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Christine L. Williams, Chair CLA 3.306, Mailcode A1700, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-232-6300

Janice R Hullum

Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin

Lecturer

Contact

  • Phone: 512-471-1533
  • Office: CLA 4.606
  • Office Hours: Thursdays 2-3 and by appointment

Biography

Previously professor of sociology at Randolph-Macon Woman's College, Lynchburg, Virginia.

SOC 340C • Globalization

46235 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm CLA 0.120
(also listed as EUS 346 )
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Description

The course will introduce the major dimensions of globalization and the main questions that the topic raises for scholars and activists.  This introduction to a broad, complex, constantly changing field should provide a foundation for continued thinking and learning about globalization. 

The writing assignments are intended to help you develop greater skill, versatility and confidence as a writer by practicing different writing strategies and techniques for requesting and receiving useful feedback on written work.  The final review essay provides an opportunity to demonstrate all that you have learned about writing and about globalization.

The assignments for the course should take an average of about six hours per week to complete.

Texts

Ritzer, George.  2007. The Globalization of Nothing.  2nd ed. Thousand Oaks, CA:  Pine Forge Press.

Eitzen, D. Stanley and Maxine Baca Zinn, eds.  2012.  Globalization:  The Transformation of  Social Worlds.  3rd ed.  Belmont, CA:  Wadsworth Cengage Learning.

Requirements and grading

Tests

Hour exam at midterm 7.5%

Second hour exam 7.5%

Informal writing

In class writing, quizzes and class participation (daily) 15%

Soliciting and giving feedback on writing (“peer reviews” when  papers are due) 15%                                                                                

Formal writing

Formal papers, including revisions (250-500 words) 35%

Final book review essay, in lieu of a final exam (1000-1250 words) 20%

 

SOC 330P • Sociology & Social Psychology

45815 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am CLA 4.106
show description

DESCRIPTION

This is a course in microsociology with an emphasis on understanding communication and interaction in everyday life. We will pay most attention to sociological perspectives that focus on symbols, their importance in the development of mind and self, and their role in the construction of social reality.  Among other issues, we will consider how symbols may be used to create, enforce, resist and change sociocultural systems of difference and disadvantage such as those often associated with race and gender.

WRITING

The focus is on developing a scholarly writing style, using the ASA Style Guide as the basic reference.  You will be asked to work on clarity, conciseness, voice, and correct format for acknowledging sources.

VIEWER DISCRETION ADVISED!

Some material may contain adult themes.  If you are not prepared to read sociological research on child molesters, flatulence and defecation, gay men or white supremacists, don't take this course.  In discussing these and other matters that may be considered inappropriate for discussion in polite society, we will seek to follow the advice attributed to Spinoza: 

                                     Do not weep.  Do not wax indignant.  Understand.

You should be prepared to consider how sociological perspectives apply to your personal identity and interactions.  Your own experience is a resource for critical thought about the concepts examined here; at the same time, you should try not to become overly sensitive or defensive about sociological handling of social arenas in which you participate.

READING

Hewitt and Shulman, Self and Society

Journal articles and excerpts from books (Course Documents on Blackboard)

REQUIREMENTS AND GRADING

 Two hour exams 15%

Daily work (quizzes, informal writing, etc.) 5%                                                                                           

Short papers 40%

(Best nine out of ten grades)                                                                   

Project 40%

            In-class presentation               5%

            Giving feedback                      5%

            First draft of report                15%

            Final version of report                        15%

Responding to feedback          Extra credit:  up to 10 points to be added to your grade on the report

 Short Papers (250-350 words)

 Each paper is based on a reserve reading assignment and is due by the beginning of class on the due date for the assigned reserve reading.  It should include: 

(1)       the main idea of one article from the assigned reading;

(2)       the basis for the main idea (i.e., the reasoning and evidence upon which the author’s conclusions rest);

(3)       the theoretical foundation (i.e., how the research is connected to a more general idea.  If a particular concept is examined, be sure to identify that concept and include a definition); and

(4)       a question that the article raises, for possible class discussion.

This is a lot of information to cover in approximately one page.  You will have to be very concise.  While the question (#4 above) may imply a weakness in the article, the short papers do not entail a critique of the article.   Nonetheless, you should think critically about the strengths and weaknesses of each article.  Discussions in class will allow ample opportunity to elaborate on ideas and criticisms that can’t be treated at length in your papers.

Note:  Criteria for evaluation of the short papers are posted under “Assignments” on the course page.

Project and Long Paper (1,000 words)

Each student, working alone or with a partner, will devise a project applying a general sociological concept to a specific aspect of everyday life. The project should take one of the studies in the reserve reading assignments as a model or point of departure and should adapt the ideas and evidence appropriately to our current time, place and social context.   Projects thus might involve, for example, analysis of song lyrics, self reflection or observations (see reading assignments on April 5, February 22 and January 25, respectively). 

You will give a preliminary presentation related to the project in class at the end of the semester.  The presentation should be organized, interesting and 10 minutes in length, including time for questions and discussion.  The final results of the project will be written up in a 1000-word paper that identifies the concept applied, the evidence used, the conclusions drawn and the limitations and implications of the project. Any conclusions you draw will be suggestive rather than definitive.  A first draft of the paper is due the last day of class.  You will receive feedback from me in time to revise the final version before the due date during the final exam period.

Students working with a partner will be expected to have a larger data base for analysis, but the finished paper will be the same format and length as for students working alone.  For example, for a project involving the symbolic analysis of song lyrics, if a student working independently should analyze 10 songs, then two students working together should analyze 20 songs.  Partners will present the project together in class but each will write an independent report.  Be thinking about whether you want to work by yourself or with a partner.  An important advantage of working with someone is that your partner provides a bit of insurance that your project can still be presented on schedule even if you get sick.

The projects should be thought of as preliminary or exploratory studies, the main purpose of which is (1) to illustrate how theory is used to formulate hypotheses and analyze data and (2) to provide a vehicle for you to write using a professional, scholarly style and tone. 

 Note:  You may not begin work on your project until your proposal is approved, to insure that your project meets ethical guidelines for social research.

ATTENDANCE AND LATENESS 

Class time is very important.  We will go over the reading and engage in discussions and tasks that apply or critique ideas and information from the reading.  The success of the class depends on prior preparation.  Also, given the assumptions of our theoretical perspective, it seems more than usually important to relate our educational approach to the substantive ideas being examined:  society is symbolic interaction, including communication, problem solving and cooperation.  The small social world of our class will model our subject matter.

The two lowest grades from your daily work will be dropped.  Absence during the final presentations will affect your grade even if your absence is unavoidable. 

Please note that you are also expected to see me at least once for an individual appointment.  This is a prerequisite for approval of your project. 

Late papers will be docked one letter grade per day after the deadline.   If you cannot come to class, you can submit a paper by email and have it counted as being on time.  If an absence is foreseeable, you can hand in your paper before it is due, and you may also arrange to take a test early under certain circumstances.  Please consult with me about this at least one week prior to the test.        

SOC 340C • Globalization

45610 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm BUR 231
(also listed as EUS 346 )
show description

Description

The course will introduce the major dimensions of globalization and the main questions that the topic raises for scholars and activists.  This introduction to a broad, complex, constantly changing field should provide a foundation for continued thinking and learning about globalization. 

The writing assignments are intended to help you develop greater skill, versatility and confidence as a writer by practicing different writing strategies and techniques for requesting and receiving useful feedback on written work.  The final review essay provides an opportunity to demonstrate all that you have learned about writing and about globalization.

The assignments for the course should take an average of about six hours per week to complete.

Texts

Ritzer, George.  2007. The Globalization of Nothing.  2nd ed. Thousand Oaks, CA:  Pine Forge Press.

Eitzen, D. Stanley and Maxine Baca Zinn, eds.  2012.  Globalization:  The Transformation of  Social Worlds.  3rd ed.  Belmont, CA:  Wadsworth Cengage Learning.

Requirements and grading

Tests

Hour exam at midterm 7.5%

Second hour exam 7.5%

Informal writing

In class writing, quizzes and class participation (daily) 15%

Soliciting and giving feedback on writing (“peer reviews” when  papers are due) 15%                                                                                

Formal writing

Formal papers, including revisions (250-500 words) 35%

Final book review essay, in lieu of a final exam (1000-1250 words) 20%

 

SOC 366 • Deviance

45647 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm NOA 1.116
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Description 

Substantively, the course is an introduction to sociological perspectives on deviance and social control.  Students will read sociological research on a variety of topics, ranging from relatively harmless social diversions to serious and possibly shocking rule violations. 

By its very nature, the study of deviance involves subject matter that some people regard as offensive.  You are not asked to give up your own ethical standards.  You are expected to:

(1) examine your own values dispassionately, as one kind of datum about your own socialization and culture; and

(2) bracket your own values while you apply sociological perspectives to understand various examples of deviance. 

Your own experience is a resource for critical thought about the concepts examined here; at the same time, you should try not to become overly sensitive or defensive about sociological handling of social arenas in which you participate.  The objective of the sociological approach is to understand social processes, not to judge.

Texts

Required

Adler and Adler, Constructions of Deviance, 7th ed.

Recommended

ASA Style Guide, 4th ed. (order from ASA online book store:  http://www.e-noah.net/asa/asashoponlineservice/ProductDetails.aspx?productID=ASAOE701S10); or

ASA Style Guide, 3rd ed. (short version available online free:  http://www.asanet.org/Quick%20Style%20Guide.pdf)

Requirements and grading:                                            

Writing Requirement:

The writing emphasis is on developing a scholarly voice and style.  The assignments are six short papers (250-300 words), each focusing on the analysis of a scholarly article, and a longer review of the literature (6-8 pagers), analyzing and organizating information on a topic of particular interest to you.

The assignments for the course should take an average of about six hours per week to complete. 

Grading:

7 short papers (omit one or drop the lowest grade)                   30%

Long paper (draft and final version)                                        30%

Presentation                                                                          5%

Feedback on classmates’ presentations                                     5%

Hour exam                                                                           20%

Daily work

(informal writing, pop quizzes feedback on short papers)   10%

Specific instructions for all papers will be posted on Blackboard. 

Grading Scale

94-100+           A

90-93               A-

87-89               B+

84-86               B

80-83               B-

etc.

SOC 330P • Sociology & Social Psychology

45595 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm BUR 231
show description

DESCRIPTION

This is a course in microsociology with an emphasis on understanding communication and interaction in everyday life. We will pay most attention to symbolic interactionism and related sociological perspectives that focus on symbols, their importance in the development of mind and self, and their role in the construction of social reality.  Among other issues, we will consider how symbols may be used to create, enforce, resist and change sociocultural systems of difference and disadvantage such as those often associated with race and gender.

 READING

There will be one textbook, supplemented by recent journal articles and excerpts from books (available under Course Documents on Blackboard)

 REQUIREMENTS AND GRADING

Two hour exams    25%

Daily work (quizzes, informal writing, etc.)     15%                                                                                        

Six short paper   20%

(Best nine out of ten grades)

 Project             40%

            In-class presentation               5%

            Giving feedback                      5%

            First draft of report                15%

            Final version of report            15%

Responding to feedback     Extra credit:  up to 10 points to be added to your grade on the report

Short Papers (250-350 words)

Each paper is based on a reserve reading assignment and is due by the beginning of class on the due date for the assigned reserve reading.  It should include: 

(1)       the main idea of one article from the assigned reading;

(2)       the basis for the main idea (i.e., the reasoning and evidence upon which the author’s conclusions rest);

(3)       the theoretical foundation (i.e., how the research is connected to a more general idea.  If a particular concept is examined, be sure to identify that concept and include a definition); and

(4)       a question that the article raises, for possible class discussion.

.Project and Long Paper (1,000 words)

Each student, working alone or with a partner, will devise a project applying a general sociological concept to a specific aspect of everyday life. The project should take one of the studies in the reserve reading assignments as a model or point of departure and should adapt the ideas and evidence appropriately to our current time, place and social context.   You will give a preliminary presentation related to the project in class at the end of the semester.  The presentation should be organized, interesting and 10 minutes in length, including time for questions and discussion.  The final results of the project will be written up in a 1000-word paper that identifies the concept applied, the evidence used, the conclusions drawn and the limitations and implications of the project. Any conclusions you draw will be suggestive rather than definitive.  A first draft of the paper is due the last day of class.  You will receive feedback from me in time to revise the final version before the due date during the final exam period.

SOC 340C • Globalization

45613 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 930am-1100am JES A216A
(also listed as EUS 346 )
show description

Description

This course is a sociological analysis of some of the interrelated aspects of globalization and an examination of the consequences of globalization for nations around the world and for groups within these nations.  Special attention will be given to the social and cultural aspects of globalization.

As a writing intensive section, the course has a dual focus:  It will emphasize substantive sociological content crucial to your understanding of the world today, and it will also emphasize the honing of writing skills that will be useful to you as a student, a professional, and a citizen.

Objectives and expectations

The course will introduce the major dimensions of globalization and the main questions that the topic raises for scholars and activists.  This introduction to a broad, complex, constantly changing field should provide a foundation for continued thinking and learning about globalization. 

The writing assignments are intended to help you develop greater skill, versatility and confidence as a writer by practicing different writing strategies and techniques for requesting and receiving useful feedback on written work.  The final review essay provides an opportunity to demonstrate all that you have learned about writing and about globalization.

The assignments for the course should take an average of about six hours per week to complete.

Texts

Required:

Ritzer, George.  2011.  The McDonaldization of Society 6. Thousand Oaks, CA:  Pine Forge Press.

Eitzen, D. Stanley and Maxine Baca Zinn, eds.  2012.  Globalization:  The Transformation of Social Worlds.  3rd ed.  Belmont, CA:  Wadsworth Cengage Learning.

Recommended resource:

ASA Style Guide, 3rd ed. available online at:  http://www.asanet.org/Quick%20Style%20Guide.pdf

 

SOC 366 • Deviance

45465 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm UTC 3.102
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Course Goals and Objectives

This course examines the nature of deviant behavior in contemporary society. This class will focus on the processes of defining an act as deviant and the selective application of the deviant stigma. Additionally, the embeddedness of society and its norms in and between our minds is a major theme woven throughout this course. My primary aim is to enable you to comprehend the social structure of your individual consciousness. You can reasonably expect to engage in considerable introspection regarding your beliefs, assumptions, prejudices, values, and goals in the following ten weeks. To this end, critical thinking is demanded of all students.

By the end of this quarter you will have gained:

1. A critical skepticism regarding social problems and their resolution. 2. An ability to specify the social mechanisms creating deviance categories. 3. A deeper knowledge of what society is, and how our beliefs reflect the major themes

of our most invisible social constructions. 4. An awareness of major patterns of individual and organizational deviance. 5. An in-depth understanding of specific types of deviance and the arguments

surrounding them.

I recognize that it can sometimes be intimidating to speak up in class. However, since the communication of ideas is the basis of society, discussion, debate, and dissent are expected in this class. You are absolutely free to argue with me or with anyone else in the class, and any fear that your grade will somehow suffer for this is ludicrous and unfounded. If you disagree with something stated in class, it is your responsibility to argue your point. To do less is to deny yourself, and possibly others, complete comprehension. Since this is a college-level course, I expect that your ideas will be well-formulated and based on a critical understanding of the topic. This class will challenge many of your beliefs about the social world. If you find yourself troubled by anything discussed in this class, it is only because you are beginning to think.

Required Texts

Thio, Alex. 2010. Deviant Behavior, 10th edition. Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon. ISBN: 0205693237. Lenson, David. 1999. On Drugs. University of Minnesota Press. ISBN: 0816627118.

Requirements and Grading Policy

Whether you are taking this course out of intellectual curiosity or to fill a requirement, your attendance and active participation is expected. Comprehension, participation, and the application of ideas rather than the relatively simple ability of regurgitating memorized terms will be emphasized. Each of the following is discussed in detail further below.

Attendance 10% Participation / Pop Quizzes 30% Midterm Examination 30% Final Examination 30%

Grading Scale: Final grades will be determined using the standard grading scale.

A 93-100 A- 90-92 B+ 87-89 B 83-86 B- 80-82 C+ 77-79

C 73-76 C- 70-72 D+ 67-69 D 63-66 D- 60-62 F below 60

Attendance/Participation: Half the responsibility for creating an engaging classroom environment lies with the students themselves. By keeping up with class material and assignments, engaging in debate, and participating in general, you help to create a more dynamic learning environment. Consequently, I take this very seriously. Irregular attendance is like reading every other page of a book, in that you would not know what was going on. In the same way, you will not be able to effectively follow the course material without attending all or at least most of the classes. Additionally, about half the material that you will be tested on will be available only through lectures. As well, active participation is taken into account when I calculate final grades. If you miss class, you will be responsible for obtaining lecture notes from someone else in the class for the day. Also, coming in late or leaving early is a terrible distraction to the rest of the class, as well as to me, and could result in lost points (see Pop Quizzes below). Please don’t be late. If you will need to leave early for some unforeseen but urgent purpose, please sit near an exit and let me know before class begins.

Pop Quizzes: Several times throughout the quarter, there will be a pop quiz either at the beginning or at the end of the class period. It will cover the broad themes of the day’s readings, as well as the previous lecture. These are to encourage you to stay on top of the course material, and will give you an idea of what kind of questions to expect from the exams.

Midterm Examination: Your attendance and attention in class as well as being on top of the readings will help you immensely in your preparation for this exam. I will prepare you adequately for what to expect.

Final Examination: This is a cumulative exam. As with the midterm, your attendance and attention in class as well as being on top of the readings will help you prepare for this exam immensely. The cumulative format will enable you to synthesize what you have learned, emphasizing the broad themes of the course. I will prepare you adequately for what to expect.

SOC 330P • Sociology & Social Psychology

46150 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm MAI 220A
show description

Description:

This is a course in microsociology with an emphasis on understanding face-to-face interaction.  Special attention is given to symbolic interactionism and related sociological perspectives that focus on humans' pervasive use of symbols, their importance in the development of mind and self, and their role in the construction of social reality.  Topics include the way symbols may be used to create, enforce, resist and change sociocultural systems of difference and disadvantage such as those often associated with race and gender. 

 

Grading:

Most of the grade will be based on ten short papers related to the reading assignments and a project and longer paper in lieu of a final exam.  The project involves applying a general sociological concept to a specific aspect of everyday life.   Previous papers based on the projects have dealt with subjects such as establishing and maintaining status in a subculture of “movie nerds”; social objects defined and used in college basketball; and analysis of the stigma of race in the cartoon series “The Boondocks.”

SOC 340C • Globalization-W

46583 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 1200-100pm WRW 113
(also listed as EUS 346 )
show description

 

Jan Hullum

Burdine 470  Office hours:  11:00-12:00 Monday and by appointment

email:  jrhullum@gmail.com

 

 

Description

 

This course is a sociological analysis of some of the interrelated aspects of globalization and an examination of the consequences of globalization for nations around the world and for groups within these nations.  Special attention will be given to the social and cultural aspects of globalization.

 

This section will use writing as a means of learning about globalization and, at the same time, will take the topic of globalization as an opportunity for you to practice and improve your writing.    Thus, the course has a dual focus:  It will emphasize substantive sociological content crucial to your understanding of the world today, and it will also emphasize the honing of writing skills that will be useful to you as a student, a professional, and a citizen.

 

 

Objectives and expectations

 

The course will introduce the major dimensions of globalization and the main questions that the topic raises for scholars and activists.  This introduction to a broad, complex, constantly changing field should leave you with a determination to continue thinking and learning about globalization. 

 

The writing assignments are intended to help you develop greater skill, versatility and confidence as a writer, by practicing different writing strategies and techniques for requesting and receiving useful feedback on written work.  The assignments progress from simple to more complex writing tasks, each subsequent assignment building on the ones before it.  The final review essay provides an opportunity to demonstrate all that you have learned about writing and about globalization.

 

The assignments for the course should take an average of about six hours per week to complete.

 

 

Texts

 

Required:

 

Ritzer, George.  2007.  The Globalization of Nothing.  2nd ed. Thousand Oaks, CA:  Pine   Forge   Press.

 

Eitzen, D. Stanley and Maxine Baca Zinn, eds.  2009.  Globalization:  The             Transformation of Social Worlds.  2nd ed.  Belmont, CA:  Wadsworth         Cengage Learning.

 

There are also assignments from The New York Times (http://www.nytimes.com/# ),

Yale Global Online Magazine (http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/), and sociological journals (available online or under “Course Documents” on Blackboard).

 

           

Recommended if you plan to continue in sociology:

 

American Sociological Association, Style Guide, 3rd. ed.

(order from the ASA at http://www.e-noah.net/asa/asashoponlinservice/ProductDetails.aspx?productID=ASAOe701S07)

 

The second edition is very similar and is available through a link on your course page or  at http://www.asanet.org/page.ww?name=Quick+Style+Guide&section=Sociology=Depts.

Requirements and grading

 

Informal writing

In class writing, quizzes and class participation                                                        15%

Soliciting and giving feedback on writing (“peer reviews”)                                        15%

 

Formal writing

Formal papers, including revisions (Length:  250-500 words)                                   35%

            (13 short papers                     25%)

            (4 revisions                             10%)

Final book review essay, in lieu of a final exam

             (Length:  1000-1250 words)                                                                          20%

 

Tests

Hour exam at midterm                                                                                                7.5%

Second hour exam                                                                                                       7.5%

 

Grading scale

 

94-100+          A

90-93               A-

87-89               B+

84-86               B

80-83               B-

etc.

 

 

 

Extra credit

 

You can boost your grade by doing optional extra credit assignments which will be announced as occasions arise during the semester. The extra credit encourages you to take advantage of local opportunities for learning about and taking action on issues related to globalization.  Assignments will have different point values depending on their scope.  Points earned will be added to your grades on the hour exams, for a maximum of 10 points on each.

 

 

Absences and lateness

 

Absences, even because of illness, do not excuse you from the formal writing assignments.   Late papers will be graded down one letter grade for each calendar day past the deadline except for the final book review essay which must be handed in on time.   If you have to miss class, you can still submit the assignment electronically by the date listed on the syllabus.  To minimize penalties for lateness, submit the paper electronically as soon as it is completed.  In either case, send it to me (jrhullum@gmail.com) as an email attachment.

 

The two lowest grades will be dropped from your average for the in-class writing and one will be dropped from your average on peer reviewing.   This allows you to miss three classes without penalty.  Much of the work of writing and revising depends on your participation and collaboration in class.   If you have an illness or emergency that forces you to miss a great many classes, you should consider dropping the course.

 

It is better to arrive late than not to arrive at all, but lateness can be disruptive and should be avoided.  If you arrive late and miss a pop quiz or in-class writing assignment, you will not be able to make it up.  Please make a special effort to arrive on time when short papers are due.  If you arrive late on a day when the class is engaged in peer reviewing, you may not be able to participate.

 

 

General guidelines

 

Complete assignments before coming to class on the dates indicated on the syllabus.    See your course page on Blackboard under “Assignments” for detailed instructions and criteria for evaluation for each paper.  Additional instructions for papers will be given in class.

 

Please contact me if there is something you don’t understand or if you’re having a problem with something in the class.

 

 

 

CALENDAR OF TOPICS AND ASSIGNMENTS: Complete the assignments BEFORE coming to class.

 

INTRODUCTION

 

Definition and short history of globalization, current examples in the news and introduction to major aspects under debate.

 

8/26     General introduction and overview of the course.

            ASA style; paraphrase compared to quotation.

 

8/28     Reading assignment:  New York Times article assigned to you.  Also look at                        Villareal and Yu, “Economic Globalization and Women's Employment:                   The Case of Manufacturing in Mexico” (see “Course Documents”) for a                     model of sociological writing.

                       

            Paper 1:  Summary and Paraphrase.  In your own words, give a brief account                of the main points in the NYT article.  Cite the source correctly. 

 

8/31     Reading assignment: Eitzen and Zinn, “Globalization” (Eitzen and Zinn,                             pp. 1-9), Giddens, “Globalisation” (Eitzen and Zinn, pp. 11-17) and

                        Singer, “Navigating the Ethics of Globalization” (Eitzen and Zinn, pp.130-             136)

 

9/2       Reading assignment:  Eitzen and Zinn, “Debating Globalization:  Introduction”                  (Eitzen and Zinn, pp. 43-44),Weidenbaum, “Globalization:  Wonder Land              or Waste Land?”, Weller and Hersh, “Free Markets and Poverty”                          (Eitzen and Zinn, pp. 51-63) and Faux, “NAFTA at 10” (Eitzen and Zinn,                         pp. 64-67.

                       

9/4       Paper 2:  Paraphrase and quotation.   One of the most important debates about                         globalization concerns its human consequences:  Are they good, or bad?                  Based on what you've read so far, what do you think?  Use information                  and ideas from at least two articles to support your answer.  Cite both                   sources correctly and include an appropriate quotation from one or both of                        them.

                       

 

DIMENSIONS OF GLOBALIZATION

 

Globalization includes interrelated but analytically distinct areas: economic, political, social, environmental and health related, and cultural dimensions.

                       

9/9       Reading assignment:  Eitzen, “Dimensions of Globalization,” Brecher,                                Costello and Smith, “Globalization and Its Specter,” and Martin “Heavy                Traffic” (Eitzen and Zinn, pp. 23-41).           

 

            Be prepared to discuss the reflection questions (Eitzen and Zinn, pp. 41-42).                    

9/11     Reading assignment:  A recent New York Times article related to globalization

 

            Paper 3:  Illustration.  How does the information in the news                                           story provide an example of a particular dimension or aspect of                               globalization?

 

The Economic Dimension

 

9/14     Reading assignment:  Eitzen and Zinn, “Economic Globalization,” The                                Dollars and Sense Collective, “The ABCs of the Global Economy,”                       Moberg, “Maytag Moves to Mexico” (Eitzen and Zinn, pp. 68-85) and

                        Stiglitz, “Making Globalization Work” (Eitzen and Zinn, pp. 106-115).

 

9/16     Reading assignment:  Gordon and Knickerbocker Designs, “The Sweat                                Behind the Shirt.”  Read Kristof, “Where Sweatshops Are a Dream”                       (http://www.nytimes.com/2009/01/15/opinion/15kristof.html?) and play                the associated video (see left menu option).  Read Malkin, “Nafta's                         Promise,Unfulfilled”

            (http://www.nytimes.com/2009/03/24/business/worldbusiness/24peso.html

 

            In class:  The “Global South” and the “Top Three”                                                  (http://money.cnn.com/magazines/fortune/global500/2009/full_list)

 

 

9/18     Paper 4:  Evidence.  What are the ten largest corporations in the world?                            How do their revenues compare with the GDPs of countries?  Does your               evidence support or contradict the claim that transnational corporations are                 comparable to nation-states in their economic power?

 

The Political Dimension

 

9/21     Reading assignment:  Eitzen and Zinn, “Political Globalization,” Stiglitz,                            “Globalism’s Discontents” (Eitzen and Zinn, pp. 117-129), Rosenberg,                  “Why Mexico’s Small Corn Farmers Go Hungry” and Fox, “Binational                        Citizens” (Eitzen and Zinn, pp. 137-144); and Islam, “Fortress Europe”                 (Yale Global Online, August 18, 2009).

 

9/23     Reading assignment:  Eitzen and Zinn, “The Globalization of Terror,”                                 Chua, “Globalizing Hate” (Eitzen and Zinn , pp. 224-231), Huq, “The Car-                       Bomb” (Eitzen and Zinn, pp. 231-233) and Herman and Peterson, “The                 Threat of Global State Terrorism” (Eitzen and Zinn, pp. 234-238), and                   Kahn, “Mumbai Terrorists Relied on New Technology for Attacks”                      (http://nytimes.com/2008/12/09/world/asia/09mumbai.html?) 

 

9/25     Reading assignment:

                        Crapo, “Writing Your Senator”

                        (http://crapo.senate.gov/for_kids/WritingYourSenator.cfm)

                        Find out who represents you in Congress (senators at                                              http://www.senate/gov/general/contact_information/senators_cfm.cfm

                        and representatives at upper left at http://www.house.gov/).

 

 

            Paper 5:  Voice.  Write a letter to a government official about an issue                                related to globalization.

 

 

The Social Dimension

 

9/28     Reading assignment:    Friedman, “The World Is Flat,” Ghemawat, “Why the                     World Isn’t Flat” (Eitzen and Zinn, pp. 43-50 and 18-22).  Also see                       MacKinnon, “Chinese Cell Phone Breaches North Korean Hermit                                  Kingdom” (http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/display.article?id=5145) and

                        Contiguglia,”New Undersea Cables to Expand Broadband in Africa”

                        (http://www.nytimes.com/2009/08/10/technology/10cable.html?                             scp=1&sq=African%20Broadband&st=cse)

 

9/30     Paper 6:  Position paper.  Is the world flat?  Assess the arguments and                             evidence and write a paper in support of one side or the other in this                      debate.

 

10/2     Reading assignment:  Eitzen and Zinn, “The Restructuring of Social                                    Arrangements,” and Ehrenreich and Hochschild, “Global Woman” (Eitzen              and Zinn, pp. 163-174), Ferus-Comelo, “Double Jeopardy”                                         (Eitzen and Zinn, pp. 87-98), Chamie, “The Global Abortion Bind”                        (http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/display.article?id=10886)

 

10/5     Reading assignment:  Kristof and WuDunn, “The Women's Crusade”                                  (http://www.nytimes.com/2009/08/23/magazine/23Women-t.html?                         scp=1&sp=Women's%20Crusade&st-sce)

 

            Paper 7:  Argument.  How does globalization affect gender                                                inequality?

 

10/7     Class will not meet.  See me for an appointment to discuss writing and revisions.  This is required.  You may not submit revisions until you have discussed your       writing with me.

 

10/9     Midterm exam

           

The Environmental Dimension

 

10/12   Reading assignment:    Batten, Manlove and Gryll, “Climate Refugees” and                         Field, “Global Warming” (Eitzen and Zinn, pp. 289-294),

                        Pachauri interview, “The IPCC:  The Science Is In on Climate Change”                   (http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/display.article?id=11724) and

                        Broder, “Climate Change Seen as Threat to U.S. Security”

                        (http://www.nytimes.com/2009/08/09/science/earth/09climate.html?                       scp=3&sq=climate%20change%20security&st=cse)

                                   

10/14   Reading assignment: Friedman, “Calling for a Green Revolution” (watch                             video clip at http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/video.jsp or read the transcript at                 http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/display.article?id=11539)  Take the ecological                 footprint quiz and read about the FAQ at the Web site Redefining Progress                        (http://www.myfootprint.org/en/).

 

10/16   Paper 8:  Summary and reflection.  What did you learn from the                                                 assignments for October 12 and 14?  Include both general and specific                     (personal) information.

 

The Cultural Dimension

 

10/19   Steger, “Global Culture,” Fink, “The Place of Community Globalization,”                          and Ainger, “Empires of the Senseless” (Eitzen and Zinn, pp. 145-162).                 Be prepared to discuss the reflection questions on p. 162.

 

10/21   Hand in:  Revisions of any two papers from among Papers 1-7.  (NB:  You      may only revise a paper that you wrote and received comments on.  This is   not an opportunity to write a paper you failed to turn in previously.)

 

10/23   Reading assignment:  Ritzer, ch. 1

 

10/26   Reading assignment:  Ritzer, ch. 2

 

10/28   Paper 9:  Description.  Write a vivid description of a                                                          particular example of “something.”

 

10/30   Reading assignment:  Ritzer, ch. 3

 

11/2     Assignment:  Watch one of the movies related to globalization  (See                                    “Films for Review” on your course page.)

 

            Paper 10:  Audience.  Write a movie review.  Identify the                                                  audience for the review and the appropriate audience for the film.

 

11/4     Reading assignment:  Ritzer, ch. 4

 

11/6     Paper 11:  Compare/Contrast.  Eat out twice, once at a globalized                                    (“nothing”) restaurant (e.g., McDonalds) and once at a local (“something”)                         restaurant (e.g., Huts).  Compare the experiences.

 

11/9     Reading assignment:  Ritzer, ch. 5

 

11/11   Reading assignment:  Ritzer, ch. 6

 

11/13   Paper 12:  Analysis.  What is Ritzer’s main argument in ch. 6?  How does                        he attempt to persuade the reader that his argument is correct?  What                      rhetorical devices and writing strategies does he use?  What evidence does                  he present?

 

 

GLOBALISMS:  IDEOLOGIES AND SOCIAL MOVEMENTS

 

What do people believe about globalization?  How do they promote, resist, or accommodate themselves to it?  Do beliefs matter?

 

11/16   Reading assignment:  Ritzer, ch. 7

                       

11/18   Reading assignment:  “Changing Global Structures:  Resistance and Social               Movements,” pp. 295-349 in Eitzen and Zinn.  Pay special attention to                 Bacon, “Hunger on the Border” (Eitzen and Zinn, pp. 323-327).

 

            In class:  A visit with Judith Rosenberg (Austin Tan Cerca de la Frontera)

                       

11/20   Review the Web sites on pp. 351-352 in Eitzen and Zinn.   Check your course                   page links “Local Organizations” and “Global Organizaitons.”   Also see                http://www.nytimes.com/2009/08/23/magazine/23Women-html?     ref+magazine. Pick a Web site of one organization to examine in greater detail.

 

            Paper 13:  Description.  Describe the Web site of an organization that                              relates to globalization.  In the case you examined, how is the internet                     being used to promote collaboration and address issues of shared concern?

 

11/23   Reading assignment:  Ritzer, ch. 8

 

11/25   Test on material covered since mid-term.

 

11/30   Reading day – no class.  Continue reading the book you chose from the                               reading list as the basis for your final review essay.  Also read the                          directions for the book review (see course page) and (under “Course                    Documents”) see the example from Sociological Insight (Masters, review               of Leichenko and O'Brien, Environmental Change and Globalization             (http://www.utexas.edu/cola/depts/sociology_files/documents/SI_1_1.pdf).

           

12/2     Reading day – no class.  Continue reading the book you chose from the reading                  list as the basis for your final review essay.  Use this time for individual                 appointments with me to discuss the book or any other concerns, as                       needed. These             appointments are optional.   I will be happy to give you                  feedback on a draft of whatever you have at this point.

 

12/4     Hand in:  Revisions of any two papers from among Papers 8-13.  (NB:  You    may only revise a paper that you wrote and received comments on.  This is   not an opportunity to write a paper you failed to turn in previously.)

 

            In class:  Discussion of the requirements for the final review essay.

                           Course evaluation.  Organize for peer responses to book review.                         

 

12/14   Submit the final review essay by 5:00 p.m.  This is a hard-and-fast deadline.            No late papers can be accepted.

            

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