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Alan Tully, Chair 128 Inner Campus Dr., Stop B7000, GAR 1.104 Austin, TX 78712-1739 • 512-471-3261

Antony G. Hopkins

Professor Emeritus Ph.D., 1964, University of London

Professor; Walter Prescott Webb Chair of History
Antony G. Hopkins

Biography

Research interests

Professor Hopkins's main interests lie in the history of the non- Western world and the history of European imperialism. His current work on the history of globalization is represented by two edited volumes, Globalization in World History (2002) and Global History: Interactions between the Universal and the Local (2006).

Courses taught

History of imperialism and globalization.

Awards/Honors

Hon. D.Univ. (Stirling), Fellow of the British Academy

HIS 350L • Imperialism: Empir To Globaliz

39537 • Spring 2013
Meets TH 300pm-600pm GAR 0.120
(also listed as LAH 350 )
show description

This course will study a selection of key issues in the history of Western imperialism, beginning at the high point of 'new imperialism' in the late nineteenth century and continuing through the twentieth century to the globalized  world of today.

The themes to be considered  include: the scramble for unclaimed areas of the world at the close of the nineteenth century, World War I as the 'highest stage' of capitalism, the crisis of the 1930s, World War II as a struggle between existing and aspiring imperial powers, the 'second colonial occupation', the rise of nationalism, the decolonisation debate, neo­ colonialism and 'Third World' development, quasi-states and post-colonial  globalization. Each of these subjects would make a course in itself. Taken together, these themes embrace history, contemporary  history, and current affairs, and therefore throw up a range of issues - including new and unorthodox source materials, approaches from allied social sciences, and the question of 'historical perspective' - that either challenge or add to standard historical procedures.

The precise list of topics and the degree of detail in which each can be studied will be determined partly by the need to secure a span of themes and partly by the interests of the students taking the course. Where possible, each topic will be approached through various 'master works' to ensure that students acquire a sense of the quality of original contributions  to historical scholarship as well as a grasp of the substance of particular issues.

 

Texts:

Detailed reading will be provided when the class meets. Relevant studies containing full references to recent scholarship include: the OXFORD HISTORY  OF THE BRITISH EMPIRE (Vols. 4 and 5, 1999), P. J. Cain and A. G. Hopkins, BRITISH IMPERIALISM,

1688-2000 (2001), and A. G. Hopkins, ed. GLOBALIZATION IN WORLD HISTORY (2002).

 

Grading:

85% written (25 pages); 15% seminar contribution

HIS 380L • Imperialism: Classical Debates

39767 • Spring 2013
Meets W 900am-1200pm GAR 4.100
show description

This course will take a historiographical and analytical view of some of the classical contributions to interpreting the phenomenon of imperialism. The aim will be to understand the motives of the authors, the broader influences on their lives and work, the degree to which their views were plausible and illuminating, their subsequent influence, and where they stand today at a time when 'new' forms of imperial history are being invented. The term 'classic' is used with some latitude, though a case can be made for saying that the earliest enduring thoughts on this subject were those of Thucydides and, later, of Ibn Khaldun. This is so because the problem of power in inter-state relations is eternal. As will become clear, it is the forms and purposes taken by the exercise of power that have changed, provoking new explanations from commentators who have tried to understand the novelty of their own times.

The course will focus on modern formulations: on the one hand, the liberal contribution located in the views of Tucker, Smith, Cobden, Mill and Schumpeter, and developing via the work of modern scholars such as Gallagher and Robinson, Platt, Brunschwig, Marseille and others; on the other, the radical inspiration stemming from Marx, continuing through Lenin, and culminating (for the moment at least) in the debate between Old Left and New Left over 'late' capitalism, neo-colonialism, and the dependency thesis.

Each of the classics merits a course in itself. The selection of topics will be illustrative rather than comprehensive. However, the long essay provides scope for expanding the selection chosen for the semester. Each case selected will balance abstract analysis with historical illustrations drawn from the research of scholars who have been inspired by one or more of the 'master works'.

This course complements Course 380L offered in the Fall semester, but can be studied independently.

Detailed reading will be provided when the class meets. Relevant studies that contain either additional references to recent work or helpful assessments of the analytical issues include: the Oxford History of the British Empire (Vol. 5, 1999), P. J. Cain and A. G. Hopkins, British Imperialism, 1688-2000 (2001), Ch.1, Antony Brewer, Marxist Theories of Imperialism (2nd ed. 1990), William Roger Louis, ed. Imperialism: The Gallagher and Robinson Controversy (1976), Roger Owen, and Bob Sutcliffe, eds. Studies in the Theory of Imperialism (1972).    

HIS 350L • History Of Imperialism

39400 • Fall 2012
Meets W 300pm-600pm GAR 2.124
(also listed as LAH 350 )
show description

This course will study a selection of key issues in the history of European expansion overseas, beginning with the mercantilist empires of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, continuing through the era of 'free trade imperialism, and culminating in the so-called 'new imperialism' of the late nineteenth century. The themes to be considered include: the 'world system' of the period, the nature of mercantilism, revisionist views of the chartered companies, the controversy over the acquisition of India in the eighteenth century, the loss of the mainland colonies, the debate over the slave trade and abolition, the rise of free trade, the long-running argument about informal empire, and the nature of 'new' imperialism. 

The ultimate aim of the course is to assist students to understand the evolution of the modern world order as seen through from the perspectives of the major powers of the day, principally Britain, but also other European countries and the United States. The course complements Course 350L offered in the Spring semester (2005), but can be studied independently.

Grading Policy

85% written (3,000 word long essay + three 500 word reports); 15% seminar contribution

Texts

Detailed reading will be provided at the beginning of the semester. Relevant studies containing full references to recent scholarship include: the OXFORD HISTORY OF THE BRITISH EMPIRE (Vols.1 and 2, 1998, and 3 and 5, 1999), and P.J. Cain and A.G. Hopkins, BRITISH IMPERIALISM, 1688-2000 (2001).

HIS 381 • Imperialism: New Imperial Hist

39643 • Fall 2012
Meets W 900am-1200pm GAR 1.122
show description

This course takes a historiographical and analytical view of what has become known as the 'new' imperial history. This term contains a number of uncertainties, but it serves as a convenient summary of a number of disparate trends in the study of Western expansion and imperialism. The implication of the designation 'new' is that there is also an 'old' imperial history. This, too has not been closely defined but it can be taken to refer to the standard or orthodox literature derived from the classic contributions to the subject and represented most recently and most fully in the Oxford History of the British Empire (5 vols. 1998 and 1999). The 'new' history emphasises an alternative set of themes, such as gender, race, environment, cultural representations, First Nations, and globalization, which have come to the fore in the last ten to fifteen years. In assessing this literature, the course will try to determine what is truly new about the 'new' history and to assess whether it is as opposed to the 'old' history as its advocates suggest. This course complements Course 380L offered in the Fall semester, but can be studied independently.

These are large themes and they have generated a large literature. The selection of topics for the semester and the depth to which each can be studied will be determined partly by the need to cover a range of themes and partly by the interests of the students taking the course. An attempt will be made in each case to balance abstract analysis with historical illustrations drawn from new research on these emerging themes. A full bibliography will be provided at the start of the semester. A sample of relevant studies includes: Dane Kennedy, 'The Boundaries of Oxford's Empire', International History Review, 23 (2001), pp.604-2; A. G. Hopkins, 'Back to the Future: From National History to Imperial History', Past & Present, 164 (1999), pp.198-243; A. G. Hopkins, ed. Globalization in World History (2002); Mrinalini Sinha, 'Britain and the Empire: Towards a New Agenda for Imperial History', Radical History Review, 72 (1998), pp.163-74; Catherine Hall, ed., Cultures of Empire: A Reader (2000); David Washbrook, 'Orients and Occidents: Colonial Discourse Theory and the Historiography of the British Empire', in Robin Winks, ed. Oxford History of the British Empire, V (1999), pp.596-611.            

Grading: Long essay and weekly reports. Plus/minus grades will be used.

Students with disabilities may request appropriate academic accommodation from the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities: 471-6259.

 

HIS 350L • History Of Imperialism

39380 • Fall 2011
Meets W 330pm-630pm GAR 2.124
(also listed as LAH 350 )
show description

Designed for Plan I majors in the College of Liberal Arts.

MERCANTILISM TO 'NEW' IMPERIALISM

 

This course will study a selection of key issues in the history of European expansion overseas, beginning with the mercantilist empires of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, and continuing through the era of 'free trade imperialism' that reached its high point in the so-called 'new imperialism' of the late nineteenth century. The themes to be considered include: the 'world system' of the period, the nature of mercantilism, revisionist views of the chartered companies, the controversy over the acquisition of India in the eighteenth century, the loss of the mainland colonies, the debate over the slave trade and abolition, the rise of free trade, the long-running argument about informal empire, and the nature of 'new' imperialism. Each one of these would make a course in itself. The precise list of topics and the degree of detail in which each can be studied will be determined partly by the need to secure a span of themes and partly by the interests of the students taking the course. Where possible, each topic will be approached through various 'master works' to ensure that students acquire a sense of the quality of original contributions to historical scholarship as well as a grasp of the substance of particular issues. The ultimate aim of the course is to assist students to understand why classic works endure, despite endless and often powerful criticism, and hence to be able to trace the roots of much current thinking. What is new may be new for a fresh generation, but it may also have a long and unrecognised lineage in the past. In this way, students should be better able to distinguish between the riddle of the ages and the issue of the day. The course complements Course 350L offered in the Spring semester, but can be studied independently.

 

Detailed reading will be provided at the beginning of the semester. Relevant studies containing full references to recent scholarship include: the Oxford History of the British Empire (Vols.1 and 2, 1998, and 3 and 5, 1999), and P.J. Cain and A.G. Hopkins, British Imperialism, 1688-2000 (2001).  

 

Instructor: Antony G. Hopkins

Course No: 350L: Fall 2011

Title: Above

Substantial Writing Component

Does not meet US legislative requirement for US history

Consent not required

Grading: 85% written (25 pages); 15% seminar contribution

Cross Listings: None

Limit: 20

 

HIS 380L • Imperialism: Classical Debates

39590 • Fall 2011
Meets W 900am-1200pm GAR 1.122
show description

This course will take a historiographical and analytical view of some of the classical contributions to interpreting the phenomenon of imperialism. The aim will be to understand the motives of the authors, the broader influences on their lives and work, the degree to which their views were plausible and illuminating, their subsequent influence, and where they stand today at a time when 'new' forms of imperial history are being invented. The term 'classic' is used with some latitude, though a case can be made for saying that the earliest enduring thoughts on this subject were those of Thucydides and, later, of Ibn Khaldun. This is so because the problem of power in inter-state relations is eternal. As will become clear, it is the forms and purposes taken by the exercise of power that have changed, provoking new explanations from commentators who have tried to understand the novelty of their own times.

The course will focus on modern formulations: on the one hand, the radical inspiration stemming from Marx, continuing through Lenin, and culminating (for the moment at least) in the debate between Old Left and New Left over 'late' capitalism, neo-colonialism, and the dependency thesis; on the other, the liberal debate located in the views of Tucker, Smith, Cobden, Mill and Schumpeter, and developing via the work of modern scholars such as Gallagher and Robinson, Platt, Brunschwig, Marseille and others.

This course complements Course 380L offered in the Spring semester, but can be studied independently.

Each of the classics merits a course in itself. The precise selection of topics and the degree of detail in which they can be studied will be determined partly by the need to secure a span of themes and partly by the interests of the students taking the course. In each case an attempt will be made to balance abstract analysis with historical illustrations drawn from the research of scholars who have been inspired by one or more of the 'master works'.

Detailed reading will be provided when the class meets. Relevant studies that contain either additional references to recent work or helpful assessments of the analytical issues include: the Oxford History of the British Empire (Vol. 5, 1999), P. J. Cain and A. G. Hopkins, British Imperialism, 1688-2000 (2001), Ch.1, Antony Brewer, Marxist Theories of Imperialism (2nd ed. 1990), William Roger Louis, ed. Imperialism: The Gallagher and Robinson Controversy (1976), Roger Owen, and Bob Sutcliffe, eds. Studies in the Theory of Imperialism (1972), Benjamin J. Cohen, The Question of Imperialism (1972).           

HIS 350L • Imperialism: Empir To Globaliz

39690 • Spring 2011
Meets W 400pm-700pm GAR 3.116
(also listed as LAH 350 )
show description

The main aim of this course is to advance your understanding of the world beyond the United States. It is hard to think of a more urgent educational aim in an age of globalization that includes the shock of ‘Nine Eleven’ and the reverberations of the world economic crisis.

HIS 381 • Imperialism: New Imperial Hist

39955 • Spring 2011
Meets W 900am-1200pm GAR 1.122
show description

ANALYTICAL ISSUES IN THE HISTORY OF IMPERIALISM: THE NEW IMPERIAL HISTORY

Instructor: Antony G. Hopkins

Office: Gar 3.310

Office Hours: Wednesday 1.30-3.30 

This course takes a historiographical and analytical view of what has become known as the 'new' imperial history. This term contains a number of uncertainties, but it serves as a convenient summary of a number of disparate trends in the study of Western expansion and imperialism. The implication of the designation 'new' is that there is also an 'old' imperial history. This, too has not been closely defined but it can be taken to refer to the standard or orthodox literature derived from the classic contributions to the subject and represented most recently and most fully in the Oxford History of the British Empire (5 vols. 1998 and 1999). The 'new' history emphasises an alternative set of themes, such as gender, race, environment, cultural representations, First Nations, and globalization, which have come to the fore in the last ten to fifteen years. In assessing this literature, the course will try to determine what is truly new about the 'new' history and to assess whether it is as opposed to the 'old' history as its advocates suggest. This course complements Course 380L offered in the Fall semester, but can be studied independently.

These are large themes and they have generated a large literature. The selection of topics for the semester and the depth to which each can be studied will be determined partly by the need to cover a range of themes and partly by the interests of the students taking the course. An attempt will be made in each case to balance abstract analysis with historical illustrations drawn from new research on these emerging themes. A full bibliography will be provided at the start of the semester. A sample of relevant studies includes: Dane Kennedy, 'The Boundaries of Oxford's Empire', International History Review, 23 (2001), pp.604-2; A. G. Hopkins, 'Back to the Future: From National History to Imperial History', Past & Present, 164 (1999), pp.198-243; A. G. Hopkins, ed. Globalization in World History (2002); Mrinalini Sinha, 'Britain and the Empire: Towards a New Agenda for Imperial History', Radical History Review, 72 (1998), pp.163-74; Catherine Hall, ed., Cultures of Empire: A Reader (2000); David Washbrook, 'Orients and Occidents: Colonial Discourse Theory and the Historiography of the British Empire', in Robin Winks, ed. Oxford History of the British Empire, V (1999), pp.596-611.            

Grading: Long essay and weekly reports. Plus/minus grades will be used.

 

Students with disabilities may request appropriate academic accommodation from the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities: 471-6259.

 

 

HIS 350L • History Of Imperialism

39305 • Fall 2010
Meets W 400pm-700pm PAR 105
show description

This course will study a selection of key issues in the history of European expansion overseas, beginning with the mercantilist empires of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, continuing through the era of 'free trade imperialism, and culminating in the so-called 'new imperialism' of the late nineteenth century. The themes to be considered include: the 'world system' of the period, the nature of mercantilism, revisionist views of the chartered companies, the controversy over the acquisition of India in the eighteenth century, the loss of the mainland colonies, the debate over the slave trade and abolition, the rise of free trade, the long-running argument about informal empire, and the nature of 'new' imperialism.

The ultimate aim of the course is to assist students to understand the evolution of the modern world order as seen through from the perspectives of the major powers of the day, principally Britain, but also other European countries and the United States. The course complements Course 350L offered in the Spring semester (2005), but can be studied independently.

Grading Policy

85% written (3,000 word long essay + three 500 word reports); 15% seminar contribution

Texts

Detailed reading will be provided at the beginning of the semester. Relevant studies containing full references to recent scholarship include: the OXFORD HISTORY OF THE BRITISH EMPIRE (Vols.1 and 2, 1998, and 3 and 5, 1999), and P.J. Cain and A.G. Hopkins, BRITISH IMPERIALISM, 1688-2000 (2001).

This course contains a Writing flag.

HIS 380L • Imperialism: Classical Debates

39515 • Fall 2010
Meets W 900am-1200pm GAR 1.122
show description

This course will take a historiographical and analytical view of some of the classical contributions to interpreting the phenomenon of imperialism. The aim will be to understand the motives of the authors, the broader influences on their lives and work, the degree to which their views were plausible and illuminating, their subsequent influence, and where they stand today at a time when 'new' forms of imperial history is being invented. The term 'classic' is used with some latitude, though a case can be made for saying that the earliest enduring thoughts on this subject were those of Thucydides and, later, of Ibn Khaldun. This is so because the problem of power in inter-state relations is eternal. As will become clear, it is the forms and purposes taken by the exercise of power that have changed, provoking new explanations from commentators who have tried to understand the novelty of their own times.

The course will focus on modern formulations: on the one hand, the radical inspiration stemming from Marx, continuing through Lenin, and culminating (for the moment at least) in the debate between Old Left and New Left over 'late' capitalism, neo-colonialism, and the dependency thesis; on the other, the liberal debate located in the views of Tucker, Smith, Cobden, Mill and Schumpeter, and developing via the work of modern scholars such as Gallagher and Robinson, Platt, Brunschwig, Marseille and others.

This course complements Course 380L offered in the Spring semester, but can be studied independently. 

Each of the classics merits a course in itself. The precise selection of topics and the degree of detail in which they can be studied will be determined partly by the need to secure a span of themes and partly by the interests of the students taking the course. In each case an attempt will be made to balance abstract analysis with historical illustrations drawn from the research of scholars who have been inspired by one or more of the 'master works'.

Texts

Detailed reading will be provided when the class meets. Relevant studies that contain either additional references to recent work or helpful assessments of the analytical issues include: the OXFORD HISTORY OF THE BRITISH EMPIRE (Vol. 5, 1999), P. J. Cain and A. G. Hopkins, BRITISH IMPERIALISM, 1688-2000 (2001), Ch.1, Antony Brewer, MARXIST THEORIES OF IMPERIALISM (2nd ed. 1990), Wm. Roger Louis, ed. IMPERIALISM: THE GALLAGHER AND ROBINSON CONTROVERSY (1976), Roger Owen, and Bob Sutcliffe, eds. STUDIES IN THE THEORY OF IMPERIALISM (1972), Benjamin J. Cohen, THE QUESTION OF IMPERIALISM (1972).           

 

HIS 350L • Imperialism: Empir-Globlz-W

39700 • Spring 2010
Meets W 400pm-700pm GAR 3.116
show description

CONTROVERSIES IN THE HISTORY OF IMPERIALISM: FROM EMPIRES TO GLOBALIZATION

His 350L: Unique 39700; Wed. 4-7 p.m.

Instructor: A. G. Hopkins. Office 3.310; Office Hours Wed. 1:30-3:30 p.m.

The main aim of this course is to advance your understanding of the world beyond the United States. It is hard to think of a more urgent educational aim in an age of globalization that includes the shock of ‘Nine Eleven’ and the reverberations of the world economic crisis.

The formal requirements are:

a) Reading: approximately 150 pages a week. However, you are encouraged to read as widely as possible, using the further references given in the material listed below.

b) Attendance: students are expected to attend and contribute to every session. Absences without good cause may affect the final grade.

c) Presentations: members of the class will be assigned topics and asked to lead the weekly discussion. In doing so, they should produce one page of typed notes on A4 paper.

d) Written reports: three one-page (500 words) summaries/reviews to be submitted on or by 10 February, 3 March, and 24 March.

e) Long essay: one essay of 3,000 words (maximum) presented in hard copy (with footnotes and bibliography) and in double-spaced type. The essay should be given to the secretary in the History office by 5.00pm on Friday 7 May. Please do not e-mail essays.

f) Grades: will be determined by the final essay (75%), and by other written work and class participation (25%).

g) Plagiarism: university rules will be strictly enforced.

Students with disabilities may request appropriate academic support from Services for Students with Disabilities.

The reading that follows should be regarded as a guide and not as a complete statement. Historical Abstracts is an invaluable guide to journal articles on specific subjects, has an excellent index, and links to JSTOR. The Royal Historical Society’s comprehensive Bibliography of Imperial, Colonial and Commonwealth History can be found at: http://www.rhs.ac.uk/bibwel.asp. WorldCat is the most comprehensive source for locating printed materials around the world. This can be used with RLCP (Research Libraries’ Cooperative Program), which allows UT students access to the libraries at Stanford and UC Berkeley, and has advantages over the general inter-library loan system.

Students should pay close attention to their written work. William Strunk and E. B. White, The Elements of Style (4th ed. 2000) is a short book that should be bought and referred to every time you produce written work.

1. Introduction (20 January)

Students who are wholly unfamiliar with the subject should consult: Stephen Howe, Empire: A Very Short Introduction (2002); A. G. Hopkins, ‘Overseas Expansion, Imperialism and Empire, 1815-1914’, in T.C W. Blanning, ed. Short Oxford History of Europe: the Nineteenth Century (2000), pp.210-40. 

2. The Terms of the Trade: Empires and Imperialism (27 January)

Cain and Hopkins, British Imperialism, pp.23-61; OHBE, 3 (1999), pp.1-30; OHBE, 4 (1999), pp.1-46; Dominic Lieven, Empire, (2000), pp.3-51; A. G. Hopkins, ‘Informal Empire in Argentina: An Alternative View’, Jour. Latin American Stud., 26 (1994), pp.469-84.

3. ‘New’ Imperialism? (3 February)

Robert Aldrich, Greater France (1996), pp.68-114, 234-56; Cain and Hopkins, British Imperialism, Ch. 11, pp.303-39; Frank Ninkovich, The United States and Imperialism (2001), pp.9-47; OHBE, 3 (1999): any one (or more) of chs. 7-16.   

4. Empires and War, 1914-18: The Highest Stage of Imperialism? (10 February)

Cain and Hopkins, British Imperialism, Ch. 14, pp.383-96; OHBE, 4 (1999), pp. 114-37; OHBE, 5 (1999), pp.342-65; Christopher Andrew and A. S. Kanya-Forstner, France Overseas: The Great War and the Climax of French Imperialism (1981), Chs. 1-2.

5. Managing Empires: India, and Africa, 1918-39 (17 February)

Cain and Hopkins, British Imperialism, pp.541-92; OHBE, 4 (1999), pp.232-79, 421-46, 515-73. Aldrich, Greater France,  pp.199-233.

6. Informal Empire? Latin America and China, 1918-39 (24 February)

Cain and Hopkins, British Imperialism, pp. 521-40, 593-616; OHBE, 4 (1999), pp.623-666; OHBE, 5 (1999), pp.379-402, 437-49; Ninkovich, The United States and Imperialism, pp.164-81.

7. The Economic Crisis and the Route to War, 1929-37/39 (3 March)

Cain and Hopkins, British Imperialism, pp.403-88, and relevant sections of Chs. 21-25; Raymond F. Betts, France and Decolonization, 1900-1960 (1991), pp.19-48. 

8. Term Paper: Discussion (10 March)

Students to bring a one-page outline of their proposed long essay including a bibliography drawn from (among other sources) Historical Abstracts, and the other sources listed in the introductory statement above.

SPRING BREAK (17 March)

9. World War II and the Struggle for Empire, 1937/9-1945 (24 March)

OHBE, 4 (1999), pp.306-328; Ian Clark, Globalization and Fragmentation (1997), pp.99-121; R. F. Holland, European Decolonization, 1918-1981 (1985), pp. 37-69; Betts, France and Decolonization (1991), pp.49-64

10. The Second Colonial Occupation, 1945-55 (31 March)

Cain and Hopkins, British Imperialism, pp. 619-40; Betts, France and Decolonization (1991), pp. 65-77; Holland, European Decolonization, pp.73-149.

11. Colonial Nationalism (7 April)

Aldrich, Greater France, pp. 266-306; W. David McIntyre, British Decolonization (1998), pp. 95-9; OHBE, 4 (1999), any case studies from Chs. 18, 20, 22, 23, 26, and/or John D. Hargreaves, Decolonization in Africa (2nd ed.1996), pp.72-89, 121-57.

12. Decolonisation and the Transfer of Power, 1945-65 (14 April)

OHBE, 4 (1999), pp.329-56; OHBE, 5 (1999), pp.541-57; Cain and Hopkins, British Imperialism, pp.619-40; W. David McIntyre, British Decolonization, pp.1-94, 101-118, and/or Holland, European Decolonization, pp.153-248.

13. Neocolonialism – and Independence, 1947-1991 (21 April)

McIntyre, British Decolonization, pp.119-32; Aldrich, Greater France, pp.307-25; Lieven, Empire, pp.343-411 (or segments); Ian Clark, Globalization and Fragmentation (1997), pp.122-71.

14. The United States: From Triumph to Trauma, 1991-2008 (28 April)

Ninkovich, The United States and Imperialism, pp.200-54; A. G. Hopkins, ed. Globalization in World History (Norton, US ed., 2002), pp.244-63; Clark, Globalization and Fragmentation (1997), pp.172-202; Current History (Special Issue on Iraq), January 2006.   

15. Globalization and Imperialism: The Shapes of Things to Come? (5 May)

Cain and Hopkins, British Imperialism, pp. 661-81; A. G. Hopkins, ed. Globalization in World History (Norton, US ed., 2002), pp. vii-ix, 1-44, 73-98, 244-63, and selections from pp.167-95, 196-220, 221-43; any sections of Manfred B. Steger, Globalization: A Very Short History (2003, 2nd ed. 2009).

AGH, December 2009

HIS 381 • Imperialism: New Imperial Hist

39915 • Spring 2010
Meets W 900-1200 GAR 1.122
show description

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of the graduate adviser. 


May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

 

HIS 350L • History Of Imperialism-W

40085 • Fall 2009
Meets TH 330pm-630pm GAR 2.112
show description

Lectures, discussion, reading, and research on selected topics in the field of history.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Designed for History majors. 

History 350L and 350R may not both be counted unless the topics vary.

Course carries Writing flag. 

HIS 380L • Imperialism: Classical Debates

40215 • Fall 2009
Meets TH 930-1230pm GAR 1.122
show description

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of the graduate adviser.


May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

 

HIS 350L • Imperialism: Empir-Globlz-W

39189 • Spring 2009
Meets W 400pm-700pm GAR 2.124
show description

Lectures, discussion, reading, and research on selected topics in the field of history.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Designed for History majors. 

History 350L and 350R may not both be counted unless the topics vary.

Course carries Writing flag. 

HIS 381 • Imperialism: New Imperial Hist

39340 • Spring 2009
Meets W 900-1200 GAR 1.122
show description

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of the graduate adviser. 


May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

 

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