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Robert G. Moser, Chair BAT 2.116, Mailcode A1800, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-5121

Mark Verbitsky

BA, University of Alberta; MA, University of Alberta

Mark Verbitsky

Contact

Biography

I am currently finishing my dissertation on Aristolelian political psychology. I focus primarily on Aristotle's Rhetoric and his understanding of human reasoning, and I apply Aristotle's thought with contemporary theories of political psychology.

I am originally from Alberta, Canada. I have a B.A. in psychology and I worked for a year in a mental hospital as a research assistant. After finishing my MA thesis on Nietzsche's moral psychology, I moved to Munich, Germany for a year before coming to Austin.

Interests

Rhetoric, political psychology, development of liberal natural rights doctrines, constitutional law

GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

38700 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 900am-1000am PAR 1
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Course Description

This course will examine the development of American constitutional principles. We will begin with a theoretical focus, studying the foundational texts and debates regarding the form of government that can best secure liberty and equality. In the second part of the course, we will consider historical developments as Americans confronted particular constitutional challenges. Specifically, we will address slavery and its legacies (civil war, segregation, de-segregation), the Progressive movement, and America’s evolving conception of individuality (focusing on free speech).    

 

Grading

1. A midterm and final exam (consisting of short- and long-answer questions)

2. Periodic quizzes

3. An optional paper 

**Strict attendance policy**  

 

Texts

1. John Locke, Second Treatise of Government

2. Alexis de Tocqueville, Democracy in America, vol 2.

3. Online Course Reader (featuring assigned speeches, essays, and Supreme Court cases)

 

 

GOV 312L • Issues & Policies In Amer Gov

38545 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm PAR 1
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The instructor for this course will be Mark Verbitsky.

Course Description: This course will examine the development of American constitutional principles. We will begin with a theoretical focus, studying the foundational texts and debates regarding the form of government that could best secure liberty and equality. In the second part of the course, we will consider historical developments as Americans confronted particular constitutional challenges. Specifically, we will address slavery and its legacy, post-civil war reconstruction, the progressive movement, and the civil rights movement.

Texts: 1. John Locke, Second Treatise of Government, 2. The Federalist Papers, 3. Alexis de Tocqueville, Democracy in America, 4. Course Reader (featuring assigned speeches, essays, and Supreme Court cases).

Grading: A midterm and final exam (consisting of short and long answer questions), periodic quizzes, and an optional paper. Strict attendance policy.

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