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Christine L. Williams, Chair CLA 3.306, Mailcode A1700, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-232-6300

Kristine Hopkins

Ph.D., The University of Texas at Austin

Research Assistant Professor
Kristine Hopkins

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Biography

Kristine Hopkins' research focuses on reproductive health issues in Texas, the US-Mexico border, and Latin America. Current projects include the an evaluation of reproductive health policies enacted by the 2011 Texas Legislature, the impact of contraceptive availability among Mexican origin women on the US-Mexico border, and the determinants of teen pregnancy in Texas. Previous work focused on the overuse of cesarean section in Brazil and Mexico, the childbirth and contraceptive experiences of HIV-positive women in Brazil, and the demand for sterilization among seropositive and seronegative women in Brazil

She co-produced the documentary Born in Brazil (Nascendo no Brasil in Portuguese), which was based on her dissertation research in Porto Alegre and Natal, Brazil. Born in Brazil shows Brazilian women's childbirth experiences in a country with cesarean rates of over 25 percent in the public sector and 70 percent in the private sector. The film challenges assumptions that women want to deliver surgically and shows the incentives for doctors to perform them. Born in Brazil was shown on Brazilian public television as well as at film festivals and conferences in the US, Canada, Mexico, and Brazil.

Hopkins teaches courses on health, reproduction, and demography.  In Fall 2013, she will teach Reproduction: Social & Political Forces.

NIH Biosketch

SOC 308 • Wom's Reprod Hlth Nonsci Maj

46320 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm CLA 0.112
(also listed as WGS 301 )
show description

Description

This course provides non-science majors with the scientific and social scientific knowledge needed to understand the basis of women’s reproductive health and the medical, cultural, and even political issues that surrounding women’s reproductive health.  Students will learn about female reproductive health across the lifespan, from birth through menopause.  Students will also learn about some of the ways that social, economic, and cultural factors influence a woman’s reproductive health.

 

Course Evaluation

  1. Three exams (25% each).  Format is multiple choice, labeling figures, definitions, and short answer. 
  2. One 3-5 page literature review of a women’s reproductive health topic (15%).
  3. Classroom component (10%); measured with iClicker assessments and small group in-class discussions.

 

SOC 354K • Sociology Of Health & Illness

46495 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm CLA 0.102
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Descripton

 Using lectures, documentaries, and class discussions as well as reflections of your own and others’ health and illness and representations of health and illness in the media, this course will critically examine the distribution of mortality and morbidity, how health and illness are defined and socially constructed, the experiences of illness, training and hierarchies of health care workers, interactions between health care providers and patients, alternative medicine, ethical issues, and health care financing. The majority of the course will focus on health and illness in the United States.

Course Evaluation

  1. Exams; 75% of grade. The lowest score of the first three exams will be dropped. The 4th exam is required. The exams will be a combination of multiple choice, and short answer questions based on the readings, lectures, and documentaries. 
  2. Two assignments; 15% of grade.
  3. Classroom component; 10% of grade; measured with iClicker assessments and small group in-class discussions. 

 

SOC 354K • Sociology Of Health & Illness

45845 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm CLA 0.102
show description

 Description

Using lectures, documentaries, and class discussions as well as reflections of your own and others’ health and illness and representations of health and illness in the media, this course will critically examine the distribution of mortality and morbidity, how health and illness are defined and socially constructed, the experiences of illness, training and hierarchies of health care workers, interactions between health care providers and patients, alternative medicine, ethical issues in health care, and health care financing. The majority of the course will focus on health and illness in the United States but will make some references to health in other countries and regions.

Reading Materials

  1. The Sociology of Health, Healing, and Illness, 7th Edition by Gregory L. Weiss and Lynne E. Lonnquist
  2. Readings on Blackboard
  3. 30 or so three inch by five inch (3x5) note cards.

Course Evaluation

  1. Exams; 75% of grade. The lowest score of the first three exams will be dropped. The 4th exam is REQUIRED. The exams will be a combination of multiple choice, and short/medium answer based on the readings, lectures, documentaries and other media. 
  2. Journal “mini-papers”; 20% of grade. 3 typewritten journal “mini-papers.”  Each journal entry is a very short paper (400-550 words) chronicling your experiences with and reflections about health, illness, and health care. 
  3. Classroom component; 5% of grade. The in-class component will be measured with impromptu small group in-class discussions.  This also gives me a very rough idea of attendance.  You’ll be able to drop at least 2 of the in-class discussions.

 

SOC 354K • Sociology Of Health & Illness

45455 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm BUR 212
show description

Course Organization & Objectives

Using lectures, documentaries, and class discussions as well as reflections of your own and others’ health and illness and representations of health and illness in the media, this course will critically examine the distribution of mortality and morbidity, how health and illness are defined and socially constructed, the experiences of illness, training and hierarchies of health care workers, interactions between health care providers and patients, alternative medicine, ethical issues, and health care financing. The majority of the course will focus on health and illness in the United States.

Reading Materials to Buy/Download

1.     The Sociology of Health, Healing, and Illness, 6th Edition by Gregory L. Weiss and Lynne E. Lonnquist, available at the University Co-op or online.   

2.     Readings are available in PDF on Blackboard. Additional required readings may also be posted on Blackboard throughout the semester.

3.     15 or so three inch by five inch (3x5) note cards.

Course Evaluation

1.     Exams; 75% of grade. The lowest score of the first three exams will be dropped. The 4th exam is REQUIRED. The exams will be a combination of multiple choice, and short/medium answer based on the readings, lectures, and documentaries.  Each exam is a maximum of 100 points and the highest three scored exams each count 25% of your final grade. If you do not take the 4th exam, the zero you receive for it will count as one of your three exams. See course schedule below for scheduled exam dates.

2.     Journal “mini-papers”; 15% of grade. 2 typewritten journal “mini-papers.”  Each journal entry is a very short paper (400-550 words) chronicling your experiences with and reflections about health, illness, and health care, using a sociological perspective. 

3.     Classroom component; 10% of grade. The in-class component will be measured with impromptu small group in-class discussions.  This also gives me a rough idea of attendance. 

SOC 308 • Wom's Reprod Hlth Nonsci Maj

46025 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm PHR 3.106
(also listed as WGS 301 )
show description

SOC 308: Women’s Reproductive Health for NonScience Majors

Course Description

To study women’s reproductive health is to study biology, chemistry, anatomy, physiology, endocrinology, female sexuality, and the social meaning of gender.  This course provides non-science majors with the scientific and social scientific knowledge needed to understand the basis of women’s reproductive health and the medical, cultural, and even political issues surrounding women’s reproductive health.  Students will learn about female reproductive health across the lifespan, from birth through menopause.  Students will also learn about some of the ways that social, economic, and cultural factors influence a woman’s reproductive health.

Required Texts & Materials

  1. Course packet at Paradigm Books, 407 W. 24th Street, just west of Guadalupe (abbrev. PKT)
  2. Robert Hatcher, et al., ed., Contraceptive Technology, 19th ed., 2007, (abbrev. CT).  Available in PDF in the “Course Documents” folder on Blackboard.
  3. Readings in PDF in the “Course Documents” folder on Blackboard (abbrev. BB).
  4. Approximately 20 three inch by five inch (3x5) note cards.

Course Evaluation

1.     Three exams.  Format is multiple choice, labeling figures, definitions, and short answer. 

2.     One 3-5 page literature review of a women’s reproductive health topic, due date April 12th; see “Paper Assignment” on Blackboard for more information.

3.     Classroom component.  In small groups, you’ll answer a question or questions I put to the class; then, as a class, we will share and discuss points made in the smaller groups. 

SOC 354K • Sociology Of Health & Illness

46185 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm BUR 116
show description

SOC 354: Sociology of Health and Illness

Course Organization & Objectives

Using lectures, documentaries, and class discussions as well as reflections of your own and others’ health and illness and representations of health and illness in the media, this course will critically examine the distribution of mortality and morbidity, how health and illness are defined and socially constructed, the experiences of illness, training and hierarchies of health care workers, interactions between health care providers and patients, alternative medicine, ethical issues, and health care financing. The majority of the course will focus on health and illness in the United States.

Reading Materials to Buy/Download

1.     The Sociology of Health, Healing, and Illness, 6th Edition by Gregory L. Weiss and Lynne E. Lonnquist, available at the University Co-op or online.   

2.     Readings are available in PDF on Blackboard. Additional required readings may also be posted on Blackboard throughout the semester.

3.     15 or so three inch by five inch (3x5) note cards.

Course Evaluation

1.     Exams; 75% of grade. The lowest score of the first three exams will be dropped. The 4th exam is REQUIRED. The exams will be a combination of multiple choice, and short/medium answer based on the readings, lectures, and documentaries.  Each exam is a maximum of 100 points and the highest three scored exams each count 25% of your final grade. If you do not take the 4th exam, the zero you receive for it will count as one of your three exams. See course schedule below for scheduled exam dates.

2.     Journal “mini-papers”; 15% of grade. 2 typewritten journal “mini-papers.”  Each journal entry is a very short paper (400-550 words) chronicling your experiences with and reflections about health, illness, and health care, using a sociological perspective. 

3.     Classroom component; 10% of grade. The in-class component will be measured with impromptu small group in-class discussions.  This also gives me a rough idea of attendance. 

SOC 354K • Sociology Of Health & Illness

45625 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm BUR 212
show description

Description:

Using lectures, documentaries, and class discussions as well as reflections of your own and others’ health and illness and representations of health and illness in the media, this course will critically examine the distribution of mortality and morbidity, how health and illness are defined and socially constructed, the experiences of illness, training and hierarchies of health care workers, interactions between health care providers and patients, alternative medicine, ethical issues in health care, and health care financing. The majority of the course will focus on health and illness in in the United States but will make some references to health in other countries and regions.

Text:


1.    The Sociology of Health, Healing, and Illness, 6th Edition by Gregory L. Weiss and Lynne E. Lonnquist
2.    PDFs of readings on Blackboard
3.    20 or so three inch by five inch (3x5) note cards.


Grading:


1.    Four exams. The lowest score of the first three exams will be dropped. The 4th exam is REQUIRED. The exams will be a combination of multiple choice, and short/medium answer based on the readings, lectures, guest speakers, and videos. Each exam is a maximum of 100 points and the highest three scored exams each count 20% of your final grade. If you do not take the 4th exam, the zero you receive for it will count as one of your three exams. (75% of grade)
2.    Journal. You will keep a typewritten journal chronicling your experiences with and reflections about health, illness, and health care; a total of 5 entries for the semester are expected (400-550 words each). The journal have two parts: an observation and analysis of the observation. Your observations should be drawn from your own life and can include notes on your own or others’ health, past or present contact with providers and facilities, discussions with others about health and health care, as well as observations about the portrayal of health and health care by the media (news, TV, movies, etc.).  Your analysis should use sociological principles that you learn in the course.  (20% of grade)
3.    Classroom component. The in-class component will be measured by small group in-class assignments.  For short in-class assignments I will ask you to get into groups of 2 or 3 people to discuss a question I put to the class; one member of the group will write a short summary of your discussion on a 3x5 card. I’ll do enough of these so that you’ll be able to drop at least 2 of them. (5% of grade)

SOC 308 • Wom's Reprod Hlth Nonsci Maj

46285 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm CPE 2.216
show description

SOC 308.2: Women’s Reproductive Health for NonScience Majors

Unique #46285; meets with WGS 301.7 (48360), Nur 307.1 (59535)

Spring 2010, TTh 3:30-4:45, CPE 2.216

Version January 12, 2010 (NOTE: Packet page numbers will be updated in the first week of the semester)

Course Coordinator/Instructor:

Teaching Assistant:

Dr. Kristine Hopkins

Kimberly Walker

Office: 1906 Main Building (19th floor of the Tower)

Office: TBA

Mailbox: Main 1800

Mailbox: TBA

Phone: 471.8313

Phone:

e-mail: khopkins@prc.utexas.edu

e-mail: kimbabe613@sbcglobal.net

Office Hours: Mondays 2:30-4:00 pm & by appt.

Office Hours: TBA & by appt.

Course Description

To study women’s reproductive health is to study biology, chemistry, anatomy, physiology, endocrinology, female sexuality, and the social meaning of gender.  This course provides non-science majors with the scientific and social scientific knowledge needed to understand the basis of women’s reproductive health and the medical, cultural, and even political issues that surrounding women’s reproductive health.  Students will learn about female reproductive health across the lifespan, from birth through menopause.  Students will also learn about some of the ways that social, economic, and cultural factors influence a woman’s reproductive health.

Required Texts & Materials

  1. Course packet at Paradigm Books, 407 W. 24th Street, just west of Guadalupe (abbrev. PACKET); readings also available in PDF in the “Course Documents” folder on Blackboard.
  2. Robert Hatcher, et al., ed., Contraceptive Technology, 19th ed., 2007, (abbrev. CT).  Available in PDF in the “Course Documents” folder on Blackboard.
  3. Approximately 20 three inch by five inch (3x5) note cards.

Course Evaluation

  1. Two exams and a comprehensive final, dates below.  Format is multiple choice, labeling figures, definitions, and short answer. 
  2. One homework assignment, due date April 13th; content to be announced on Blackboard.
  3. Classroom component.  In small groups, you’ll a question or questions I put to the class; on a 3x5 note card, one member of the group will write out the group members’ names and a short summary of your discussion.  Then, as a class, we will share and discuss points made in the smaller groups.  We’ll collect and record the 3x5 note cards at the end of the discussion.  There will be 10-12 of these throughout the semester.  The 5 “Discussion Labs” count double.  I will drop two regular day discussions but not any of the discussion labs.

 

Evaluation Item

% of total

 

Grading Scale

 

Exam #1 – Feb. 16

20

 

Lower %

Upper %

Grade

Exam #2 – March 30

20

 

93

100

A

Comprehensive final –  May 18

30

 

 

90

92.9

A-

Homework – April 13

20

87

89.9

B+

Classroom component

10

83

86.9

B

Total

100%

80

82.9

B-

 

 

77

79.9

C+

 

 

 

73

76.9

C

 

 

 

70

72.9

C-

 

 

 

67

69.9

D+

 

 

 

63

66.9

D

 

 

 

60

62.9

D-

 

 

 

0

59.9

F

Additional Office Hours

Dr. Joanne Richards who taught this course for several years before retiring from the Pharmacy School in May 2006 and who co-taught the course with me in Spring 2007, 2008, and 2009, has once again generously offered to teach the "hard science" portion of the course this semester.  Feel free to email (joanne-r@mail.utexas.edu) or call (345.4479) Dr. Richards to ask questions about her lecture material. 

Classroom Etiquette

  • Be on time.
  • Be respectful when making a comment or responding to others’ comments.
  • Turn off cell phones or set to silent mode.
  • In an attempt to learn the names of everyone in class, I will use a seating chart, which I will finalize on Thursday, January 28th.  You choose to sit where you want; beginning 1/28, please sit in the same seat for the rest of the semester.

Academic Honesty

I expect academic honesty.  I encourage you to ask others for editorial advice or for assistance in finding data or reference works, and to study together for exams.  You are, however, expected to turn in original work and to take all exams on your own.  

Special Policies

  1. I will provide any and all accommodations and support services for students in this course who have special needs identified by the Services for Students with Disabilities.  Please see me during the first week of the semester so that the appropriate arrangements can be made.
  2. I welcome questions and comments via e-mail.  I expect all e-mail communications to have a greeting (such as “Dear Dr. Hopkins”) and to be signed.
  3. I will give make-up exams only with a pre-approved university-excused reason or with a documented medical emergency or death in the family that receives University approval. 
  4. Students who miss exams without prior approval receive a grade of "0" for the exam. 
  5. I will give a grade of "incomplete" only for compelling cases (e.g., documented illness or death in the immediate family) that, with University approval, precludes completion of the course.
  6. Note:  I do not return exams but I am happy to share them with you.  If you would like to see your exams, along with the key, please see either me or the TA during our office hours.

COURSE SCHEDULE

Complete the reading assignments below before the class listed.  Note that additional required readings may also occasionally be posted on Blackboard.

PART 1:  REPRODUCTIVE ANATOMY, MENSTRUATION

T—1/19   Course Introduction, Dr. Kristine Hopkins and Dr. Joanne Richards:  “How we learn about women’s reproductive health.”  Female Reproductive Anatomy, Form and Function, Richards

Read     PACKET:  (1) Alexander et al., Ch. 4, "Female Sexual Anatomy and Physiology," Packet (PCK) pp. 68-72/ORG pp. 105-109; (2) Campbell & Reese, Concept 46.3 & 46.4, PCK pp. 48-57/ORG pp. 969-978; (3) Cowan & Richards, “Our Struggle for Reproductive Freedom,” pp. xx-xx.

Th—1/21 The History of the Science of Female Reproductive Anatomy, Hopkins

Read     PACKET:  (1) Smith-Rosenberg and Rosenberg, “The Female Animal:  Medical and Biological Views of Woman and

Her Role in 19th Century America,” pp. xxx-xxx; (2) Lorber, “Believing Is Seeing,” pp. xxx-xxx

T—1/26   It’s a Girl:  Pre-Natal Sex Determination and Development, Richards

Read     PACKET:  (1) Campbell & Reese, Concept 15.4, PCK pp. 16-19/ORG pp. 285-288; Concepts 45.2 and 45.3, PCK pp. 23-30/ORG pp. 958-959; and “gonadal sex hormones,” PCK pp. 36-37/ORG pp. 958-959; (2) Renzetti and Curran, “The Sex Chromosomes and Sexual Differentiation,” pp. xxx-xxx; (3) Richardson, “Not by Testosterone Alone,” pp. xxx-xxx

Th—1/28 The Ovarian Cycle (Oogenesis) and Spermatogenesis, Richards

Read     CT:  Chapter 2

PACKET:  (1) Alexander et al., Ch. 4, PCK pp. 68-78/ORG pp. 105-115; "The Menstrual Cycle," PCK pp. 72-75/ORG 109-112; (2) Campbell & Reese, Concept 46.4, PCK pp. 52-57/ORG pp. 973-978

T—2/2     Menstruation:  Hormonal Events, Richards

Read     CT:  Chapter 2

PACKET:  (1) Review Alexander et al., Ch. 4, "The Menstrual Cycle," PCK pp. 72-75/ORG 109-112; (2) Campbell & Reese, Concept 46.4, PCK pp. 52-57/ORG pp. 973-978

 

Th—2/4   Menstrual Difficulties, Richards

Read     CT:  Chapter 20

            PACKET:  Review Alexander et al., Ch. 4, "Problems with Menstruation," PCK pp. 75-78/ORG pp. 112-115

T—2/9     Puberty, Menarche, and Menstruation:  Honor or Curse?  Hopkins

Read     PACKET:  (1) Brumberg, “’Something Happens to Girls:  Menarche and the Emergence of the Modern American Hygienic Imperative,” pp. xxx-xxx; (2) Simes & Berg, “Surreptitious Learning:  Menarche and Menstrual Product Advertisements,” pp. xxx-xxx.

Th—2/11 Theories of Menstrual Pathology, followed by a Discussion Lab:  Menstrual Difficulties and PMS, Hopkins

Read     PACKET:  Tavris, “Misdiagnosing the Body:  Pre-menstrual syndrome, Postmenstrual syndrome, and other Normal Diseases,” pp. xxx-xxx

T—2/16  FIRST MIDTERM EXAM  

 

PART 2:  SEXUALITY, PREGNANCY & CHILDBIRTH

T—2/18   Sex, Gender, and Sexuality, Hopkins

Read     PACKET:  (1) Fausto-Sterling, “The Five Sexes, Revisited," pp. xxx-xxx;
(2) Fausto-Sterling, “Frameworks of Desire,” pp. xxx-xxx;
(3) Morris, “The Missing Vagina Monologue” p. xxx

Th—2/23 VIDEO:  “Kinsey,” excerpts of documentary directed by Barak Goodman and John Maggio, 2005

Followed by Discussion Lab:  Sex and Gender, Hopkins

Read        PACKET:  Fausto-Sterling, “Sex and the Single Brain,” pp. xxx-xxx

Th—2/25 Fertility, Conception and Infertility Problems and Treatments, Hopkins

Read     PACKET:  (1) Alexander et al., Ch. 6, "Infertility" to the end of the chapter, PCK pp. 167-180/ORG pp. 226-239;
(2) Campbell & Reese, Concepts 13.2 and 13.3, PCK pp. 5-12/ORG pp. 240-247;
(3) Ordonez, “Management of Infertility,” pp. xxx-xxx;
(4) Henig, “Pandora’s Baby,” pp. xxx-xxx

T —3/2  Implantation, the Hormones of Pregnancy and the Formation of the Placenta, Richards

Read     PACKET:  (1) Alexander et al., Ch. 6, "Pregnancy & Childbirth," PCK pp. 133-142/ORG pp. 192-201;
(2) Campbell & Reese, Concept 46.5, PCK pp. 57-63/ORG pp. 978-984;
(3) “Early Stages of Development from Fertilization to Implantation” figure, pp. xxx-xxx;
(4) “Implantation of the Blastocyst” figure, p. xxx

Th—3/4  Pre-Natal Health and Pregnancy, Dr. Robin Page, UT School of Nursing

Read     CT:  Chapter 23

PACKET:  (1) Alexander et al., Ch. 6, "Prenatal Care" & "Complications of Pregnancy," PCK pp. 142-156/ORG pp. 201-215;
(2) Loveland Cook, et al, “Access Barriers and the Use of Prenatal Care by Low-Income, Inner-City Women,” pp. xxx-xxx

T —3/9 A Brief Overview of Changing Childbirth Practices and VIDEO:  “The Stages of Labor”, Hopkins
Read     PACKET:  Gawande, “The Score:  How Birth Went Industrial,” pp. xxx-xxx

T—3/11  Breastfeeding and Postpartum Issues, Richards

Read     CT:  Chapter 18

PACKET:  (1) Alexander et al., Ch. 6, "Breastfeeding," PCK pp. 163-167/ORG pp. 222-226 and Ch. 12, "Mood Disorders," PCK pp. 231-236/ORG pp. 476-481;
(2) National Women's Health Information Center, “Frequently Asked Questions about Postpartum Depression,” pp. xxx-xxx

SPRING BREAK (March 13-21)

T—3/23 VIDEO:  “The Business of Being Born”, Hopkins

Read     PACKET:  (1) Alexander et al., Ch. 6, "Childbirth," PCK pp. 156-163/ORG pp. 215-222;
(2) Davis-Floyd, "The Technocratic, Humanistic, and Holistic Paradigms of Childbirth," pp. xxx-xxx

 

Th—3/25 Discussion Lab:  Pregnancy and Childbirth, Hopkins

Read     PACKET:  (review) Davis-Floyd, "The Technocratic, Humanistic, and Holistic Paradigms of Childbirth," pp. xxx-xxx

T—3/30  SECOND MIDTERM EXAM   

 

PART 3: CONTRACEPTION, MENOPAUSE, MEN’S ROLES, AND REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH IN INTERNATIONAL PERSPECTIVE

Th—4/1   Contraception:  The Birth Control Pill, Patch, and Ring, Richards

Read     CT:  Chapter 3 (skim, make sure to look at tables and figures), Chapter 11 & Chapter 12 (skim)

PACKET:  (1) Alexander et al., Ch. 5, Beginning of chapter through "Hormonal Methods," PCK pp. 79-97/ORG pp. 138-156;
(2) “Taking Birth Control Pills” informational flyer, pp. xxx-xxx

T—4/6  Contraception: Access to Oral Contraceptives in the U.S., Hopkins

Read     PACKET:  (1) Potter et al., “Cross-border Procurement of Contraception: Estimates from a Postpartum Survey in El Paso, Texas,” pp. xxx-xxx;
(2) Grimes, “Editorial: Over-the-Counter Oral Contraceptives—An Immodest Proposal?” and Trussell et al., “Should Oral Contraceptives Be Available without Prescription?,” pp. xxx-xxx

Th—4/8   Contraception:  The IUD and Depo-Provera, Barbara Blizzard, Professional Nurse Practitioner, Student Health Center

Read     CT:  Chapters 7 & 9

T—4/13 Abortion and Roe v. Wade, Peggy Romberg, Former CEO, Women’s Health and Family Planning Association of Texas

Read     PACKET:  (1) Alexander et al., Ch. 5, "Handling an Unplanned Pregnancy" through end of chapter PCK pp. 111-131/ORG pp. 170-190;
(2) Guttmacher Institute, "Facts on Induced Abortion in the United States," pp. xxx-xxx;
(3) Jones et al., "Patterns in the Socioeconomic Characteristics of Women Obtaining Abortions in 2000-2001," pp. xxx-xxx

Th—4/15 Contraception: Barrier Methods & Emergency Contraception, Sharon Roberson, Chief Pharmacist, University Health Services & UHS Pharmacy Professor

Read     CT:  Chapters 13 & 14

PACKET:  (1) Alexander et al., Ch. 5, "Barrier Methods" through "Emergency Birth Control," PCK pp. 97-111/ORG 156-170;
(2) ARHP, “Facts about Emergency Contraception (EC),” pp. xxx-xxx

T—4/20 Unplanned Pregnancies among Teens and 20-somethings, Hopkins

Read     PACKET:  (1) National Campaign, “Briefly:  Unplanned Pregnancy among 20-Somethings,” pp. xxx-xxx;
(2) “Briefly: What 20-Somethings Are Saying About Pregnancy, Sex, and Childbearing,” pp. xxx-xxx

Th—4/22 Discussion Lab:  Contraception, Unplanned Pregnancies, and Abortion, Hopkins

Read     CT:  Chapter 24

PACKET:  (1) Shorto, "Contra-Contraception," pp. xxx-xxx;
(2) Roe v. Wade Timeline, p xxx-xxx

T—4/27 Perimenopause and Menopause, Sharon Dormire, UT School of Nursing
Read     CT:  Chapter 26

PACKET:  Alexander et al., Ch. 8, "Menopause and Hormone Replacement Therapy" PCK pp. 207-230/ORG pp. 288-311

Th—4/29 Men’s Role in Promoting Healthy Reproductive Outcomes for Women, Michael Hayes, Deputy for Family Initiatives, Child Support Division, Office of the Attorney General of Texas

Read     PACKET:  (1) UNFPA, "Partnering with Boys and Men," pp. xxx-xxx;
(2) Mehta, "Communicating with Men to Promote Family Planning: Lessons Learned and Suggestions for Programming," pp. xxx-xxx
(3) Greene, "Lessons and Future Programmatic Directions for Involving Men in Reproductive Health," pp. xxx-xxx

T—5/4     Sexual Assault, Intimate Partner Violence, and Reproductive Health, Jenny Drda Black, Austin/Travis County Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner

Read     PACKET:  Heise et al., “A Global Overview of Gender-based Violence,” pp. xxx-xxx

Th—5/6   International Issues in Women’s Reproductive Health:  Case Study in Maternal Morbidity and Mortality in the Developing World and excerpts of documentary “A Walk to Beautiful,” Hopkins

Read     PACKET: (1) Donovan & Wulf, “Women and Societies Benefit When Childbearing Is Planned,” pp. xxx-xxx;
(2) UNFPA, “Fistula Q & A,” pp. xxx-xxx

 

COMPREHENSIVE FINAL EXAM: Tuesday, May 18, 7:00–10:00 pm (note: unfortunately, this is the very last exam time in the final exam period)

 

Research

"Oral Contraceptive Use on the U.S.-Mexico Border: A Qualitative Study." R03 HD047507

Women in many countries can purchase OCs over-the-counter (OTC) but in the US a prescription is required, potentially creating a barrier to contraceptive access. This qualitative study in El Paso, Texas, provides a unique "natural experiment":  residents can take advantage of the differing medical practices on either side of the border and obtain oral contraceptives either with or without clinician involvement.

This study seeks to produce an in-depth understanding of the contraceptive experiences of low-income Mexican-origin women who live on the US-Mexico border and answers:

  • how they experience and negotiate health services;
  • how and why they make decisions about where to obtain their pills;
  • where and to whom they turn when something goes wrong;
  • how their partners and close family members support or hinder their pill use;
  • attitudes about the timing of childbearing and marital relationships.

Below are the in-depth interview guides used in the study.  Includes guides done at enrollment and those done approximately 1 year later.  Each second round in-depth interview was tailored to the participant's specific situation so I provide two examples below.  Feel free to contact me for more examples.

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