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Alan Tully, Chair 128 Inner Campus Dr., Stop B7000, GAR 1.104 Austin, TX 78712-1739 • 512-471-3261

Alison K. Frazier

Associate Professor Ph.D., 1997, Columbia University

Alison K. Frazier

Contact

  • Phone: 512-475-6375
  • Office: GAR 2.148
  • Office Hours: Spring 2014: F 2-4 p.m. & by appointment
  • Campus Mail Code: B7000

Biography

Research interests

Machiavelli and trauma; humanist contributions to the breviary; hexameral commentary in the Renaissance; editions of Renaissance saints' Lives; census of the hagiographic collection entitled Sanctuarium (Milan c. 1478).

 

Courses taught

Medieval and Renaissance Continental Europe, especially intellectual history, religion, hagiography, biblical exegesis, manuscripts and printing

HIS 309K • West Civ In Medvl Times-Pl II

39285 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 800am-900am GAR 1.126
show description

This introductory, writing-intensive course surveys the history of the Mediterranean basin and European archipelago from about 300-1500. By mixing lecture, discussion, reading, and writing, we will trace the emergence of distinctive Latin Christian, Byzantine, and Islamic civilizations, which superseded the classical Greek and Roman ones. We examine how these new civilizations interacted to form western traditions of politics, religion, family structure, law, and economic thought.

Course organization and optional textbook provide a basic chronological narrative. Our emphasis will be on historical thinking through critical work with a variety of primary sources and occasional secondary ones. This course has no prerequisites and assumes no prior knowledge of the subject, but students are presumed to be capable of critical reflection upon both lectures and readings.

 

Texts:

Augustine, Confessions (tr. Chadwick)

Bede, Ecclesiastical History of the English People (tr. Farmer)

Benedict of Nursia, Rule (tr. Meisel / del Mastro)

Anselm of Canterbury, The Major Works

Abelard and Heloise, Letters and Other Writings (tr. Levitan)

Chrétien de Troyes, Lancelot, the Knight of the Cart (tr. Raffel)

De Hamel, British Library Guide to Manuscript Illumination

 

Grading:

4 short writing projects (2-3 pp) on assigned topics 20%

Revision of one of those short projects 10%

Manuscript project (group work) 10%

Final writing project (5-10 pp)

first draft 20%

peer evaluation 10%

Small group work, quizzes, in-class writing 10%

Portfolio with second/third draft of final essay 20%

HIS 347L • Seminar In Historiography

39875 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm GAR 1.122
show description

SEMINAR IN HISTORIOGRAPHY: HONORS PROGRAM

Open only to students admitted to the History Honors program.

This seminar introduces students to a range of historical methods, topics, and sources, with no claim to being comprehensive. We will consider how “history” has changed along with other forms of knowledge. We will read different kinds of history (social, intellectual, cultural, and so on). We emphasize research with primary sources that students will be able to use in their theses.

Faculty from the Department of History will lead discussions about their areas of expertise, giving the class examples of documents and sources that historians use, or showing how they generate questions for research.  By the end of the semester, each student will have come up with an advisor and a prospectus for the senior thesis she or he will write next year.

This is a reading- and writing-intensive course, and it moves quickly from introductory to advanced work.

 REQUIREMENTS:

1)   preparation for and participation in each weekly seminar, including short writing assignments (40%). Reading is about 200 pages a week.

2)   the various steps in drafting and revising a 10-12 page research prospectus as described below (60%). The preliminary stages of research entail reading at least 10-15 books, review essays, and articles.

You will meet with me individually to consult on your topic a little over halfway through the semester. Short topic statements and bibliography are due a week later. We will spend the last three weeks of class in editorial session: discussing the structure, prose, style, and subject of each prospectus.

PROSPECTUS

         A prospectus is a “description in advance of a proposed undertaking.” It sets out your topic based on preliminary research. It should identify the problem or event that will be investigated, explain why it is important, survey the historical literature on the subject, describe the primary sources you will use, and discuss how you intend to carry out the work.

 The prospectus is not binding; you will certainly change your topic in some way during your senior year, and you may change it entirely. It is nonetheless very important preparation. It also requires substantial background work. I expect you to have looked at and read in at least 10 books, articles, and review essays.

The prospectus should also include a bibliography and four to six photocopied samples of primary sources. You may discuss the usefulness of the sources in either the text of the prospectus or in notes attached to the copies of the sources.

HIS 350L • Europe & Mediterran 400-1700

39885 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 930am-1100am GDC 2.410
show description

This upper-division, writing-intensive seminar examines the emergence of a recognizably European culture in the context of changing Mediterranean cultures. Through reading, discussion, and writing, students consider the variety of political, legal, religious, military, intellectual, and even amorous encounters facilitated by the Sea. From urban centers of the merchant  elites, to the peasant agriculture of grape and olive, from translators and other such middlemen, to  sailors and pirates, the human element informs students’ composition of three essays of graduated difficulty.  Expect about 100pp of reading a week; weekly quizzes and/or reading worksheets.

In addition to primary sources such as financial documents, maps,  letters, crusading literature, local histories, and travel diaries, readings may include selections from the following:

Abulafia, Great Sea (2011)

Benison, Great Caliphs (2011)

Braudel, Mediterranean and responses, e.g. by Shaw, Molho

Dursteler, Renegade Women (2011)

Goitein, A Mediterranean Society (1999)

Green, Catholic Pirates (2010)

Harris, ed., Re-Thinking the Mediterranean (2005)

Horden and Purcell, The Corrupting Sea (2000)

McCormick, Origins of the European Economy (2001)

Pirenne, Mohammed and Charlemagne (1937) and responses, e.g. by Brown, Squatriti

Wickham, Framing the Early Middle Ages (2005)

Grading:

Three essays of graduated length and difficulty, each with peer-reviewed first drafts and office visits with the professor (10%, 20%, 30%); weekly quizzes and/or reading worksheets (30%); regular attendance and participation (10%).

HIS 309K • West Civ In Medvl Times-Pl II

39600 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm PAR 304
show description

This introductory, writing-intensive course surveys the cultural history of the Mediterranean basin and European archipelago from about 400-1400. In lecture, discussion, reading, and writing, we examine the formation of western traditions still influential today. Course organization and optional textbook provide a basic chronological narrative, but historical thinking through critical work with major primary sources is our focus. This course has no prerequisites and assumes no prior knowledge of the subject. Students are presumed to be capable of critical reflection upon both lectures and readings.

Texts:

Augustine, Confessions (tr. Chadwick)

Bede, Ecclesiastical History of the English People (tr. Farmer)

Benedict of Nursia, Rule (tr. Meisel / del Mastro)

Anselm of Canterbury, The Major Works

Abelard and Heloise, Letters and Other Writings (tr. Levitan)

Chrétien de Troyes, Lancelot, the Knight of the Cart (tr. Raffel)

De Hamel, British Library Guide to Manuscript Illumination

Grading:

4 short writing projects (2-3 pp) on assigned topics 20%

Revision of one of those short projects 10%

Manuscript project (group work) 10%

Final writing project (5-10 pp)first draft 20%

peer evaluation 10%

Small group work, quizzes, in-class writing 10%

Portfolio with second/third draft of final essay 20%

HIS S343G • Italian Renaissance, 1350-1550

85455 • Summer 2013
Meets MTWTHF 830am-1000am CLA 0.122
(also listed as EUS S346, R S S357 )
show description

This upper-division course combines lecture, group work, and discussion to introduce the political, social, economic, and cultural phenomena that made the Italian peninsula such a lively place between 1350 and 1550. Drawing on a wide range of primary sources, we examine cultural production in many realms of human experience. Emphasis falls upon the “recovery of learning” and its effect on areas ranging from religion and gender, to economics, politics, technology, and art.

This course aims to teach the analysis of historical evidence. By semester’s end, you will have read some of the most influential and controversial works from this period. You will be able to put them in historical context, to describe how historians use them, and to explain why they remain compelling today.

This course has no prerequisites and assumes no prior knowledge of the subject, but students are presumed to be capable of critical reflection upon both lectures and readings.

Texts:

Boccaccio, Decameron

Alberti, On the Family

Machiavelli, Mandragola

Castiglione, The Courtier

Vasari, Lives of the Artists

Aretino, Master of the Horse

Grading:

Quizzes

Reading worksheets

Two essay exams

HIS 309K • West Civ In Medvl Times-Pl II

39280 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 800am-930am GAR 2.124
show description

This lower-division, writing-intensive course introduces the history of the European archipelago from about 800bce-1500ce. Through lecture, discussion, reading, and writing, we examine three defining facets of western experience:  the Carolingian Empire; the Crusades; and the Black Death. Emphasis is on historical thinking through critical work with primary sources. This course has no prerequisites and assumes no prior knowledge of the subject. Students are presumed to be capable of critical reflection upon both lectures and readings. 

Objectives. By the end of this course you should be able to 1.) describe the three key historical developments; 2.) identify major figures in these developments and assess their contributions; 3.) analyze medieval texts with awareness of authorship, audience, genre, and scribal culture; 4.) explain the contributions of these three medieval developments to our contemporary world. 

This course bears a Writing Flag. Writing flag courses are designed to give students experience with writing in an academic discipline. In this class, you can expect to write regularly during the semester, to complete a variety of writing projects, and to receive feedback from your instructor to help you improve your writing. You will also have the opportunity to revise your assignments, and to read and discuss your peers’ work. 

This course bears a Global Cultures Flag. Global cultures courses are designed to increase your familiarity with cultural groups outside the United States.You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least one non-U.S. cultural group, past or present.

HIS F343G • Italian Renaissance, 1350-1550

85505 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTHF 830am-1000am GAR 1.126
(also listed as EUS F346, R S F357, WGS F340 )
show description

Description. This upper-division course combines lecture, group work, and discussion to introduce the political, social, economic, and cultural phenomena that made the Italian peninsula such a lively place between 1350 and 1550. Drawing on a wide range of primary sources, we examine cultural production in many realms of human experience. Emphasis falls upon the “recovery of learning” and its effect on areas ranging from religion and gender, to economics, politics, technology, and art.

 

This course aims to teach the analysis of historical evidence. By semester’s end, you will have read some of the most influential and controversial works from this period. You will be able to put them in historical context, to describe how historians use them, and to explain why they remain compelling today.

 

This course has no prerequisites and assumes no prior knowledge of the subject, but students are presumed to be capable of critical reflection upon both lectures and readings.

 

Readings may include:

Boccaccio, Decameron

            Alberti, On the Family

            Machiavelli, Mandragola

            Castiglione, The Courtier

            Vasari, Lives of the Artists

            Aretino, Master of the Horse

 

Assignments include:

            Quizzes

            Reading responses

            Two exams

 

 

HIS 309K • West Civ In Medvl Times-Pl II

39135 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm GAR 2.112
show description

This introductory, writing-intensive course surveys the history of the Mediterranean basin and European archipelago from about 300-1500. By mixing lecture, discussion, reading, and writing, we will trace the emergence of distinctive Latin Christian, Byzantine, and Islamic civilizations, which superseded the classical Greek and Roman ones. We examine how these new civilizations interacted to form western traditions of politics, religion, family structure, law, and economic thought.

Course organization and optional textbook provide a basic chronological narrative. Our emphasis will be on historical thinking through critical work with a variety of primary sources and occasional secondary ones. This course has no prerequisites and assumes no prior knowledge of the subject, but students are presumed to be capable of critical reflection upon both lectures and readings.

 

Course Readings

Augustine, Confessions (tr. Chadwick)

Bede, Ecclesiastical History of the English People (tr. Farmer)

Benedict of Nursia, Rule (tr. Meisel / del Mastro)

Anselm of Canterbury, The Major Works

Abelard and Heloise, Letters and Other Writings (tr. Levitan)

Chrétien de Troyes, Lancelot, the Knight of the Cart (tr. Raffel)

De Hamel, British Library Guide to Manuscript Illumination

Shorter required readings, which you will find on Blackboard (bb) under

“Course Documents,” are listed below in the schedule of meetings.

 

Your final grade will be based on the following work and weighting:

4 short writing projects (2-3 pp) on assigned topics 20%

Revision of one of those short projects 10%

Manuscript project (group work) 10%

Final writing project (5-10 pp)

first draft 20%

peer evaluation 10%

Small group work, quizzes, in-class writing 10%

Portfolio with second/third draft of final essay 20%

Include a descriptive table of contents.

 

HIS 301F • The Premodern World

39075 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm UTC 3.112
(also listed as AHC 310 )
show description

Description

“Premodern World” is a lower-division, lecture course that provides an overview of global development from roughly 30,000 BCE to 1500 CE. By the end of the semester, students should be able to: 1) define “civilization” and explain theories about the rise and fall of civilizations; 2) compare political, cultural, and socio-economic aspects of premodern societies across Eurasia, Africa, and the Americas; and 3) identify cross-cultural encounters that have had a lasting impact on global history. This team-taught, entry-level course aims to teach historical thinking as well as historical content, to impart a basic grasp of the premodern past as well as to stimulate the development of large-scale frameworks for historical analysis. Although this course has no prerequisites and assumes no prior knowledge of the subject, students are presumed to be capable of critical reflection upon both lectures and readings.

Readings. Available for purchase (p) at the Co-op or for download from Blackboard (bb):

Strayer, Ways of the World, A Brief Global History with Sources volume I (p)

Anonymous, Epic of Gilgamesh, tr. D. Ferry (p)

Sima Qian, The First Emperor, tr. R. Dawson (p)

Marco Polo, Travels, tr. R. Latham (p)

Ross Dunn, The Adventures of Ibn Battuta (p)

excerpt from Jared Diamond, Collapse (bb)

excerpt from Ammianus Marcellinus, Histories (bb) e

excerpt from Epictetus, Handbook (bb)

P. A. McAnany & T. G. Negron, "Bellicose Rulers and Climatological Peril" in Questioning Collapse, ed. P. A. McAnany & Norman Yoffee (bb)

Asoka's Rock Edict XIII (bb)

Requirements. Students are expected:

*to attend all lectures*to prepare all reading assignments thoughtfully by beginning of the week*to respond to at least six of eight reading worksheets and submit them before class through Blackboard (by 10pmon the required date)*to participate regularly and responsibly in worksheet-based discussions*to complete at least six of the eight short factual quizzes*to complete the three non-cumulative exams

Grading procedure. The three non-cumulative exams will consist of both short answer and essay questions, and will together comprise 60% of the course grade. Eight short, factual, multiple-choice quizzes based on the assigned textbook readings will be administered on Mondays – six of these will count toward the course grade. A series of eight reading worksheets will accompany our non-textbook sources; six will count towards the course grade. Attendance and participation is another component of your final grade. The various aspects of student performance are weighted:

exam 1 = 20%

exam 2 = 20%

exam 3 = 20% (during final exam period)

6 quizzes = 15% (cannot be made up)

6 reading worksheets = 20% (must be turned in before class)

attendance & participation = 5%

We will NOT be using pluses and minuses for the course grade.

Attendance policy. You are counted present only if you are in class for the entire period. Emergencies will of course be accommodated, but departures immediately following a quiz reflect poorly upon you.

You are allowed two absences no questions asked. After that, unexcused absences will adversely affect your grade. Excused absences require a note to the professors ahead of time insofar as possible. For unexpected absences due to illness or accident, notify us of your situation as soon as possible and document it immediately upon your return.

Quizzes and reading worksheets cannot be made up. Make-up exams will be administered only with the consent of the professors and at their convenience.

HIS 343G • Italian Renaissance, 1350-1550

39595 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 900am-1000am GAR 1.126
(also listed as AHC 330, R S 357, WGS 340 )
show description

This upper-division course combines lecture and discussion to introduce the political, social, economic, and cultural phenomena that made the Italian peninsula such a lively place between 1350 and 1550. Drawing on a range of primary source readings, we will analyze continuity and change in many realms of human experience. Emphasis will be placed upon the “recovery of learning” and its effect on areas ranging from religion and gender, to economics, technology, and art. 

The aim of this course is to help you become more thoughtful about historical analysis of continuity and change in such contentious fields as politics, gender, and religion. By semester’s end, you will have read some of the most influential and controversial works from this period, and will be able to put them in historical context and explain why they remain compelling today. 

This course has no prerequisites and assumes no prior knowledge of the subject, but students are presumed to be capable of critical reflection upon both lectures and readings.

Assignments include:

    Map quiz

    Reading worksheets 

    Two essay exams

Readings may include:

Boccaccio, Decameron 

Alberti, On Painting 

Machiavelli, Discourses

Nogarola, Letters 

Castiglione, The Courtier 

Aretino, Master of the Horse

HIS 350L • Creation

39675 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm GAR 1.134
(also listed as EUS 346, R S 373, WGS 345 )
show description

HIS 350L

This senior-level, writing-intensive seminar examines interpretations of Genesis 1-3 in the premodern world. By reading authors from Plato to Galileo, and by considering a variety of religious traditions, students investigate the rich variety of responses to the idea of Creation. In conversation, students explore together the implications of arguments about Creation for early developments in western theology, science, and philosophy. Reading worksheets and small group work help students learn to articulate their responses fully.

By the end of the semester, you will be able to describe how premodern efforts to understand Genesis 1-3 affected developments in science, philosophy, and theology. You will have written essays leading to a research paper that deepens your knowledge in a specialized area and develops your analytic skills.

This course has no prerequisites and assumes no prior knowledge of the subject, but students are presumed to be capable of critical reflection upon readings and discussion.

A SEMINAR IS NOT A LECTURE COURSE. YOUR CAREFUL PREPARATION OF ALL ASSIGNMENTS IS REQUIRED FOR THE COURSE TO WORK.

Readings may include

Plato, Timaeus

Augustine, Genesis against the Manichees

Selections from al-Tabari

Selections from Maimonides

Selections from Thomas Aquinas

Selections from Luther’s Sermons

Galileo, Letter to Queen Christina

Assignments may include

Map quiz

Reading worksheets

Two essays of graduated length (3/5 pp)

Final research paper (8-10pp)

 

HIS 309K • The Premodern World

32050 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am WAG 101
(also listed as AHC 310, HIS 301F )
show description

UT-Austin                                     PREMODERN WORLD                                    Fall 2010
                                          HIS 301f (#38985) // AHC 310 (#32050)
MWF 10 to 11 am                                                                                             WAG 101

Description.

“Premodern World” is a lower-division, lecture course that provides an overview of global development from roughly 30,000 BCE to 1500 CE. By the end of the semester, students should be able to: 1) define “civilization” and explain theories about the rise and fall of civilizations; 2) compare political, cultural, and socio-economic aspects of premodern societies across Eurasia, Africa, and the Americas; and 3) identify cross-cultural encounters that have had a lasting impact on global history. This team-taught, entry-level course aims to teach historical thinking as well as historical content, to impart a basic grasp of the premodern past as well as to stimulate the development of large-scale frameworks for historical analysis. Although this course has no prerequisites and assumes no prior knowledge of the subject, students are presumed to be capable of critical reflection upon both lectures and readings.

Professor and TA information.

Prof. A. Frazier                                               Prof. C. Talbot                                      Hadi Hosainy, TA
akfrazier@mail.utexas.edu
                        ctalbot@mail.utexas.edu                         hadi.hoss@gmail.com
Office: GAR 2.148                                     Office: GAR 3.106                                    Office: Burdine 310
Hrs: T 3-5pm & by apptmt.                        Hrs: M 11-12 & F 1:30-3:30                        Hrs. W 2-4 pm

Readings. Available for purchase (p) at the Co-op or for download from Blackboard (bb):

Strayer, Ways of the World, A Brief Global History with Sources volume I (p)

Anonymous, Epic of Gilgamesh, tr. D. Ferry (p)

Sima Qian, The First Emperor, tr. R. Dawson (p)

Marco Polo, Travels, tr. R. Latham (p)

Ross Dunn, The Adventures of Ibn Battuta (p)

excerpt from Jared Diamond, Collapse (bb)

excerpt from Ammianus Marcellinus, Histories (bb) e

excerpt from Epictetus, Handbook (bb)

P. A. McAnany & T. G. Negron, "Bellicose Rulers and Climatological Peril" in Questioning Collapse, ed. P. A. McAnany & Norman Yoffee (bb)

Asoka's Rock Edict XIII (bb)

Requirements. Students are expected:

*to attend all lectures
*to prepare all reading assignments thoughtfully by beginning of the week
*to respond to at least six of eight reading worksheets and submit them before class through Blackboard (by 10pm
on the required date)
*to participate regularly and responsibly in worksheet-based discussions
*to complete at least six of the eight short factual quizzes
*to complete the three non-cumulative exams

Grading procedure. The three non-cumulative exams will consist of both short answer and essay questions, and will together comprise 60% of the course grade. Eight short, factual, multiple-choice quizzes based on the assigned textbook readings will be administered on Mondays – six of these will count toward the course grade. A series of eight reading worksheets will accompany our non-textbook sources; six will count towards the course grade. Attendance and participation is another component of your final grade. The various aspects of student performance are weighted:

exam 1 (Sept. 24)                                  = 20%
exam 2 (Oct. 22)                                    = 20%
exam 3 (Dec. 8)                                     = 20% (during final exam period)
6 quizzes                                               = 15% (cannot be made up)
6 reading worksheets                              = 20% (must be turned in before class)
attendance & participation                        = 5%

We will NOT be using pluses and minuses for the course grade this semester.

Attendance policy. You are counted present only if you are in class for the entire period. Emergencies will of course be accommodated, but departures immediately following a quiz reflect poorly upon you.

You are allowed two absences no questions asked. After that, unexcused absences will adversely affect your grade. Excused absences require a note to the professors ahead of time insofar as possible. For unexpected absences due to illness or accident, notify us of your situation as soon as possible and document it immediately upon your return.

Quizzes and reading worksheets cannot be made up. Make-up exams will be administered only with the consent of the professors and at their convenience.

Religious holy days sometimes conflict with class and examination schedules. It is the policy of UT-Austin that you must notify each of your instructors at least fourteen days prior to the classes scheduled on dates you will be absent to observe a religious holy day.

Policy on special accommodations. At the beginning of the semester, students who need special accommodations should notify the instructor by presenting a letter prepared by the Services for Students with Disabilities (SDD) Office. To ensure that the most appropriate accommodations can be provided, students should contact the SSD Office at 471-6259 or 471-4641 TTY.

Read more at:            http://www.utexas.edu/diversity/ddce/ssd/

Academic integrity. Students who violate University rules on scholastic dishonesty are subject to disciplinary penalties, including the possibility of failure in the course and/or dismissal from the University. Since such dishonesty harms the individual, all students, and the integrity of the University, policies on scholastic dishonesty will be strictly enforced.

Read details at:            http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs/scholdis.php

Blackboard and laptop/messaging device policy. We will use the course web site on Blackboard to post assignments and make announcements relating to the course – check the site regularly (at least weekly) for new information. It is your responsibility to maintain a functioning email account linked to Blackboard.

Read university policy at: http://www.utexas.edu/its/policies/emailnotify/html

All students have the right to learn in a supportive environment: don’t let your use of a laptop or mobile device distract others. All laptops and mobile messaging devices must be turned off and stored away during quizzes and examinations. Their use, WITHOUT ANY SOUND, is acceptable during lectures or class discussions for note-taking or instructor-directed web- surfing.

To record audio or visuals of lectures you must have a written consent from both professors.

Keep in touch! If you are having difficulty with the course or must be absent for a period due to personal issues, stop by during office hours or be in touch by email. Don’t wait until weeks have passed and it’s too late to catch up. The professors and TA for this course sincerely want you to succeed.

*****************************************************

Schedule of Class Meetings & Readings

 

PART I -- Taking A Global View: Civilization & Its Consequences

 

Wk 1. INTRODUCTION

W 25 Aug            Introduction to Course

F 27 Aug            Maps & Mapping

reading: Strayer, Ways, Ch1. “First Peoples, To 10,000 BCE.”

 

Wk 2. AGRICULTURE & ITS IMPACTS

M 30 Aug quiz 1 (on Strayer ch. 2); Paleolithic Art

W 1 Sept. Agricultural Transitions

F 3 Sept. Food Production & the Fertile Crescent

reading: Strayer, Ways, Ch2. “First Farmers, 10,000 BCE-3000 BCE.”

 

Wk 3. THE FIRST CIVILIZATIONS

M 6 Sept. Labor Day Holiday

W 8 Sept. The Urban Revolution in Mesopotamia

F 10 Sept. Other River Valley Civilizations

reading: begin Epic of Gilgamesh; Strayer, Ways, Ch3. “First Civilizations, 3500 BCE-500 BCE.”

 

Wk 4. VARYING TRAJECTORIES OF DEVELOPMENT

M 13 Sept. quiz 2 (Strayer ch. 3 & 7); Ruling, Writing, and Gilgamesh

                        reading worksheet 1 due 10 pm, Tues. Sept. 14

W 15 Sept. discussion: Defining Civilization with Gilgamesh

F 17 Sept. Mesoamerica & the Classical Maya

reading: finish Epic of Gilgamesh; Strayer, Ways, Ch7. “Classical Era Variations: Africa & Americas.”

 

Wk 5. SUMMING UP: GLOBAL PATTERNS IN EARLY HISTORY

M 20 Sept. Sub-Saharan Africa & the Bantu Migrations

            reading worksheet 2 due 10 pm, Tues. Sept. 21

W 22 Sept. discussion: Considering Civilizational Collapse

F 24 Sept. EXAM 1

reading: Jared Diamond, "Prologue" (pp. 1-23) & "The Maya Collapses" (pp. 157-77) in Collapse: How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed (bb); P. A. McAnany & T. G. Negron, "Bellicose Rulers and Climatological Peril" in Questioning Collapse, ed. P. A. McAnany & Norman Yoffee (bb).

 

PART II -- Comparative History: Classical Cultures, 500 BCE to 500 CE

 

Wk 6. RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY IN THE AXIAL AGE

M 27 Sept. quiz 3 (Strayer ch. 5); Buddha and Confucius

W 29 Sept. Moses, Socrates, Jesus

            reading worksheet 3 due 10 pm, Thurs. Sept. 30

F 1 Oct. discussion: Axial Age Religions

reading: Strayer, Ways, Ch5. “Eurasian Cultural Traditions, 500 BCE-500 CE.” Epictetus, selection from Handbook (bb)

 

Wk 7. POLITICS OF EMPIRE IN ASIA

M 4 Oct. quiz 4 (Strayer ch. 4); First Emperor & His Han Successors

W 6 Oct. Asoka’s Empire and Message of Dharma

            reading worksheet 4 due 10 pm, Thurs. Oct. 7

F 8 Oct. discussion: The Chinese Imperial Tradition Begins

reading: Strayer, Ways, Ch4. “Eurasian Empires, 500 BCE-500 CE;” Asoka's Rock

Edict XIII; Sima Qian, First Emperor, pp. xxii-xxxiv, 23-52 & 61-94.

 

Wk. 8. POLITICS OF EMPIRE IN THE WEST

M 11 Oct. quiz 5 (Strayer ch. 6); Rome & Its Imperial Predecessors

W 13 Oct. Fall of the Roman Empire

            reading worksheet 5 due 10 pm, Thurs. Oct. 14

F 15 Oct. discussion: Barbarians at the Gates

reading: Strayer, Ways, Ch6. “Eurasian Social Hierarchies, 500 BCE-500 CE;” Ammianus Marcellinus selection (bb)

 

Wk 9. SUMMING UP CLASSICAL EMPIRES AND CULTURES

M 18 Oct. Comparing Empires: Han & Roman

W 20 Oct. Comparing Religions in Late Antiquity

F 22 Oct. EXAM 2

 

PART III -- Cross-Cultural History: Spread of Civilizations, 500-1500

 

Wk 10. EXPANDING ECONOMIC & CULTURAL SPHERES

M 25 Oct. Silk, Sea, and Sand Roads: An Overview

W 27 Oct. Sinification of Central & East Asia

F 29 Oct. film: “Islam: Empire of Faith, Pt. 1: The Messenger”

reading: Strayer, Ways, Ch8. “Commerce and Culture, 500-1500;”

Strayer, Ways, Ch9. “China & World: East Asian Connections.”

 

Wk 11. SPREAD OF ISLAM & CHRISTIANITY

M 1 Nov. quiz 6 (Strayer ch. 10 & 11); Islamic Spain

W 3 Nov. Perspectives on the Crusades

            reading worksheet 6 due 10 pm Thurs. Nov. 4

F 5 Nov. discussion: Marco Polo and the Literature of Travel

reading: Strayer, Ways, Ch10. “Worlds of European Christendom, 500-1300;” Strayer, Ways, Ch11. “Worlds of Islam: Afro-Eurasia, 600-1500;” Marco Polo, Travels, “Prologue” (pp. 33-45)

 

Wk 12. TRAVEL IN THE MONGOL WORLD: MARCO POLO

M 8 Nov. quiz 7 (Strayer ch. 12); Genghis Khan & the Mongol Empire

W 10 Nov. Marco Polo and the Pax Mongolica

            reading worksheet 7 due 10 pm, Thurs. Nov. 11

F 12 Nov. discussion: Marco Polo and Trade Diasporas

reading: Strayer, Ways, Ch12. “Pastoral Peoples ... Mongol Moment, 1200-1500.”

Marco Polo, Travels,"Kubilai Khan" (pp. 113-62)


Wk 13.
TRAVEL IN THE ISLAMIC WORLD: IBN BATTUTA

M 15 Nov. Islam in the Eastern World

W 17 Nov. Cultures in Contact in Africa

            reading worksheet 8 due 10 pm, Thurs. Nov. 18

F 19 Nov. discussion: Ibn Battuta and the Traveller’s Gaze

reading: Dunn, Ibn Battuta, pp. 1-12,183-212 (optional: 213-40), 290-320.

 

Wk 14. THE FIFTEENTH CENTURY

M 22 Nov. quiz 8 (Strayer ch. 13); Renaissance in Europe

W 24 Nov. Rise of the Ottoman Empire

F 26 Nov. Thanksgiving Holiday

reading: Strayer, Ways, Ch13. “The Worlds of the Fifteenth Century.”

 

Wk 15. SUMMING UP: CROSS-CULTURAL ENCOUNTERS, 500-1500

M 29 Nov. Global Connections

W 1 Dec. Review worksheet & discussion

F 3 Dec. NO CLASS MEETING, Professors hold extra office hours

 

EXAM 3 on Wed. December 8, 2:00-5:00 pm

This course contains a Global Cultures flag.

HIS 301F • The Premodern World

38985 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am WAG 101
(also listed as AHC 310, HIS 309K )
show description

UT-Austin                                     PREMODERN WORLD                                    Fall 2010
                                          HIS 301f (#38985) // AHC 310 (#32050)
MWF 10 to 11 am                                                                                             WAG 101

Description.

“Premodern World” is a lower-division, lecture course that provides an overview of global development from roughly 30,000 BCE to 1500 CE. By the end of the semester, students should be able to: 1) define “civilization” and explain theories about the rise and fall of civilizations; 2) compare political, cultural, and socio-economic aspects of premodern societies across Eurasia, Africa, and the Americas; and 3) identify cross-cultural encounters that have had a lasting impact on global history. This team-taught, entry-level course aims to teach historical thinking as well as historical content, to impart a basic grasp of the premodern past as well as to stimulate the development of large-scale frameworks for historical analysis. Although this course has no prerequisites and assumes no prior knowledge of the subject, students are presumed to be capable of critical reflection upon both lectures and readings.

Professor and TA information.

Prof. A. Frazier                                               Prof. C. Talbot                                      Hadi Hosainy, TA
akfrazier@mail.utexas.edu
                        ctalbot@mail.utexas.edu                         hadi.hoss@gmail.com
Office: GAR 2.148                                     Office: GAR 3.106                                    Office: Burdine 310
Hrs: T 3-5pm & by apptmt.                        Hrs: M 11-12 & F 1:30-3:30                        Hrs. W 2-4 pm

Readings. Available for purchase (p) at the Co-op or for download from Blackboard (bb):

Strayer, Ways of the World, A Brief Global History with Sources volume I (p)

Anonymous, Epic of Gilgamesh, tr. D. Ferry (p)

Sima Qian, The First Emperor, tr. R. Dawson (p)

Marco Polo, Travels, tr. R. Latham (p)

Ross Dunn, The Adventures of Ibn Battuta (p)

excerpt from Jared Diamond, Collapse (bb)

excerpt from Ammianus Marcellinus, Histories (bb) e

excerpt from Epictetus, Handbook (bb)

P. A. McAnany & T. G. Negron, "Bellicose Rulers and Climatological Peril" in Questioning Collapse, ed. P. A. McAnany & Norman Yoffee (bb)

Asoka's Rock Edict XIII (bb)

Requirements. Students are expected:

*to attend all lectures
*to prepare all reading assignments thoughtfully by beginning of the week
*to respond to at least six of eight reading worksheets and submit them before class through Blackboard (by 10pm
on the required date)
*to participate regularly and responsibly in worksheet-based discussions
*to complete at least six of the eight short factual quizzes
*to complete the three non-cumulative exams

Grading procedure. The three non-cumulative exams will consist of both short answer and essay questions, and will together comprise 60% of the course grade. Eight short, factual, multiple-choice quizzes based on the assigned textbook readings will be administered on Mondays – six of these will count toward the course grade. A series of eight reading worksheets will accompany our non-textbook sources; six will count towards the course grade. Attendance and participation is another component of your final grade. The various aspects of student performance are weighted:

exam 1 (Sept. 24)                                  = 20%
exam 2 (Oct. 22)                                    = 20%
exam 3 (Dec. 8)                                     = 20% (during final exam period)
6 quizzes                                               = 15% (cannot be made up)
6 reading worksheets                              = 20% (must be turned in before class)
attendance & participation                        = 5%

We will NOT be using pluses and minuses for the course grade this semester.

Attendance policy. You are counted present only if you are in class for the entire period. Emergencies will of course be accommodated, but departures immediately following a quiz reflect poorly upon you.

You are allowed two absences no questions asked. After that, unexcused absences will adversely affect your grade. Excused absences require a note to the professors ahead of time insofar as possible. For unexpected absences due to illness or accident, notify us of your situation as soon as possible and document it immediately upon your return.

Quizzes and reading worksheets cannot be made up. Make-up exams will be administered only with the consent of the professors and at their convenience.

Religious holy days sometimes conflict with class and examination schedules. It is the policy of UT-Austin that you must notify each of your instructors at least fourteen days prior to the classes scheduled on dates you will be absent to observe a religious holy day.

Policy on special accommodations. At the beginning of the semester, students who need special accommodations should notify the instructor by presenting a letter prepared by the Services for Students with Disabilities (SDD) Office. To ensure that the most appropriate accommodations can be provided, students should contact the SSD Office at 471-6259 or 471-4641 TTY.

Read more at:            http://www.utexas.edu/diversity/ddce/ssd/

Academic integrity. Students who violate University rules on scholastic dishonesty are subject to disciplinary penalties, including the possibility of failure in the course and/or dismissal from the University. Since such dishonesty harms the individual, all students, and the integrity of the University, policies on scholastic dishonesty will be strictly enforced.

Read details at:            http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs/scholdis.php

Blackboard and laptop/messaging device policy. We will use the course web site on Blackboard to post assignments and make announcements relating to the course – check the site regularly (at least weekly) for new information. It is your responsibility to maintain a functioning email account linked to Blackboard.

Read university policy at: http://www.utexas.edu/its/policies/emailnotify/html

All students have the right to learn in a supportive environment: don’t let your use of a laptop or mobile device distract others. All laptops and mobile messaging devices must be turned off and stored away during quizzes and examinations. Their use, WITHOUT ANY SOUND, is acceptable during lectures or class discussions for note-taking or instructor-directed web- surfing.

To record audio or visuals of lectures you must have a written consent from both professors.

Keep in touch! If you are having difficulty with the course or must be absent for a period due to personal issues, stop by during office hours or be in touch by email. Don’t wait until weeks have passed and it’s too late to catch up. The professors and TA for this course sincerely want you to succeed.

*****************************************************

Schedule of Class Meetings & Readings

 

PART I -- Taking A Global View: Civilization & Its Consequences

 

Wk 1. INTRODUCTION

W 25 Aug            Introduction to Course

F 27 Aug            Maps & Mapping

reading: Strayer, Ways, Ch1. “First Peoples, To 10,000 BCE.”

 

Wk 2. AGRICULTURE & ITS IMPACTS

M 30 Aug quiz 1 (on Strayer ch. 2); Paleolithic Art

W 1 Sept. Agricultural Transitions

F 3 Sept. Food Production & the Fertile Crescent

reading: Strayer, Ways, Ch2. “First Farmers, 10,000 BCE-3000 BCE.”

 

Wk 3. THE FIRST CIVILIZATIONS

M 6 Sept. Labor Day Holiday

W 8 Sept. The Urban Revolution in Mesopotamia

F 10 Sept. Other River Valley Civilizations

reading: begin Epic of Gilgamesh; Strayer, Ways, Ch3. “First Civilizations, 3500 BCE-500 BCE.”

 

Wk 4. VARYING TRAJECTORIES OF DEVELOPMENT

M 13 Sept. quiz 2 (Strayer ch. 3 & 7); Ruling, Writing, and Gilgamesh

                        reading worksheet 1 due 10 pm, Tues. Sept. 14

W 15 Sept. discussion: Defining Civilization with Gilgamesh

F 17 Sept. Mesoamerica & the Classical Maya

reading: finish Epic of Gilgamesh; Strayer, Ways, Ch7. “Classical Era Variations: Africa & Americas.”

 

Wk 5. SUMMING UP: GLOBAL PATTERNS IN EARLY HISTORY

M 20 Sept. Sub-Saharan Africa & the Bantu Migrations

            reading worksheet 2 due 10 pm, Tues. Sept. 21

W 22 Sept. discussion: Considering Civilizational Collapse

F 24 Sept. EXAM 1

reading: Jared Diamond, "Prologue" (pp. 1-23) & "The Maya Collapses" (pp. 157-77) in Collapse: How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed (bb); P. A. McAnany & T. G. Negron, "Bellicose Rulers and Climatological Peril" in Questioning Collapse, ed. P. A. McAnany & Norman Yoffee (bb).

 

PART II -- Comparative History: Classical Cultures, 500 BCE to 500 CE

 

Wk 6. RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY IN THE AXIAL AGE

M 27 Sept. quiz 3 (Strayer ch. 5); Buddha and Confucius

W 29 Sept. Moses, Socrates, Jesus

            reading worksheet 3 due 10 pm, Thurs. Sept. 30

F 1 Oct. discussion: Axial Age Religions

reading: Strayer, Ways, Ch5. “Eurasian Cultural Traditions, 500 BCE-500 CE.” Epictetus, selection from Handbook (bb)

 

Wk 7. POLITICS OF EMPIRE IN ASIA

M 4 Oct. quiz 4 (Strayer ch. 4); First Emperor & His Han Successors

W 6 Oct. Asoka’s Empire and Message of Dharma

            reading worksheet 4 due 10 pm, Thurs. Oct. 7

F 8 Oct. discussion: The Chinese Imperial Tradition Begins

reading: Strayer, Ways, Ch4. “Eurasian Empires, 500 BCE-500 CE;” Asoka's Rock

Edict XIII; Sima Qian, First Emperor, pp. xxii-xxxiv, 23-52 & 61-94.

 

Wk. 8. POLITICS OF EMPIRE IN THE WEST

M 11 Oct. quiz 5 (Strayer ch. 6); Rome & Its Imperial Predecessors

W 13 Oct. Fall of the Roman Empire

            reading worksheet 5 due 10 pm, Thurs. Oct. 14

F 15 Oct. discussion: Barbarians at the Gates

reading: Strayer, Ways, Ch6. “Eurasian Social Hierarchies, 500 BCE-500 CE;” Ammianus Marcellinus selection (bb)

 

Wk 9. SUMMING UP CLASSICAL EMPIRES AND CULTURES

M 18 Oct. Comparing Empires: Han & Roman

W 20 Oct. Comparing Religions in Late Antiquity

F 22 Oct. EXAM 2

 

PART III -- Cross-Cultural History: Spread of Civilizations, 500-1500

 

Wk 10. EXPANDING ECONOMIC & CULTURAL SPHERES

M 25 Oct. Silk, Sea, and Sand Roads: An Overview

W 27 Oct. Sinification of Central & East Asia

F 29 Oct. film: “Islam: Empire of Faith, Pt. 1: The Messenger”

reading: Strayer, Ways, Ch8. “Commerce and Culture, 500-1500;”

Strayer, Ways, Ch9. “China & World: East Asian Connections.”

 

Wk 11. SPREAD OF ISLAM & CHRISTIANITY

M 1 Nov. quiz 6 (Strayer ch. 10 & 11); Islamic Spain

W 3 Nov. Perspectives on the Crusades

            reading worksheet 6 due 10 pm Thurs. Nov. 4

F 5 Nov. discussion: Marco Polo and the Literature of Travel

reading: Strayer, Ways, Ch10. “Worlds of European Christendom, 500-1300;” Strayer, Ways, Ch11. “Worlds of Islam: Afro-Eurasia, 600-1500;” Marco Polo, Travels, “Prologue” (pp. 33-45)

 

Wk 12. TRAVEL IN THE MONGOL WORLD: MARCO POLO

M 8 Nov. quiz 7 (Strayer ch. 12); Genghis Khan & the Mongol Empire

W 10 Nov. Marco Polo and the Pax Mongolica

            reading worksheet 7 due 10 pm, Thurs. Nov. 11

F 12 Nov. discussion: Marco Polo and Trade Diasporas

reading: Strayer, Ways, Ch12. “Pastoral Peoples ... Mongol Moment, 1200-1500.”

Marco Polo, Travels,"Kubilai Khan" (pp. 113-62)


Wk 13.
TRAVEL IN THE ISLAMIC WORLD: IBN BATTUTA

M 15 Nov. Islam in the Eastern World

W 17 Nov. Cultures in Contact in Africa

            reading worksheet 8 due 10 pm, Thurs. Nov. 18

F 19 Nov. discussion: Ibn Battuta and the Traveller’s Gaze

reading: Dunn, Ibn Battuta, pp. 1-12,183-212 (optional: 213-40), 290-320.

 

Wk 14. THE FIFTEENTH CENTURY

M 22 Nov. quiz 8 (Strayer ch. 13); Renaissance in Europe

W 24 Nov. Rise of the Ottoman Empire

F 26 Nov. Thanksgiving Holiday

reading: Strayer, Ways, Ch13. “The Worlds of the Fifteenth Century.”

 

Wk 15. SUMMING UP: CROSS-CULTURAL ENCOUNTERS, 500-1500

M 29 Nov. Global Connections

W 1 Dec. Review worksheet & discussion

F 3 Dec. NO CLASS MEETING, Professors hold extra office hours

 

EXAM 3 on Wed. December 8, 2:00-5:00 pm

This course contains a Global Cultures flag.

HIS 309K • West Civ In Medvl Times-Pl II

39020 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm GAR 0.132
show description

This course will introduce students to the history and culture of the Middle Ages, a period extending from roughly 400-1500 A.D./C.E.  

HIS 301F • The Premodern World

39545-39560 • Fall 2009
Meets MW 1000-1100 GAR 0.102
show description

PREMODERN WORLD Fall 2009

HIS 301f (#39545, 39550, 39555, 39560)  AHC 310 (#32480, 32485, 32490, 32495)
Meets: M/W in GAR 0.102
           F in sections: GSB 2.122 / SZB 370 / CBA 4.348 / GAR 1.126
           F Exam days in GAR 0.102 (25 Sept / 23 Oct / 4 Dec )

Description:

“Premodern World” is a lower-division, team-taught, lecture course that provides an overview of global development from roughly 30,000 BCE to 1500 CE. Monday and Wednesday lectures introduce the main political, social, and cultural trends in a variety of societies while at the same time stressing the global perspective. Friday discussion sections allow students to explore primary source material and controversial interpretations. By the end of the semester, students should be able to: 1.) define “civilization” and explain theories about the rise and fall of civilizations; 2.) compare political, cultural, and socio-economic aspects of premodern societies across Eurasia, Africa, and the Americas; and 3) identify cross-cultural encounters that have had a lasting impact on global history. This entry-level course aims to teach historical thinking as well as historical content, to impart a basic grasp of the premodern past as well as to stimulate the development of large-scale frameworks for historical analysis. No prerequisites.

Professor and TA information
Prof. A. Frazier                       Prof. C. Talbot
akfrazier@mail.utexas.edu      ctalbot@mail.utexas.edu
Office: GAR 2.148                    Office: GAR 3.106
Hrs: W 3-5 pm & by appt.      Hrs: M 1-3 pm & by appt.

TA: Mikiya Koyagi                  TA: Libby Nutting
kmikiya@mail.utexas.edu     libby.nutting@mail.utexas.edu
Office: Burdine 416              Office: Burdine 412
Hrs: TH 12:30-2:30 pm          Hrs: TH 11-1 pm

Libby Nutting will be teaching the Friday 10 am section in GSB 2.122 (HIS 39545/ AHC 32480) & the Friday 11 am section in GAR 1.126 (HIS 39560/ AHC 32495). Mikiya Koyagi will be teaching the Friday 10 am section in SZB 370 (HIS 39550/ AHC 32485) & the Friday 11 am section in CBA 4.348 (HIS 39555/ AHC 32490).

Readings. Available for purchase (p) at the Coop or for download from Blackboard (bb):
Strayer, Ways of the World volume I (p)
Anonymous, Epic of Gilgamesh, tr. D. Ferry (p)
Sima Qian, The First Emperor, tr. R. Dawson (p)
Weatherford, Genghis Khan and the Making of the Modern World (p)
excerpt from Jared Diamond, Collapse(bb)
excerpt from Edicts of Asoka (bb)
excerpt from Stanley M. Burstein, Reign of Cleopatra (bb)
excerpt from Travels of Ibn Jubayr, tr. R. J. C. Broadhurst (bb)
excerpt from Book of Margery Kempe, tr. B. A. Windeatt (bb)

Requirements
Students are expected:

*to attend all lectures and discussion sections
*to prepare all reading assignments thoughtfully and on time
*to participate regularly and responsibly in section discussions
*to complete the three non-cumulative exams and six reading quizzes.

Grading procedure

The three non-cumulative exams will consist of both short answer and essay questions, and will together comprise 75% of the course grade. (We will not have an examination during finals week.) Seven short quizzes based on the assigned readings will be administered during the Friday sections – five of these will count toward the course grade. Attendance and participation is another component. The various aspects of student performance will be weighted as follows in determining the final grade:

exam 1 (Sept. 25) = 20%
exam 2 (Oct. 23) = 25%
exam 3 (Dec. 4) = 30%
five quizzes = 20%
attendance & participation = 5%

We will NOT be using pluses and minuses for the course grade this semester.

Policy on absences.

Please be aware that more than two unexcused absences will adversely affect your grade. Excused absences require a note to the professors ahead of time insofar as possible. For unexpected absences due to illness or accident, notify us of your situation as soon as possible and document it immediately upon your return. In cases of swine flu, please follow University guidelines on staying home or in isolation.

Religious holy days sometimes conflict with class and examination schedules. It is the policy of UT-Austin that you must notify each of your instructors at least fourteen days prior to the classes scheduled on dates you will be absent to observe a religious holy day.

Students must take quizzes and examinations on the specified dates. Because quizzes aim to prepare discussion in sections, we are extremely reluctant to give make-up quizzes. Make-up exams will be administered /only/ with the consent of the professors and at their convenience.

Policy on special accommodations. At the beginning of the semester, students who need special accommodations should notify the instructor by presenting a letter prepared by the Services for Students with Disabilities (SDD) Office. To ensure that the most appropriate accommodations can be provided, students should contact the SSD Office at 471-6259 or 471-4641 TTY.

Read more at: http://www.utexas.edu/diversity/ddce/ssd/

Academic integrity. Students who violate University rules on scholastic dishonesty are subject to disciplinary penalties, including the possibility of failure in the course and/or dismissal from the University. Since such dishonesty harms the individual, all students, and the integrity of the University, policies on scholastic dishonesty will be strictly enforced.

Read details at: http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs/scholdis.php

Blackboard and laptop/messaging device policy. We will use the course web site on Blackboard to post assignments and make announcements relating to the course – please check the site regularly (at least weekly) for new information. We will occasionally send out emails as well, so make sure that you have a functioning email account linked to Blackboard.

Read university policy at: http://www.utexas.edu/its/policies/emailnotify/html

All laptops and mobile messaging devices must be turned off and stored away during
quizzes and examinations
. Their use, WITHOUT ANY SOUND, is acceptable during lectures or class discussions for note-taking or instructor-directed web-surfing. All students have a right to learn in a supportive environment: please don’t let your use of a laptop or mobile device be a distraction to fellow students.

Keep in touch! If you are having difficulty with the course or are absent for a period due to personal issues, stop by during office hours or be in touch by email. Don’t wait until weeks have passed and it’s too late to catch up. The professors and TAs for this course sincerely want you to succeed.

************************************************************************

Schedule of Class Meetings & Readings

PART I -- Taking A Global View: Civilization & Its Consequences



Wk 1.  INTRODUCTION

W 26 Aug Introduction to Course

F 28 Aug Sections: Introduction to Sections, video "Guns, Germs, and Steel"

Wk 2.  AGRICULTURE & ITS IMPACTS

M 31 Aug Transitions to Agriculture

W 2 Sept. The "Urban Revolution"

F 4 Sept. Sections: continue video "Guns, Germs, and Steel: Out of Eden"

reading: begin Epic of Gilgamesh;
Strayer, Ways, Ch1. “First Peoples, To 10,000 BCE”;
Strayer, Ways, Ch2. “First Farmers, 10,000 BCE-3000 BCE.”

Wk 3. EARLY CIVILIZATION IN MESOPOTAMIA

M 7 Sept. Labor Day Holiday

W 9 Sept. Ruling, Writing, and Gilgamesh

F 11 Sept. Discussion: Gilgamesh Epic

reading: complete Epic of Gilgamesh;
Strayer, Ways, Ch3. “First Civilizations, 3500 BCE-500 BCE.”

Wk 4. DIFFERING TRAJECTORIES OF DEVELOPMENT

M 14 Sept. Mesoamerica & the Collapse of the Classical Maya

W 16 Sept. Sub-Saharan Africa & the Bantu Migrations

F 18 Sept. Discussion: Environment & Development

reading: Jared Diamond, "Prologue" (pp. 1-23) & "The Maya Collapses"
(pp. 157-77) in Collapse: How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed (bb);
Strayer, Ways, Ch7. “Classical Era Variations: Africa & Americas.”

Wk 5.  SUMMING UP EARLY CIVILIZATIONS

M 21 Sept. Other Early River Valley Civilizations

W 23 Sept. Catch up & exam review**

F 25 Sept. Exam 1 at 10 am  NO SECTIONS

PART II -- Comparative History: Classical Cultures, 500 BCE to 500 CE

Wk 6. RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY IN THE AXIAL AGE

M 28 Sept. Moses, Socrates, Jesus

W 30 Sept. Buddha & Confucius

F 2 Oct. Sections: exam 1 returned

reading: Strayer, Ways, Ch5. “Eurasian Cultural Traditions, 500 BCE-500 CE.”

Wk 7.  POLITICS OF EMPIRE IN ASIA

M 5 Oct. First Emperor & His Han Successors

W 7 Oct. Asoka’s Empire & Message of Dharma

F 9 Oct. Discussion: First Emperor

reading: Strayer, Ways, Ch4. “Eurasian Empires, 500 BCE-500 CE”;
Sima Qian, First Emperor, pp. xxii-xxxiv, 1-22, 53-59, 61-102; Asokan Edict (bb).

Wk. 8. POLITICS OF EMPIRE IN THE WEST


M 12 Oct. Politics of Empire: Persia & Greece

W 14 Oct. Cleopatra: Rome and Egypt

F 16 Oct. Discussion: Cleopatra

reading: Strayer, Ways, Ch6. “Eurasian Social Hierarchies, 500 BCE-500 CE”;
Stanley M. Burstein, The Reign of Cleopatra, pp. 105-32, 143-51, 153-54 (bb).

Wk 9. SUMMING UP CLASSICAL EMPIRES & CULTURES


M 19 Oct. Comparing Empires: Han & Rome

W 21 Oct. Comparing Religions in Late Antiquity

F 23 Oct. exam 2 at 10 am  NO SECTIONS

PART III -- Cross-Cultural History: Spread of Civilizations, 500-1500



Wk 10. EXPANDING ECONOMIC & CULTURAL SPHERES

M 26 Oct. Goods in Transit

W 28 Oct. Sinification of Central & East Asia

F 30 Oct. Sections: exam 2 returned

reading: Strayer, Ways, Ch8. “Commerce and Culture, 500-1500”;
Strayer, Ways, Ch9. “China & World: East Asian Connections.”

Wk 11. SPREAD OF ISLAM & CHRISTIANITY


M 2 Nov. Formation of Dar al-Islam

W 4 Nov. Pilgrimage

F 6 Nov. Discussion: Literature of Pilgrimage & Travel

reading: Travels of Ibn Jubayr, pp. 105-21, 127-57 (bb);
Book of Margery Kempe, pp. 34-45, 62-65, 76-81, 99-116 (bb);
Strayer, Ways, Ch10. “Worlds of European Christendom, 500-1300”;
Strayer, Ways, Ch11. “Worlds of Islam: Afro-Eurasia, 600-1500.”

Wk 12. GENGHIS KHAN & THE MONGOLS

M 9 Nov. Genghis Khan & His World

W 11 Nov. Mongol Empires

F 13 Nov. Discussion: "Barbarian" Civilization?

reading: Weatherford, Genghis Khan, pts. 1 & 2
Strayer, Ways, Ch12. “Pastoral Peoples ... Mongol Moment, 1200-1500.”

Wk 13.  EURASIA INTERCONNECTED

M 16 Nov. Mongols in China & the Pax Mongolica

W 18 Nov. Black Death

F 20 Nov. Discussion: Assessing the Mongol Legacy

reading: Weatherford, Genghis Khan, pt. 3.

Wk 14.  THE FIFTEENTH CENTURY

M 23 Nov. Italian Perspectives on the World

W 25 Nov. movie (to be announced)

F 27 Nov. Thanksgiving Holiday

reading_ Strayer, Ways, Ch13. “The Worlds of the Fifteenth Century”

Wk 15.  SUMMING UP: CROSS-CULTURAL ENCOUNTERS, 500-1500

M 30 Nov. Maritime Revolution

W 2 Dec. Catch up & Exam Review

F 4 Dec. exam 3 NO SECTIONS

HIS 350L • Machiavelli

40030 • Fall 2009
Meets M 300pm-600pm GAR 0.120
(also listed as R S 357 )
show description

Lectures, discussion, reading, and research on selected topics in the field of history.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Designed for History majors. 

History 350L and 350R may not both be counted unless the topics vary.

Course carries Writing flag. 

HIS 350L • Saints Francis And Clare-W

39160 • Spring 2009
Meets M 300pm-600pm GAR 2.128
(also listed as R S 357, WGS 345 )
show description

Lectures, discussion, reading, and research on selected topics in the field of history.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Designed for History majors. 

History 350L and 350R may not both be counted unless the topics vary.

Course carries Writing flag. 

HIS 397L • Saints' Lives As Hist Sources

39480 • Spring 2009
Meets W 500pm-800pm PAR 8C
(also listed as MDV 392M, R S 383, WGS 393 )
show description

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of the graduate adviser.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

 

Publications

Books & Articles

  • A Layman’s Life of St. Augustine: Patronage and Polemic” with edited text and appendix. Traditio 65 (2010): 231-86.
  • Possible Lives:  Authors and Saints in Renaissance Italy.  New York:  Columbia University Press, 2005.
    Winner of the 2006 Gordon Prize from the Renaissance Society of America for the best book in Renaissance Studies.
  • “Luca della Robbia’s Narrative on the Deaths of Boscoli and Capponi.”  In The Art of Executing Well:  Rituals of Execution in Renaissance Italy, edited by N. Terpstra.  Kirksville, MO:  Truman State University Press, 2008.
  • “Machiavelli, Trauma, and the Scandal of The Prince:  An Essay in Speculative History.”  In History in the Comic Mode:  Medieval Communities and the Matter of Person, edited by R. Fulton and B. Holsinger.  New York:  Columbia University Press, 2007.
  • “The First Instructions on Writing about Saints:  Aurelio Brandolini (c.1454-97) and Raffaele Maffei (1455-1522).” Memoirs of the American Academy in Rome 48 (2003).
  • “Katherine’s Place in a Renaissance Collection:  Evidence from Antonio degli Agli (c. 1400-1477), De vitis et gestis sanctorum.”  In St. Katherine of Alexandria.  Texts and Contexts in Western Medieval Europe, edited by Jacqueline Jenkins and Katherine Lewis.  Brepols:  Turnhout, 2003.

Forthcoming:

  • “Biography as an Ethical Genre” in D.A. Lines and S. Ebbersmeyer, eds., Rethinking Virtue, Reforming Society: New Directions in Renaissance Ethics (Turnhout: Brepols, forthcoming 2012).
  • “Who Wrote the First Life of Lorenzo de’ Medici?” in M. Isräels and L. Waldman, eds.,Renaissance Studies in Honor of Joseph Connors (Florence: Olschki, forthcoming 2012).
  • “Les Augustins patrons d’un humaniste laïc? Le cas de Giovanni Garzoni de Bologne” in C. Caby and R.M. Dessi, eds., Les Humanistes et l’Eglise. Pratiques culturelles et échanges entre les litterati laïcs et ecclésiastiques (Italie, début XIIIe-début XVIe siècle). Paris/Nice: CNRS, forthcoming. 
  • “Humanist Lives of St. Catherine of Siena” in J. Hamburger and G. Signori, eds.,  Catherine of Siena: The Creation of a Cult (Medieval Women: Texts and Contexts) (Turnhout: Brepols, forthcoming 2012)

        




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