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Christine L. Williams, Chair CLA 3.306, Mailcode A1700, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-232-6300

Jennifer Glass

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin

Professor
Jennifer Glass

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SOC 384L • Socl Stat: Basic Conc And Meth

46350 • Fall 2014
Meets MW 400pm-530pm CLA 0.118
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Description: 

This course covers basic statistical methods in the social sciences to give graduate students a foundation in quantitative sociological methods in preparation for more advanced quantitative methods courses in sociology and other fields. Topics include: frequency and probability distributions, sampling distributions, estimation, and hypothesis testing. The first section of the course deals primarily with the concepts and theoretical foundations of inference. The rest of the course focuses on statistical techniques and various applications including the use of t-tests for comparing means and proportions, Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) for understanding the relationship between categorical factors and a continuous dependent variable, contingency tables and measures of association for categorical and ordinal data, and simple and multiple regression techniques for the analysis of the relationship between continuous independent variables on a continuous dependent variable. Emphasis will be placed on understanding which method to use for a given problem and how to interpret the results of statistical tests. Students will be required to learn how to manipulate statistical formulas and to work with STATA.

 

SOC 308 • Fertility And Reproduction

46285 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm CLA 0.112
(also listed as WGS 301 )
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Description

Why do birth rates rise and fall?  How can the U.S. have both record rates of childlessness as well as the highest rates of teen childbearing and unwanted pregnancy in the industrialized world?  Why does educating women lower birth rates faster than any population control program in the Third World?  This course will explore when, why, how, and with whom Americans bear children, and how we compare to other developed and developing countries in the world.  We will explore infertility and its treatments, the ethics of surrogacy, voluntary childlessness, the rapid rise of nonmarital childbearing in the U.S. and other countries, the politics of childbirth and risks of maternal mortality in developed and developing countries, and the declining populations and rapid aging  of  rich countries including Japan, Italy, and Spain where women have basically stopped having children. 

SOC 395F • Work And Family Issues

46640 • Spring 2014
Meets W 300pm-600pm CLA 3.214F
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Desription

The separation of manufacturing and production from the family household was the hallmark of 19th century industrial capitalism and the foundation of contemporary gender inequality.  Ever since, industrialized societies have been struggling to ensure that workers provide time and effort to production outside the home while also bearing and raising the next generation of workers and consumers inside the home. Various solutions have been tried historically and cross-culturally, all grappling with the same questions:

1) How should the money and time consuming "labor" of producing and rearing children be compensated in an economic system based on market exchanges?  What happens in terms of gender inequality and child well-being when its not well compensated?

2) How can women's (and men’s) productive labor be integrated with their reproductive labor in a modern economic system?

The answers to these questions inevitably involve assumptions about appropriate gender relations, the value of childbearing and family life, the role of government in assisting families, and the basis of distributive justice.  Competing cultural views on these issues end up being resolved in part through the political process, in which certain family forms and certain patterns of income distribution are implicitly favored through legislation and public policies.  Our contemporary policy debates about birth control and abortion, nonmarital childbearing, employed mothers, day care, immigration, welfare reform, education cost and quality, divorce and child support, the Social Security crisis, men's responsibility for family caregiving are all echoes of these earlier unresolved questions.

We will compare and contrast how different societies have addressed the modern conundrum of work and family life, focusing on three key themes: 1) how the historical separation of work and home created immediate problems in Europe and the U.S., and how these are spreading through neoliberal globalization to the rest of the world, 2) why 19th century solutions broke down in the 20th century, leaving us a host of policy debates over the solutions to “family decline”,  3) how new models integrating work and family are faring, esp. the expanded welfare states of our European neighbors, and their implications for gender inequality. 

SOC 384L • Socl Stat: Basic Conc And Meth

46315 • Fall 2013
Meets MW 400pm-530pm CLA 0.120
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This course is intended to provide graduate students in sociology with (a) a level of literacy in statistical methods that will permit a basic understanding of most publications in the field's major journals, (b) the basic tools needed for a master's thesis that uses quantitative methods, (c) preparation for more advanced courses in this department and for independent study, and (d) a sensitivity for the limitations, as well as the strengths, of quantitative methods.

 

SOC 308 • Fertility And Reproduction

45630 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm CLA 0.130
(also listed as WGS 301 )
show description

Description

 

Why do birth rates rise and fall?  How can the U.S. have both record rates of childlessness as well as the highest rates of teen childbearing and unwanted pregnancy in the industrialized world?  Why does educating women lower birth rates faster than any population control program in the Third World?  This course will explore when, why, how, and with whom Americans bear children, and how we compare to other developed and developing countries in the world.  We will explore infertility and its treatments, the ethics of surrogacy, voluntary childlessness, the rapid rise of nonmarital childbearing in the U.S. and other countries, the politics of childbirth and risks of maternal mortality in developed and developing countries, and the declining populations and rapid aging  of  rich countries including Japan, Italy, and Spain where women have basically stopped having children. 

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