S. and Thomas D’Agostino, ed. Understanding Contemporary Latin America. Boulder, CO: Lynne Rienner Publishers, 2011.  4th Edition.

Smith, Peter H. Democracy in Latin America. New York: Oxford University Press, 2012. 2nd Edition.

Winn, Peter. Americas: The Changing Face of Latin America and the Caribbean. Berkeley, CA: Univ. of California Press, 2006. 3rd Edition.

A course packet of additional readings

GOV 337M • Polit Of Devel In Latin Amer

38678 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm CBA 4.348
(also listed as LAS 337M )
show description

This writing component course will examine the struggle for development in Latin America.  In the first part of the course, we will examine critically some of the major theories of development.  We will then analyze some theories that aim at explaining why Latin America has not developed as rapidly as some other parts of the world. In the final section of the course, we will examine some of the major development challenges that Latin America faces.

GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

38645 • Fall 2011
Meets MW 330pm-500pm WEL 2.246
show description

See syllabus

GOV 328L • Intro To Lat Amer Gov & Polit

38860 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm MEZ B0.306
(also listed as LAS 337M, URB 350 )
show description

This course will provide a broad introduction to the changing politics of the region.  We will explore the causes and consequences of the political and economic changes that have swept Latin America during the last century. We will examine why Latin American countries have shifted from free market policies to widespread state intervention and then back again. We will analyze the cycles of democratic and authoritarian rule in the region and their implications for the welfare of Latin American citizens. And we will discuss of the most important contemporary economic, social and political challenges facing countries of the region.  The course will focus on trends affecting Latin America as a whole, but some lectures and readings will examine how these trends played out in individual countries in the region.

GOV 337M • Polit Of Devel In Latin Amer

38905 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm BAT 5.102
(also listed as LAS 337M )
show description

This writing component course will examine the struggle for development in Latin America during the last century. In the first part of the course, we will examine critically some of the major theories of development. We will then assess how well these, and other, theories explain economic and political outcomes in Latin America. In the final section of the course, we will examine some of the major development challenges that Latin America currently faces.

GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

38470-38480 • Fall 2010
Meets MW 200pm-300pm MEZ B0.306
show description

Course Description:

This course will analyze the origins and consequences of U.S. policies toward Latin America. The first third of the course provides some basic background on U.S.-Latin American relations. We will identify the main actors in U.S. policymaking in the region, discuss different theories that seek to explain U.S.-Latin American relations, and examine the history of U.S.-Latin American relations from the colonial period to World War II. The second part of the course will deal with U.S.-Latin American relations during the Cold War, from 1945 to 1990. The topics examined here will include the Cuban missile crisis and the Bay of Pigs, U.S. support for South American military regimes, and U.S. policy toward guerrilla movements in Central America. The final section of the course will examine current issues in U.S.-Latin American relations, including trade, immigration, narcotics and the promotion of human rights and democracy.

Grading Policy:

2 in-class examinations with multiple choice and essay questions (30% each)
1 in-class examination with multiple choice questions only (15%)
1 5-6 page policy research paper (15%)
Participation in discussion sections (10%)

Textbooks:

Danner, Mark. The Massacre at El Mozote. New York: Vintage Books, 1994.

Kennedy, Robert. Thirteen Days: A Memoir of the Cuban Missile Crisis. New York: W. W. Norton and Co. 1999.

Weeks, Gregory. U.S. and Latin American Relations. New York: Pearson/Longman, 2008.

Course packet

GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

39090-39105 • Fall 2009
Meets MW 200pm-300pm MEZ 1.306
show description

Government 312L satisfies the second half of the mandated six hours of government that every UT student must take.  Course covers analysis of varying topics concerned with American political institutions and policies, including the United States Constitution, and assumes basic knowledge of government from GOV 310L, which is a prerequiste. May be taken for credit only once.

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