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Christine L. Williams, Chair CLA 3.306, Mailcode A1700, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-232-6300

Susan E Marshall

Ph.D., University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Professor
Susan E Marshall

Contact

Biography

Research

gender; political sociology; U.S. feminist and antifeminist movements; women's political history; right-wing politics; gender, race, and class differences in political attitudes

Research Subject Headings: Gender, Inequality, Politics, Race and ethnicity

SOC 317M • Intro To Social Research

46360 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 1100am-1200pm CLA 0.122
show description

Descripton:

This course offers hands-on instruction to undergraduate majors in the logic of  inquiry and its application in sociological research.  Students will gain practice in survey research by composing and analyzing the results of a campus questionnaire. 

Text: 

Neuman, Basics of Social Research, paper.

Grading Policy:

Attendance is required. Weekly lab is mandatory.

Homeworks (4) 50%

Cumulative Final Exam  30%

Lab 20%

SOC 333K • Sociology Of Gender

46460 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 930am-1100am CLA 1.106
(also listed as WGS 322 )
show description

Description:

This course examines the social and cultural construction of gender, focusing on women and men in U.S. society.  We will explore how gender is experienced by different groups of men and women, with a focus on race/ethnicity, sexuality, class, and nationality.  The course begins with description of current gender stereotypes in popular culture, and differences in the socialization and education of girls and boys.  Next we will examine gender differences in the workplace, exploring the reasons for the persistent gap in pay between employed men and women.  The third part of the course examines women’s changing relationship to the home and work, including changes in the meanings of marriage and motherhood, with a focus on the lives of impoverished women.  This section also reviews public policy responses to women’s poverty.  The final part of the course examines the impact of globalization on men and women around the world.

SOC 317M • Intro To Social Research

46130 • Fall 2013
Meets MW 1100am-1200pm CLA 1.102
show description

Descripton:

This course offers hands-on instruction to undergraduate majors in the logic of  inquiry and its application in sociological research.  Students will gain practice in survey research by composing and analyzing the results of a campus questionnaire. 

Text: 

Neuman, Basics of Social Research, paper.

Grading Policy:

Attendance is required. Weekly lab is mandatory.

Homeworks (4) 50%

Cumulative Final Exam  30%

Lab 20%

SOC 317M • Intro To Social Research

45705 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 1100am-1200pm CLA 0.106
show description

Descripton:

This course offers hands-on instruction to undergraduate majors in the logic of  inquiry and its application in sociological research.  Students will gain practice in survey research by composing and analyzing the results of a campus questionnaire. 

 

Text: 

Neuman, Basics of Social Research, paper.

 

Requirements:  

Grading Policy:

Attendance is required. Weekly lab is mandatory.

Homeworks (4) 50%

Cumulative Final Exam  30%

Lab 20%

SOC 333K • Sociology Of Gender

45820 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 930am-1100am CLA 1.106
(also listed as WGS 322 )
show description

This course examines the social and cultural construction of gender, focusing on women and men in U.S. society.  We will explore how gender is experienced by different groups of men and women, with a focus on race/ethnicity, sexuality, class, and nationality.  The course begins with description of current gender stereotypes in popular culture, and differences in the socialization and education of girls and boys.  Next we will examine gender differences in the workplace, exploring the reasons for the persistent gap in pay between employed men and women.  The third part of the course examines women’s changing relationship to the home and work, including changes in the meanings of marriage and motherhood, with a focus on the lives of impoverished women.  This section also reviews public policy responses to women’s poverty.  The final part of the course examines the impact of globalization on men and women around the world.

SOC 317M • Intro To Social Research

45500 • Fall 2012
Meets MW 1100am-1200pm BUR 214
show description

Prerequisites:
 SOC 317L

 Course

Description:

This course offers hands-on instruction to undergraduate majors in the logic of inquiry and its application in sociological research. Students will gain practice in survey research by composing and analyzing the results of a questionnaire administered to undergraduates on campus.

Grading Policy:

Attendance is required. Weekly lab is mandatory.

Homeworks (4) 50%

Cumulative Final Exam  30%

Lab 20%

Texts:

Neuman, Basics of Social Research

SOC 317M • Intro To Social Research

45490 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 1100am-1200pm BUR 130
show description

Prerequisites:
 SOC 317L

 Course

Description:

This course offers hands-on instruction to undergraduate majors in the logic of inquiry and its application in sociological research. Students will gain practice in survey research by composing and analyzing the results of a questionnaire administered to undergraduates on campus.

Grading Policy:

Attendance is required. Weekly lab is mandatory.

Homeworks (4) 50%

Cumulative Final Exam  30%

Lab 20%

Texts:

Neuman, Basics of Social Research

SOC 333K • Sociology Of Gender

45600 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 930am-1100am BUR 212
(also listed as WGS 322 )
show description

Description

This course examines the social and cultural construction of gender, focusing on women and men in U.S. society.  We will explore how gender is experienced by different groups of men and women, with a focus on race/ethnicity, sexuality, class, and nationality.  The course begins with description of current gender stereotypes in popular culture, and differences in the socialization and education of girls and boys.  Next we will examine gender differences in the workplace, exploring the reasons for the persistent gap in pay between employed men and women.  The third part of the course examines women’s changing relationship to the home and work, including changes in the meanings of marriage and motherhood, with a focus on the lives of impoverished women.  This section also reviews public policy responses to women’s poverty.  The final part of the course examines the impact of globalization on men and women around the world.

Texts

The required readings for this course are contained within the following three books:

ANDERSEN. Thinking about Women, 9th ed. 2011. (paper)

COHEN. Men and Masculinity: A Text Reader. 2001. (paper)

McKEE and STONE. Gender and Culture in America, 3rd ed. 2007. (paper)

Grading Requirements

There are a total of four exams for this course: three mid-term exams and a cumulative final exam administered during the exam period. Your final grade is based upon your top three exam scores. There are no make-up exams. If you miss an exam, plan to take the cumulative final. The final exam is optional for students who take all three midterm exams; it is an opportunity to improve your course grade.

Please note: If you miss an exam, you will be scored a 0. 

Midterm exam contents include true-false and multiple-choice items and a take-home essay that will be posted on the class Blackboard. The optional cumulative final has no essays. Students have two weeks after exams are returned to question their exam grade during office hours of the T.A. or the instructor.

There are no extra-credit provisions for this course. All grades are based on test scores.

No curves are applied to individual exam scores. Dropping the lowest test score is usually sufficient to produce a normal final grade distribution. Students are cautioned not to rely on instructor intervention concerning grades.

ATTENDANCE POLICY. Students are expected to attend class and will be held accountable for all lecture material.

Neither the instructor nor the TA will provide class notes to absent students. Absent students should check the class Blackboard site for important announcements.

Please turn off and put away cell phones before class begins. Texting during class is not permitted.

Computers may be used only for course purposes. Students who violate these rules will be marked absent and asked to leave.

SOC 317M • Intro To Social Research

45325 • Fall 2011
Meets MW 1100am-1200pm BUR 130
show description

Prerequisites:
 SOC 317L

 Course

 Description:

This course offers hands-on instruction to undergraduate majors in the logic of inquiry and its application in sociological research. Students will gain practice in survey research by composing and analyzing the results of a questionnaire administered to undergraduates on campus.

 Grading Policy:

 Attendance is required. Weekly lab is mandatory.

 Texts:

 Neuman, Basics of Social Research

SOC 317M • Intro To Social Research

46065 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 1100am-1200pm BUR 130
show description

Prerequisites:
 SOC 317L

 Course

 

Description:

This course offers hands-on instruction to undergraduate majors in the logic of inquiry and its application in sociological research. Students will gain practice in survey research by composing and analyzing the results of a questionnaire administered to undergraduates on campus.

 

Grading Policy:

 

Attendance is required. Weekly lab is mandatory.

 

Texts:

 

Neuman, Basics of Social Research

SOC 333K • Sociology Of Gender

46155 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 930am-1100am BUR 212
(also listed as WGS 322 )
show description

Cross Listed with WGS 322

 

 Most of the required readings for this course are contained within the following three books:

 ANDERSEN.  Thinking about Women, 8th ed.  2009.  (paper)

 COHEN.  Men and Masculinity: A Text Reader.  2001.  (paper)

STONE and McKEE.  Gender and Culture in America, 3rd ed.  2007.   (paper)

 

We will use Blackboard to post exam questions, grades, and other course information.  Only students who have registered an email address have access to this site.  To register an email address or to change your email address, go to: www.utexas.edu/cc/blackboard/tutorials/index.html.  See “For Students,” “Changing Your Email Address.”  Check your access early in the semester and contact us if you have problems.  Instructors cannot post grades to unlisted (JDoe) accounts.

 

GRADING POLICY

         There are a total of four exams for this course:  three midterm exams and a cumulative final exam held during the exam period.  Your course grade is based upon your top three exam scores.  There are no make-up exams.  If you miss an exam, you must take the cumulative final exam to pass the course.  The final exam is optional for students who take all three midterm exams; it is an opportunity to improve your course grade.

         Midterm exam contents include true-false and multiple-choice items and a take-home essay posted on the class Blackboard.  The optional cumulative final exam has no essays.  Students have two weeks after exams are returned to question their exam grade during office hours of the T.A. or the instructor.

         There are no extra-credit provisions for this course.  All grades are based on test scores.

         No curves are applied to individual exam scores.  A curve may be applied to assign final grades at the end of the semester.  This final grade adjustment will never be lower than standard grade cut-off (60, 70, 80, 90).  Students are cautioned not to rely on curves in this course. 

 

ATTENDANCE POLICY.  Students are expected to attend class and will be held accountable for all lecture material.  Neither the instructor nor the TA will provide class notes to absent students.   Absent students should check the class Blackboard site for important announcements. 

         Please turn off cell phones during class time.  You are welcome to use your laptops, but this privilege will be revoked if used for other purposes than class note-taking.

 

 

SOC 317M • Intro To Social Research

45470 • Fall 2010
Meets MW 1100am-1200pm BUR 130
show description

Prerequisites:
SOC 317L

Course Description:


This course offers hands-on instruction to undergraduate majors in the logic of inquiry and its application in sociological research. Students will gain practice in survey research by composing and analyzing the results of a questionnaire administered to undergraduates on campus.

Grading Policy
Attendance is required. Weekly lab is mandatory.

Texts
Neuman, Basics of Social Research

SOC 317M • Intro To Social Research

46320 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 1100-1200 BUR 130
show description

SOC 317M / 46320/ Spring 2010            Instructor:  Dr. Susan Marshall

Intro. to Social Research Methods            Office: BUR 514, Weds. 1- 3           

Required Lab:  Tuesday, 12-2; BUR 214                              Phone:  232-6318

Lab Instructor:  Kristen Adkins Butler                                 E-mail:  sem@mail.utexas.edu

COURSE SYLLABUS


Course Objectives

            This course presents the application of the scientific method to the social sciences.  From its origins in the experimental method of the physical sciences to present-day public opinion polls and computer analysis, the basic logic of scientific research has changed little. 

            Students will learn the logical steps for conducting valid research, from developing a research question through measurement, data collection, and analysis.   The required lab will be devoted to completion of a term project, which will give all students hands-on experience in empirical research. 

            Students will develop technical research skills that can be applied to a diverse range of future careers, a greater appreciation of the rigor of the discipline of sociology, and enhanced critical abilities to assess the multitude of information that characterizes contemporary life.

 

Textbooks

            All of the required reading for this course is contained in the textbook listed below.    

            Neuman.  2007.  The Basics of Social Research, 2nd ed.  Pearson.  (paper)

            Supplementary materials will be posted on the class Blackboard (BB).  See your lab syllabus for additional assignments.

            A packet of class surveys needed to complete the term projects will be available for purchase midway through the semester.  The typical price for the packet is about $10.

 

I.            INTRODUCTION:  THE  RESEARCH  PROCESS  (Jan. 19 - 26)

            Neuman, pp. 2-10, 15-17, 29-39

 

II.            BASIC RESEARCH DESIGN

 

            A.            VARIABLE  CONCEPTUALIZATION  and  MEASUREMENT  (Jan. 28 - Feb. 9)

                        Neuman, pp. 91-107, 109-24

 

            B.            EXPERIMENTS  and  THE  LOGIC  OF  CAUSALITY  (Feb. 11 - 16)

                        Neuman, Chapter 8 and pp. 17 - 20

 

            C.            INDICATORS: Questionnaire Construction  (Feb. 18 - 25)

                        Neuman, Chapter 7

                        BB: Survey Indicator Guidelines

 

     D.           SAMPLING (March 2 - 11)

Neuman, Chapter 6

BB: Probability Sampling Review

 

 

** Homework #1 **  Research Project Literature Review ** (Due February 18)

** Homework #2 **  Research Project Survey Items ** (Due March 9)

 

III.  DATA ANALYSIS 

 

            A.            INDEXES and SCALES  (March 23 - 25)

                        Neuman, pp. 124-38

                        BB: Index and Scale Construction

 

            B.            UNIVARIATE, BIVARIATE, and MULTIVARIATE ANALYSIS  (March 30 – April 15)

                        Neuman, Chapter 10

                        BB: Data Presentation and Analysis

 

IV.            ALTERNATIVE METHODS OF DATA COLLECTION

 

A.      FIELD STUDIES  (April 20 - 22)

Neuman, Chapter 11

 

            B.            AVAILABLE  DATA  (April 27 - 29)

                        Neuman, Chapter 9

 

V.            RESEARCH  APPLICATIONS  (May 4 - 6)

            Neuman, pp. 10-15 and Chapter 3

 

** Homework #3 ** Research Project Methods Section ** (Due April 13)

** Homework #4 ** Research Project Analysis Section ** (Due May 4)

 

GRADING POLICY:

            Homeworks (4)                                                      50%

            Cumulative Final Exam (May 15, 7 pm)                        30%

            Lab                                                                      20%

                                                                                     100%

 

Tests and Assignments.  There is only one exam in this course, a cumulative final exam given during the final exam period.  There will be two quizzes given in lab that constitute part of the lab grade.

            There are 4 required class homeworks.  All homeworks are sections of your research project and are due at the beginning of class.  Class homeworks turned in late will receive a 5-point deduction per day.  No homeworks will be accepted once work is returned to the class (1 week from due date).  Refer to your lab syllabus for the policy and schedule of lab assignments.

            Please note: Students may only enroll in Soc317M twice.  This includes Q-drops processed after the 12th class day.  The deadline for Q-drops without instructor input is Feb. 15.  Thereafter, University policy permits instructors to approve Q-drops only for students with a current course grade of C or better.

 

Attendance.   Attendance is mandatory for success in this course.  Students missing more than 2 class sessions will receive a 1-point deduction in their final grade for every additional class missed.  Students with perfect attendance will receive a 2-point bonus added to their final grade.  Class begins on time; students who are more than 5 minutes late will be marked absent.   Please refer to your lab syllabus for lab attendance, grading and lateness policies.

 

Extra Credit.  Students have the option of composing a research report consisting of revised Homeworks 1 and 3 plus Homework 4, an introduction and conclusion.  The report will earn a 3-point bonus and will constitute half of your homework grade (that is, 25% of your final grade.)  This is an opportunity to revise and improve your work.  Do not choose this option unless you intend to revise earlier homework submissions using instructor feedback.  Due date: May 4, in class.  No late reports are accepted.

 

Email.  When you email the course instructors, list the course number on the message line (Soc317M). This will prevent deletion by spam filters. Compose all emails to instructors using correct business correspondence format; see course BB posting for assistance.   We do not accept text messages.

 

 

            The University complies with the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act. 

Please contact the Dean of Students Office, Services for Students with Disabilities for more information. 

SOC 333K • Sociology Of Gender

46425 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 930-1100 BUR 212
show description

SOC 333K/WGS 322 (46425/48370), Spring 2010            Instructor:   Dr. Susan Marshall

TA: Janelle Guillory    Office:      Weds. 1 – 3, Burdine 514

Office Hours: Tues. 11-1, Burdine 6th floor      Phone:        232-6318

e-mail: JMGuillory@mail.utexas.edu      e-mail:       sem@mail.utexas.edu

 

SYLLABUS: SOCIOLOGY OF GENDER

 

 Most of the required readings for this course are contained within the following three books:

        1. ANDERSEN.  Thinking about Women, 8th ed.  2009.  (paper)

2. COHEN.  Men and Masculinity: A Text Reader.  2001.  (paper)

  3. STONE and McKEE.  Gender and Culture in America, 3rd ed.  2007.   (paper)

 

We will use Blackboard to post exam questions, grades, and other course information.  Only students who have registered an email address have access to this site.  To register an email address or to change your email address, go to: www.utexas.edu/cc/blackboard/tutorials/index.html.  See “For Students,” “Changing Your Email Address.”  Check your access early in the semester and contact us if you have problems.  Instructors cannot post grades to unlisted (JDoe) accounts.

 

 

I.            CONCEPTUALIZING GENDER INEQUALITY  (Jan. 19 – 28)

                        Andersen: Chapters 1, 8 (to p. 253); also pp. 27-33

                        Cohen:  Articles 2, 3

 

II.            SOURCES  OF  GENDER  DIFFERENTIATION

            A.            BIOLOGY  (Feb. 2)

                        Andersen: pp. 21-27, 87-90, 199-215

 

            B.            SOCIAL  EVOLUTION  (Feb. 4 - 11)

                        Cohen:  Article 5

                        Stone and McKee, Chapters 2, 3 (to p. 70)

 

            C.            SOCIALIZATION  (Feb. 11 - 18)

                        Andersen: pp. 33-50, 54-72; Chapter 10 (to p. 312)

                        Cohen:  Articles 6, 7

 

****************MIDTERM EXAM #1  *************** TUESDAY, Feb. 23  *********

 

III.            THE COSTS  OF  INEQUALITY:  RESOURCES &  RELATIONSHIPS

 A.  FRIENDSHIP  AND  SEXUALITY  (Feb. 25 -  March 2)

                                    Andersen, Chapter 4; also pp. 189-91

                                    Cohen: Articles 11, 13, 30

                                    Stone and McKee, Chapter 4

 

 B.  MARRIAGE  AND  PARENTING  (March 4 - 11)

                                    Andersen: pp. 153-78

                                    Cohen: Articles 16, 18, 20, 21

                                    Stone and McKee, Chapter 8

 

  C.   WORK  (March 23 - 30)

                                    Andersen: Chapter 5; also pp. 191-94

                                    Cohen:  Articles 26, 28

 

 

            **************** MIDTERM EXAM #2  ***************** THURSDAY, April 1 *********

IV.            GENDER  AND  SOCIETY

 

            A.                        AMERICAN  INSTITUTIONS  AND  CULTURE  (April 6 - 13)

                                    Andersen: Chapter 9; also pp. 184-89, 321-40

                                    Cohen:  Articles 22, 35

 

            B.                        CULTURAL DIVERSITY  (April 15 - 20)

    Andersen: pp. 178-84

                                    Cohen:  Articles 4, 29

                                    Stone and McKee: Chapters 5, 6

            C.                        MOVEMENTS  FOR  CHANGE  (April 22 – May 4)

                                    Andersen: Chapter 12; also pp. 215-21; 250-56; 341-51

                                    Cohen:  Articles 38, 41

                                    Stone and McKee:  Chapter 7; also pp. 71-85, 239-44

 

 

***************MIDTERM EXAM #3  ***************  THURSDAY, May 6  *********

 

GRADING POLICY

         There are a total of four exams for this course:  three midterm exams and a cumulative final exam held during the exam period.  Your course grade is based upon your top three exam scores.  There are no make-up exams.  If you miss an exam, you must take the cumulative final exam to pass the course.  The final exam is optional for students who take all three midterm exams; it is an opportunity to improve your course grade.

         Please note:  If you miss an exam, you will be scored a 0.  University policy permits Q-drops only for students with a current grade of C or better, and students who miss exams will not be given Q-drops by this instructor.  You can drop this course by Feb. 15 without an academic penalty.  You can change your grade status to or from Pass/Fail until March 29.

         Midterm exam contents include true-false and multiple-choice items and a take-home essay posted on the class Blackboard.  The optional cumulative final exam has no essays.  Students have two weeks after exams are returned to question their exam grade during office hours of the T.A. or the instructor.

         There are no extra-credit provisions for this course.  All grades are based on test scores.

         No curves are applied to individual exam scores.  A curve may be applied to assign final grades at the end of the semester.  This final grade adjustment will never be lower than standard grade cut-off (60, 70, 80, 90).  Students are cautioned not to rely on curves in this course. 

 

ATTENDANCE POLICY.  Students are expected to attend class and will be held accountable for all lecture material.  Neither the instructor nor the TA will provide class notes to absent students.   Absent students should check the class Blackboard site for important announcements. 

         Please turn off cell phones during class time.  You are welcome to use your laptops, but this privilege will be revoked if used for other purposes than class note-taking.

 

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY.   In accordance with University policy and the student-initiated Honor Code, students may not confer after distribution of the take-home essay.  Violators will receive no credit for the essay and may be referred to the Dean of Students office for further disciplinary action.

 

CONTACTING US. If you e-mail the course instructors, please use correct business format as posted on the course blackboard.  To prevent deletion of your message by spam filters, list the course number (Soc333) as the subject.  We cannot accept text messages.

 

FINAL EXAM.  Thursday, May 13, 9 am.  There are no alternate dates for the optional final exam. 

Please make your plans accordingly.

 

              The University of Texas at Austin complies with the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act.  The instructor will make appropriate accommodations for students requiring a different testing environment.  Students needing such accommodations are encouraged to contact the Dean of Students Office, Services for Students with Disabilities.  

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