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Christine L. Williams, Chair CLA 3.306, Mailcode A1700, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-232-6300

Debra J. Umberson

Ph.D., Vanderbilt University

Professor
Debra J. Umberson

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Biography

Debra Umberson is Centennial Professor in Liberal Arts and Professor of Sociology at the University of Texas at Austin. She is also affiliated with the Center for Women’s and Gender Studies and the Population Research Center. She received her PhD in sociology from Vanderbilt University in 1985 and was a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Michigan’s Institute for Social Research from 1985-88. Her research focuses on relationships and health across the life course with a particular emphasis on intimate relationships and family ties and the blending of quantitative and qualitative research methods. Recent articles have focused on marital transitions and body weight; stress and health behavior; gender and health habit processes in gay, lesbian, and straight couples; and health policy addressing the link between social ties and health. She has been the recipient of a National Research Service Award and a FIRST Award from the National Institute on Aging. Dr. Umberson is also an elected Fellow of the Gerontological Society of America. Her current research, supported by a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Investigator in Health Policy Research Award and the National Institute on Aging, examines how marital relationships affect health-related behavior and health care, and how those processes vary across gay, lesbian, and heterosexual unions. She is the immediate past editor of the Journal of Health and Social Behavior and incoming Chair of the American Sociological Association's Section on Sociology of the Family.

Dr. Umberson is currently conducting research on marriage and health in Boston, MA. The Massachusetts Health and Relationships Project (MassHARP) aims to better understand how the dynamics of marriage impact health in various areas, including health behaviors at home, how spouses care for one another during illness and injury, and how health care providers involve spouses in one another’s health care. More information about this study is available at: http://sites.la.utexas.edu/ mharp/

NIH Biosketch

Interests

Gender, Relationships, Same-Sex Couples, Mental Health, Health Behavior, Social Determinants of Health, Stress

SOC 383K • Marriage/Health-Gender Context

46345 • Fall 2014
Meets W 1200pm-300pm CLA 3.106
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Description:

This course offers a broad multidisciplinary overview that introduces students to the study of health and society. Basic topics include health patterns, health behavior, medical care, and health policy in social, demographic, cultural, economic, political, and ethical contexts. Basic methodological approaches to studying these topics will be covered. This course will include guest lectures by representatives from various disciplines including economics, advertising and communications, public health and health promotion, 1, sociology, and demography. For those students interested in the new College of Liberal Arts major in Health and Society (HS), SOC308S will count as the Introduction to Health & Society course that is required for the HS major.

Grading and Reqirements:

There will be three exams and one essay assignment for this course. Exams will be comprised of multiple choice, short answer, and short essay questions.

 

SOC 397D • Publishing Papers In Sociology

46690 • Spring 2014
Meets W 1200pm-300pm CLA 1.302A
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COURSE DESCRIPTION:

This course is designed for graduate students with an interest in publishing and reviewing research in peer-reviewed sociology journals. This course addresses: (1) how to write and publish an article in an academic journal, (2) the review process and instruction on how to review articles for scholarly journals, and (3) special topics related to the editorial process.

 

SOC 308 • Intro To Health And Society

46090 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm CLA 0.130
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Description

This course offers a broad multidisciplinary overview that introduces students to the study of health and society. Basic topics include health patterns, health behavior, medical care, and health policy in social, demographic, cultural, economic, political, and ethical contexts. Basic methodological approaches to studying these topics will be covered. This course will include guest lectures by representatives of various disciplines. This course is a requirement for the new college of liberal arts major in Health and Society (HS) which is scheduled to launch in fall, 2014.

Required Texts

Conrad, Peter. 2009. The Sociology of Health and Illness: Critical Perspectives. 8th edition. NY: Worth Publishers.

Skloot, Rebecca. The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks. NY: Crown, 2010.

Grading Policy

  1. Three in-class exams. Format will include multiple choice questions and short answer or essay questions. Each exam is worth 100 points.
  2. Essay assignment. Five page, double-spaced essay to address the question: “What is the cause of obesity in America: Society or man?” Students will view the movie SuperSize Me and read three related articles that represent an alternate point of view. The essay will summarize and compare these viewpoints in addressing the key question. Essay is worth 100 points.

(Each exam, essay, and final grade: 90-100, A; 80-89, B; 70-79, C; 60-69, D; 59 or below, F. Plus/minus system used.)

 

SOC 397D • Publishing Papers In Sociology

46025 • Spring 2013
Meets W 1200pm-300pm CLA 1.302F
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Special Emphasis:

JHSB Graduate Student Editorial Board

Publishing & reviewing on sociology of health and illness

COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course is designed for graduate students with an interest in publishing and reviewing research in the area of sociology of health and illness. This course addresses: (1) how to write and publish an article in an academic journal, (2) the review process and instruction on how to review articles for scholarly journals, and (3) special topics related to the editorial process.

Goals:

  1. Deepen substantive expertise with immersion in the most recent cutting edge research in medical sociology.
  2. Engage in critical and constructive discussion of the field of medical sociology.
  3. Develop skills and knowledge to facilitate the successful submission of a research article for editorial review and publication. Learn what reviewers are looking for in a research article.
  4. Develop skills that qualify you to evaluate and review articles for scholarly journals.  
  5. Learn about the editorial process involved in publishing research articles in Journal of Health & Social Behavior (JHSB).
  6. Prepare your own paper for editorial review. This will include the opportunity to have the student editorial board review your paper and discuss the paper in class.

 

This course may be taken for a grade, pass/fail, or by audit. Please contact the instructor if you would like to have additional information: umberson@prc.utexas.edu

 

SOC 397D • Publishing Papers In Sociology

46380 • Spring 2011
Meets W 1200pm-300pm MAI 1704
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SOC 397D • Publishing Papers in Sociology (unique #46380)

 

Special Emphasis:

JHSB Graduate Student Editorial Board

Publishing & reviewing on sociology of health and illness

 

Professor Debra Umberson

Wednesdays 12-2:30, Main Building 1703
Office hours: Wednesdays 2:30-3:30



COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course is designed for graduate students with an interest in publishing and reviewing research in the area of sociology of health and illness. This course addresses: (1) how to write and publish an article in an academic journal, (2) the review process and instruction on how to review articles for scholarly journals, and (3) special topics related to the editorial process.

 

Goals:

  1. Deepen substantive expertise with immersion in the most recent cutting edge research in medical sociology.
  2. Engage in critical and constructive discussion of the field of medical sociology.
  3. Develop skills and knowledge to facilitate the successful submission of a research article for editorial review and publication. Learn what reviewers are looking for in a research article.
  4. Develop skills that qualify you to evaluate and review articles for scholarly journals.  
  5. Learn about the editorial process involved in publishing research articles in Journal of Health & Social Behavior (JHSB).
  6. Help to shape and improve JHSB as a print and online mechanism for disseminating cutting edge research on the sociology of health.

 

This course may be taken for a grade, pass/fail, or by audit. Please contact the instructor if you would like to have additional information: umberson@prc.utexas.edu

 


MISSION STATEMENT OF JHSB

The Journal of Health and Social Behavior is a medical sociology journal that publishes empirical and theoretical articles that apply sociological concepts and methods to the understanding of health and illness and the organization of medicine and health care. Its editorial policy favors manuscripts that are grounded in important theoretical issues in medical sociology or the sociology of mental health and that advance our theoretical understanding of the processes by which social factors and human health are interrelated.

JHSB GRAD STUDENT EDITORIAL BOARD

Individual Editorial Assignments

  • Web/Pod Editor
  • Podcast Editor
  • Graphics Editor
  • Policy Brief Editor
  • Social Media Editor
  • Abstracts Editor
  • Teaching Contents Editor
  • Copy Editor
  • Editor In Chief

 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

Final grades will be based on:

  • Weekly participation and journal development: 25%
  • Editorial reviews: 25%
  • Research paper: 50%

 

Weekly participation and journal development:

  • Journal development. Share responsibility for one of JHSB’s major online or print areas, such as development of policy briefs, abstracting, graphics and images, teaching resources, web development, media coverage, development of social media, strategizing for reduced review time and increasing journal visibility and impact. 
  • Participate in weekly editorial board meetings. Participate in editorial discussions and observe decision-making and revision processes.

Editorial reviews:

  • Prepare reviews of article submissions to supplement those of experts in the field. Students should expect to review 4 to 5 articles over the course the semester (approximately one article every two to three weeks).

Prepare a research paper for editorial review:

  • Prepare your own paper for editorial review. This can be a new paper or a paper that has already been reviewed by a journal. The goal is to revise your paper, submit it for publication, and to have your article accepted for publication. The course is designed to demystify the review process and convey the ingredients for success in publishing your work. You will be benefit from editorial review (by your classmates) and concrete suggestions for revising your paper.

 

FRIENDLY REMINDERS

  • Deadlines. The course functions as both an academic seminar and as a working editorial board. We will often be working under tight deadline pressure and we will often disagree about the appropriate course of action.
  • Confidentiality. What happens in seminar, stays in seminar -- students must keep authors’ names, reviewers’ names and other identifying information strictly confidential.
  • Grading. You will be evaluated on the basis of your overall contributions to the seminar and to JHSB. You may take the course on a pass/fail or letter-grade basis.
  • Attendance. You are expected to attend each weekly meeting. 

SOC 397D • Publishing Papers in Sociology (unique #46380)

 

Special Emphasis:

JHSB Graduate Student Editorial Board

Publishing & reviewing on sociology of health and illness

 

Professor Debra Umberson

Wednesdays 12-2:30, Main Building 1703
Office hours: Wednesdays 2:30-3:30



COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course is designed for graduate students with an interest in publishing and reviewing research in the area of sociology of health and illness. This course addresses: (1) how to write and publish an article in an academic journal, (2) the review process and instruction on how to review articles for scholarly journals, and (3) special topics related to the editorial process.

 

Goals:

  1. Deepen substantive expertise with immersion in the most recent cutting edge research in medical sociology.
  2. Engage in critical and constructive discussion of the field of medical sociology.
  3. Develop skills and knowledge to facilitate the successful submission of a research article for editorial review and publication. Learn what reviewers are looking for in a research article.
  4. Develop skills that qualify you to evaluate and review articles for scholarly journals.  
  5. Learn about the editorial process involved in publishing research articles in Journal of Health & Social Behavior (JHSB).
  6. Help to shape and improve JHSB as a print and online mechanism for disseminating cutting edge research on the sociology of health.

 

This course may be taken for a grade, pass/fail, or by audit. Please contact the instructor if you would like to have additional information: umberson@prc.utexas.edu

 


MISSION STATEMENT OF JHSB

The Journal of Health and Social Behavior is a medical sociology journal that publishes empirical and theoretical articles that apply sociological concepts and methods to the understanding of health and illness and the organization of medicine and health care. Its editorial policy favors manuscripts that are grounded in important theoretical issues in medical sociology or the sociology of mental health and that advance our theoretical understanding of the processes by which social factors and human health are interrelated.

JHSB GRAD STUDENT EDITORIAL BOARD

Individual Editorial Assignments

  • Web/Pod Editor
  • Podcast Editor
  • Graphics Editor
  • Policy Brief Editor
  • Social Media Editor
  • Abstracts Editor
  • Teaching Contents Editor
  • Copy Editor
  • Editor In Chief

 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

Final grades will be based on:

  • Weekly participation and journal development: 25%
  • Editorial reviews: 25%
  • Research paper: 50%

 

Weekly participation and journal development:

  • Journal development. Share responsibility for one of JHSB’s major online or print areas, such as development of policy briefs, abstracting, graphics and images, teaching resources, web development, media coverage, development of social media, strategizing for reduced review time and increasing journal visibility and impact. 
  • Participate in weekly editorial board meetings. Participate in editorial discussions and observe decision-making and revision processes.

Editorial reviews:

  • Prepare reviews of article submissions to supplement those of experts in the field. Students should expect to review 4 to 5 articles over the course the semester (approximately one article every two to three weeks).

Prepare a research paper for editorial review:

  • Prepare your own paper for editorial review. This can be a new paper or a paper that has already been reviewed by a journal. The goal is to revise your paper, submit it for publication, and to have your article accepted for publication. The course is designed to demystify the review process and convey the ingredients for success in publishing your work. You will be benefit from editorial review (by your classmates) and concrete suggestions for revising your paper.

 

FRIENDLY REMINDERS

  • Deadlines. The course functions as both an academic seminar and as a working editorial board. We will often be working under tight deadline pressure and we will often disagree about the appropriate course of action.
  • Confidentiality. What happens in seminar, stays in seminar -- students must keep authors’ names, reviewers’ names and other identifying information strictly confidential.
  • Grading. You will be evaluated on the basis of your overall contributions to the seminar and to JHSB. You may take the course on a pass/fail or letter-grade basis.
  • Attendance. You are expected to attend each weekly meeting. 

SOC 330C • Death & Dying: Socl Perspectvs

46415 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 930-1100 UTC 4.134
show description

 See attached file

SOC 395G • Gender And Family

45920 • Spring 2009
Meets W 1200-300pm BUR 214
(also listed as WGS 393 )
show description

Course Description: 

This seminar is designed to help students understand of the nature and causes of gender stratification in industrial societies. In this seminar we examine both theoretical and empirical issues regarding gender inequality in the labor market. Topics to be discussed include changes in female labor force participation, gender segregation in the workplace, gender gaps in earnings and promotions, as well as gender differences in career processes. Because many articles we will read involve statistical analyses, students are expected to be able to read and understand quantitative sociological research at the level of SOC385L or the equivalent. While a large proportion of the readings are based on research in the United States, international comparisons of women’s economic roles also constitute an important part of this seminar. In particular, we address how social institutions that vary from one country to another shape men’s and women’s economic opportunities and thus the degree of gender inequality in the society.    Students are expected to attend class regularly and read the assigned readings prior to the class period during which we will discuss the material. Active participation in class discussions is also required. 

Texts:

The required texts for this course includes books and articles from peer-reviewed sociological journals. The list below shows some of the books required for this course:  

Goldin, Claudia. 1990. Understanding the Gender Gap: An Economic History of American Women. Oxford University Press.

Charles, Maria. and David B. Grusky. 2004. Occupational Ghetto: The Worldwide Segregation of Men and Women. Stanford University Press.

Ogasawara, Yuko. 1998. Office Ladies and Salaried Men: Power, Gender, and Work in Japanese Companies. University of California. 

Publications

Umberson, Debra, Kristi Williams and Mieke Thomeer (forthcoming). “Family status and mental health: Recent advances and future directions.” To appear in Carol S. Aneshensel and Jo C. Phelan (Eds.), Handbook of the Sociology of Mental Health.

Carr, Deborah and Debra Umberson (forthcoming). “The social psychology of stress, health, and coping.” To appear John Delamater and Amanda Ward (Eds), Handbook of Social Psychology, 2nd edition, Springer Publishing.

Thomeer, Mieke, Debra Umberson and Kristi Williams (forthcoming). “Women, stress, and health.” To appear in Marlene B. Goldman, Rebecca Troisi, and Kathryn M. Rexrode (Editors), Women and Health (2nd Edition), Elsevier Inc.

Reczek, Corinne and Debra Umberson (2012). “Gender, health behavior, and intimate relationships: Lesbian, gay, and straight contexts.” Social Science and Medicine74:1783-1790.PMCID: PMC3337964

Lodge, Amy and Debra Umberson. (2012). “All Shook Up:  Sexuality of mid to later life married couples.” Journal of Marriage and Family 74:428-443.

Umberson, Debra, Hui Liu, John Mirowsky and Corinne Reczek (2011). “Parenthood and trajectories of change in body weight over the life course.” Social Science and Medicine 73:1323-1331.PMCID: PMC3391503

Umberson, Debra and Jennifer Karas Montez (2010). “Social relationships and health: A flashpoint for public policy.” Journal of Health and Social Behavior 51: S54-S66.

Reczek, Corinne, Hui Liu and Debra Umberson (2010). “Just the two of us? How parents influence adult children’s marital quality.” Journal of Marriage and Family 72:1205-1219.

Umberson, Debra, Tetyana Pudrovska and Corinne Reczek.  (2010).  "Parenthood, Childlessness, and Well-being: A Life Course Perspective." Journal of Marriage and Family. 72(3): 612-629.

Tracie C. Harrison, Debra Umberson, Li-Chen Lin and Hsui-Rong Cheng. (2010). "Timing of Impairment and Health-Promoting Lifestyles in Women with Disabilities."  Qualitative Health Research. 20(6):816-829. 

Umberson, Debra, Robert Crosnoe and Corinne Reczek (2010). “Social ties and health behavior across the life course.”  Karen S. Cook and Douglas S. Massey (Editors),  Annual Review of Sociology 36:139-157.

Reczek, Corinne, Sinikka Elliott and Debra Umberson. (2009). “Commitment without Marriage: Union Formation of Long-term Gay and Lesbian Couples.”  Journal of Family Issues 30(6):738-756.

Umberson, Debra, Hui Liu and Daniel Powers. (2009). “Marital Status, Marital Transitions, and Body Weight.” Journal of Health and Social Behavior. 50(3): 327-43.

Liu, Hui, Sinikka Elliott and Debra Umberson. (2009) "Marriage in Young Adulthood." In J.E. Grant & M.N. Potenza (Eds.), Young Adult Mental Health. Oxford University Press.

Umberson, Debra, Hui Liu, and Corinne Reczek. (2008) "Stress and Health Behaviors." In H. Turner & S. Schiemann (Eds.), Advances in Life Course Research: Stress Processes Across the Life Course. Elsevier.

Umberson, Debra and Hui Liu. (2008). "The Times They Are a Changin': Marital Status and Health Differentials from 1972 to 2003." Journal of Health and Social Behavior. 49(3):239-253.

Umberson, Debra and Sinikka Elliott. (2008). "The Performance of Desire: Gender and Sexual Negotiation in Long-term Marriages. Journal of Marriage and Family. 70(2): 391-406.

Umberson, Debra and Corinne Reczek. (2007) "Interactive Stress and Coping around Parenting: Explaining Trajectories of Change in Intimate Relationships over the Life Course." Pp. 91-126 in T.J. Owens & J.J. Suitor (Eds.), Advances in Life Course Research: Interpersonal Relations Across the Life Course, Vol 12. Elsevier.

Umberson, Debra. Kristi Williams, Daniel Powers, Hui Liu, and Belinda Needham. (2006). "You Make Me Sick: Marital Quality and Health Over the Life Course." Journal of Health and Social Behavior, 47(March): 1-16.

Umberson, Debra and Belinda Needham. (2006). "Parenthood, Parenting, and Marital Interaction." In V. Bengtson, A. Acock, K. Allen & P. Dilworth-Anderson (Eds.), Sourcebook of Family Theory and Research. NY: Sage Publications.

Umberson, Debra. (2006). "Parents, Adult Children, and Immortality." Contexts, 5(4), 48-53.

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