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Christine L. Williams, Chair CLA 3.306, Mailcode A1700, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-232-6300

Mary Rose

Ph.D., Duke University

Associate Professor
Mary Rose

Contact

Biography

Mary Rose received an A.B. in Psychology from Stanford University and a Ph.D. in social psychology from Duke University.  Formerly a research fellow at the American Bar Foundation, she is currently an associate professor of sociology and law at the University of Texas at Austin, where she teaches courses on social science and law as well as social psychology and research methods.  Her research examines lay participation in the legal system and perceptions of justice, and she has written on a variety of topics including the effects of jury selection practices on jury representativeness and citizens’ views of justice, jury trial innovations, civil damage awards, and public views of court practices.  She is also an investigator on the landmark study of decision making among 50 deliberating juries from Pima County, Arizona.  She has served on the editorial boards of Law & Social Inquiry, Law & Society Review and is a former trustee of the Law & Society Association.  In 2005, her research on the peremptory challenge was cited in the U.S. Supreme Court decision, Miller-el v. Dretke (Breyer, J., concurring) and her work on punitive damages was cited in the 2008 decision Exxon Shipping Co. v. Baker.

Interests

Juries and Jury Decision Making, Empirical Analysis of the Law, Social Psychology

SOC 330P • Sociology & Social Psychology

46240 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am JGB 2.324
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Course Description

This course is designed to give you a broad introduction to the field of social psychology, a topic that is investigated in both psychology and sociology departments. I have three aims for the course: (1) I want to provide you with an overview of the field of social psychology; (2) I want to introduce you to the various research methodologies that social psychologists use to investigate a phenomenon empirically; and (3) I want you to be able to spot applications to the “real world” of the material we discuss. Students enrolled in this course should have upper division standing, and, ideally, they should have taken courses in either sociology or psychology. This course is not cross-listed with psychology, which means that it does not count towards the requirements for a degree in psychology (but of course you still get credit for it as an upper-division sociology course). 

Even in a class of this size, I will occasionally call on people and ask them to give me their understanding of a topic we are discussing. Although I do not restrict lecture topics to what appears in the text, the most effective discussions – and the way for you to get the most out of this class in general – is to do your readings prior to the class for which they are assigned. This will help you immensely with lectures and ultimately with the tests. 

Texts

John D. DeLamater, & Daniel J. Myers, Social Psychology (7th edition). Thompson/Wadsworth (2010). [PLEASE NOTE: This version of the book is a restructured one; do not rely solely on older editions without a close comparison to the 7th] 

Grading

Final grades are based on three exams, in-class exercises, and a brief writing assignment. 

SOC 398T • Supv Teaching In Sociology

46485 • Fall 2014
Meets M 300pm-600pm CLA 2.606
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Description

This seminar is a requirement for graduate students who aim to become assistant instructors (AI’s) in the sociology department, and it is encouraged for any student who works as a teaching assistant, especially when TA’s must manage students in discussion sections or other instructional capacities. A main goal is to discuss different philosophies on teaching, strategies for managing a classroom, and to have a forum to review and brainstorm about the challenges that come up in college-level courses. You will engage in hands-on learning activities, such as designing a syllabus and giving a short lecture in front of others. In additional to being a source to discuss good teaching, the seminar will also cover other types of professional expectations for those interested in a career in academia, including the demands of scholarly research, networking, giving talks about research, and securing funding. We adopt a “professionalization seminar” (“pro-sem”) model, and the class is designed as an opportunity to learn about the field of academic sociology and clarify your professional interests. Course is designed to be CR/NC (if that status is not automatically assigned, please ensure you select it as your preference). There is one required text for this course and supplemental readings will be posted online as needed.

SOC 336P • Social Psychology And The Law

46470 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm WEL 1.308
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Description:

Social psychologists ask questions about how people perceive, construct, and respond to the social world.  This course focuses on how views of self are shaped by one’s position in society and also on how small changes in people’s immediate environment – for example, adding more people to a group, the presence of an authority figure, taking small steps to convince you to buy a product, or having someone encourage you to think of yourself in a different light – can produce quite dramatic changes in behavior.  Social psychology within sociology approaches such questions in multiple ways, including through laboratory experiments, surveys, observation, and interviews.  This course reviews topics in social psychology by considering, whenever possible, a variety of perspectives.  Topics to be explored include:  views of the self and impressions of others; attitudes and attitude change; prejudice; social influence; and behavior in groups.  In addition, the class will study several areas in which principles of social psychology are applied to real-world problems.  

Grading:

Final grades are based on three exams and short in-class exercises.

SOC 396N • Intro To Law And Society

46675 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 215pm-330pm TNH 3.129
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LAW 397/SOC 396N

Although much valuable knowledge about the legal system comes from the field of criminology, there are several other ways to understand law without (necessarily) asking questions about crime.  This course is designed to review how social science researchers have studied the general field of “law and society,” which encompasses the development and activities of law, and the behavior legal institutions and legal actors.  Each week, we will examine samples of law and society research to understand how social influences affect legal decision-making and the structure of institutions, as well as how the law affects decision-making in everyday life.  Broad social theories will be examined in legal settings, for example: how the sociology of the professions has been used to study attorneys; the ways in which social structure influences decisions in legal domains; the extent to which theories of social movements apply to use of the courts; as well as how theories of social psychological processes apply to disputes and legal decision-making.  Students will be evaluated through written assignments and are encouraged to consider how to design original research in the field of law and society.  Graduate standing required.

SOC 330P • Sociology & Social Psychology

46210 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am GAR 0.102
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Course Description

This course is designed to give you a broad introduction to the field of social psychology, a topic that is investigated in both psychology and sociology departments. I have three aims for the course: (1) I want to provide you with an overview of the field of social psychology; (2) I want to introduce you to the various research methodologies that social psychologists use to investigate a phenomenon empirically; and (3) I want you to be able to spot applications to the “real world” of the material we discuss. Students enrolled in this course should have upper division standing, and, ideally, they should have taken courses in either sociology or psychology. This course is not cross-listed with psychology, which means that it does not count towards the requirements for a degree in psychology (but of course you still get credit for it as an upper-division sociology course). 

Even in a class of this size, I will occasionally call on people and ask them to give me their understanding of a topic we are discussing. Although I do not restrict lecture topics to what appears in the text, the most effective discussions – and the way for you to get the most out of this class in general – is to do your readings prior to the class for which they are assigned. This will help you immensely with lectures and ultimately with the tests. 

Texts

John D. DeLamater, & Daniel J. Myers, Social Psychology (7th edition). Thompson/Wadsworth (2010). [PLEASE NOTE: This version of the book is a restructured one; do not rely solely on older editions without a close comparison to the 7th] 

Grading

Final grades are based on three exams, in-class exercises, and a brief writing assignment. 

SOC 398T • Supv Teaching In Sociology

46450 • Fall 2013
Meets M 300pm-600pm CLA 3.106
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Description

This seminar is a requirement for graduate students who aim to become assistant instructors (AI’s) in the sociology department, and it is encouraged for any student who works as a teaching assistant, especially when TA’s must manage students in discussion sections or other instructional capacities. A main goal is to discuss different philosophies on teaching, strategies for managing a classroom, and to have a forum to review and brainstorm about the challenges that come up in college-level courses. You will engage in hands-on learning activities, such as designing a syllabus and giving a short lecture in front of others. In additional to being a source to discuss good teaching, the seminar will also cover other types of professional expectations for those interested in a career in academia, including the demands of scholarly research, networking, giving talks about research, and securing funding. We adopt a “professionalization seminar” (“pro-sem”) model, and the class is designed as an opportunity to learn about the field of academic sociology and clarify your professional interests. Course is designed to be CR/NC (if that status is not automatically assigned, please ensure you select it as your preference). There is one required text for this course and supplemental readings will be posted online as needed.

SOC 336P • Social Psychology And The Law

45825 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm GAR 0.102
show description

Description:

Social psychologists ask questions about how people perceive, construct, and respond to the social world.  This course focuses on how views of self are shaped by one’s position in society and also on how small changes in people’s immediate environment – for example, adding more people to a group, the presence of an authority figure, taking small steps to convince you to buy a product, or having someone encourage you to think of yourself in a different light – can produce quite dramatic changes in behavior.  Social psychology within sociology approaches such questions in multiple ways, including through laboratory experiments, surveys, observation, and interviews.  This course reviews topics in social psychology by considering, whenever possible, a variety of perspectives.  Topics to be explored include:  views of the self and impressions of others; attitudes and attitude change; prejudice; social influence; and behavior in groups.  In addition, the class will study several areas in which principles of social psychology are applied to real-world problems.  

Grading:

Final grades are based on three exams and short in-class exercises.

SOC 330P • Sociology & Social Psychology

45585 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am CMA A2.320
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 Course Description

 

 This course is designed to give you a broad introduction to the field of social psychology, a topic that is investigated in both psychology and sociology departments. I have three aims for the course: (1) I want to provide you with an overview of the field of social psychology; (2) I want to introduce you to the various research methodologies that social psychologists use to investigate a phenomenon empirically; and (3) I want you to be able to spot applications to the “real world” of the material we discuss. Students enrolled in this course should have upper division standing, and, ideally, they should have taken courses in either sociology or psychology. This course is not cross-listed with psychology, which means that it does not count towards the requirements for a degree in psychology (but of course you still get credit for it as an upper-division sociology course). 

Even in a class of this size, I will occasionally call on people and ask them to give me their understanding of a topic we are discussing. Although I do not restrict lecture topics to what appears in the text, the most effective discussions – and the way for you to get the most out of this class in general – is to do your readings prior to the class for which they are assigned. This will help you immensely with lectures and ultimately with the tests. 

Texts

John D. DeLamater, & Daniel J. Myers, Social Psychology (7th edition). Thompson/Wadsworth (2010). [PLEASE NOTE: This version of the book is a restructured one; do not rely solely on older editions without a close comparison to the 7th] 

Grading

Final grades are based on three exams, in-class exercises, and a brief writing assignment. 

SOC 398T • Supv Teaching In Sociology

45820 • Fall 2012
Meets M 300pm-600pm BUR 214
show description

Description

This seminar is a requirement for graduate students who aim to become assistant instructors (AI’s) in the sociology department, and it is encouraged for any student who works as a teaching assistant, especially when TA’s must manage students in discussion sections or other instructional capacities. A main goal is to discuss different philosophies on teaching, strategies for managing a classroom, and to have a forum to review and brainstorm about the challenges that come up in college-level courses. You will engage in hands-on learning activities, such as designing a syllabus and giving a short lecture in front of others. In additional to being a source to discuss good teaching, the seminar will also cover other types of professional expectations for those interested in a career in academia, including the demands of scholarly research, networking, giving talks about research, and securing funding. We adopt a “professionalization seminar” (“pro-sem”) model, and the class is designed as an opportunity to learn about the field of academic sociology and clarify your professional interests. Course is designed to be CR/NC (if that status is not automatically assigned, please ensure you select it as your preference). There is one required text for this course and supplemental readings will be posted online as needed.

SOC 336P • Social Psychology And The Law

45610 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm PAI 3.02
show description

Social psychologists ask questions about how people perceive, construct, and respond to the social world.  This course focuses on how views of self are shaped by one’s position in society and also on how small changes in people’s immediate environment – for example, adding more people to a group, the presence of an authority figure, taking small steps to convince you to buy a product, or having someone encourage you to think of yourself in a different light – can produce quite dramatic changes in behavior.  Social psychology within sociology approaches such questions in multiple ways, including through laboratory experiments, surveys, observation, and interviews.  This course reviews topics in social psychology by considering, whenever possible, a variety of perspectives.  Topics to be explored include:  views of the self and impressions of others; attitudes and attitude change; prejudice; social influence; and behavior in groups.  In addition, the class will study several areas in which principles of social psychology are applied to real-world problems.  

Grading:

Final grades are based on three exams and short in-class exercises.

SOC 330P • Sociology & Social Psychology

45415 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am CPE 2.208
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Description:         

Social psychologists ask questions about how people perceive, construct, and respond to the social world.  This course focuses on how views of self are shaped by one’s position in society and also on how small changes in people’s immediate environment – for example, adding more people to a group, the presence of an authority figure, taking small steps to convince you to buy a product, or having someone encourage you to think of yourself in a different light – can produce quite dramatic changes in behavior.  Social psychology within sociology approaches such questions in multiple ways, including through laboratory experiments, surveys, observation, and interviews.  This course reviews topics in social psychology by considering, whenever possible, a variety of perspectives.  Topics to be explored include:  views of the self and impressions of others; attitudes and attitude change; prejudice; social influence; and behavior in groups.  In addition, the class will study several areas in which principles of social psychology are applied to real-world problems.  

Grading:

Final grades are based on three exams and short in-class exercises.

SOC 398T • Supv Teaching In Sociology

45660 • Fall 2011
Meets M 300pm-600pm BUR 214
show description

This seminar is a requirement for graduate students who are employed as teaching assistants and assistant instructors in the sociology department. Its goal is to prepare students for the professional rewards and challenges of a career in academia. The first portion of the course will address professionalization issues, dedicated to discussing the broader career issues that sociology professors face. This seminar will discuss topics, issues, and concerns Ph.D. students face as part of their academic and professional training, including but not limited to their actual experiences in graduate school to publishing and getting a job as a professional sociologist.The second portion of the course is focused on teaching preparation. This part of the course will prepare the students to develop a teaching portfolio. It will address teaching philosophy, designing a course syllabus, teaching strategies and techniques, student assessment, and student interactions.

SOC 336P • Social Psychology And The Law

46160 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 930am-1100am PAI 3.02
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COURSE DESCRIPTION

            This course is designed to give you a broad introduction to how and when social science research, especially that from social psychology, is focused on and used by the legal system.  I have three aims for the course: (1) I want to deepen your understanding of the legal system; (2) I want you to understand what types of legal issues make use of social science and which research methods are used to investigate law and social science questions; and (3) I want you to be able to describe the research and findings to others and to be able to apply your knowledge to other areas.  Our primary focus will be on the use of social science by the courts; however, we will also discuss research into other legal areas, such as police procedures and how social science influences (and is influenced by) larger legal policy issues.  Students enrolled in this course should have upper division standing (see me if you do not!), and, ideally, they should have taken courses in either sociology or psychology. 

 

            Although this is a lecture course, I will encourage discussion.  Although I do not restrict lecture topics to what appears in the text, the most effective discussions – and the way for you to get the most out of this class in general – is to do your readings prior to the class for which they are assigned.  

 

REQUIRED TEXT

            Murray Levine, Leah Wallach & David Levine, Psychological Problems, Social Issues, and Law. Boston: Allyn & Bacon (2006).

 

EXAMS AND GRADING

            Your final grade will be determined by five components, three exams (worth 100 points per test), a short paper (worth 40 points), and participation in various in-class activities (worth 10 points total). 

 

            Exams.  The dates for the exams are listed below in the ‘Schedule of Readings.’  Exams will be a mixture of multiple choice questions and short answer/fill-in’s. 

 

                        Disability Accommodations.  Accommodations are available for students with documented disabilities.  To determine if you qualify as having a disability, please contact the Dean of Students at 471-6259; 471-4641 (TTY).  If they certify your needs, we will work together to make appropriate arrangements.

 

                        Make-up’s Make-up exams are available ONLY to those who (1) have a valid excuse (typically medically-related; in all cases verifiable); and (2) have contacted me PRIOR to the test to notify me of their circumstances and to receive permission to make up the exam.  (Read that last sentence again, because I really mean it).  Failure to contact me in advance or failure to have a verifiable conflict with the exam will result in a zero for that test.  Make-up exams may not necessarily be in the same format as the original exam.  All persons taking the make-up will sit for the test at a pre-determined time, preferably during the exam week (if possible).  Time slots allocated for make-up’s for this semester will be posted on Blackboard when available.

 

                        Final Exam.  Although the final exam is held during the finals period, the last exam is NOT cumulative.  It will be roughly the same length (in terms of time) and roughly the same format as the first two tests.  Please note that this exam is being held during the finals period in the hopes of benefiting you (i.e., as an effort to cut down on the number of tests and assignments you have during the last week of classes).  There are undoubtedly some of you who would like to be completely finished with this course prior to the scheduled final (so would I!); however, such wishes are not valid reasons to request a change in time for the final.  For a TINY FRACTION of people in this class, there may be pre-existing conflicts with the final.  An example might be if you have, right now in January, purchased airline tickets that cannot be changed.  I will entertain a request for a change in the final time for that type of limited circumstance.  Otherwise, consider yourself on notice that you have a final exam, which is currently scheduled for Thursday, May 13th at 9 AM.  Do not make plans that would conflict with this or any other test

 

 

            Short paper.  Forty points toward your grade comes from a short (under 4 pages) paper, which will discuss your reactions to a single case.   You should consider attendance MANDATORY on that day.  Failure to attend will result in 20 points being deducted from the total, and you will find it nearly impossible to complete the assignment without attending.  I will not schedule make-up’s for people who miss the film for no verifiable reason (see note above on make up policy for exams).  This exercise is intended for you to consider issues that arise in jury decision-making.  More detailed instructions regarding the structure of the assignment will be provided.  Late papers will be reduced one full grade for each day they are late, up to two grades (then it is an automatic 0 for the entire assignment).  I DO NOT accept emailed papers. 

 

            In-class exercises.  Finally, ten points toward your grade will come from small in-class assignments (e.g., filling out questionnaires).  I do not announce the days for these assignments in advance, and there are no make-ups

 

Total points possible in this course: 350.  Final grades are determined by the percentage of total points you accrue, with minimum values for each grade as follows:

 

325 (93%)

  A

305 (87%)

  B+

270 (77%)

  C+

235 (67%)

  D+

315 (90%)

  A-

290 (83%)

  B

255 (73%)

  C

220 (63%)

  D

 

 

280 (80%)

  B-

245 (70%)

  C-

210 (60%)

  D-

 

Do not request adjustments for being “close.”  With respect to any individual test or paper grade, I will entertain requests for regrades, but such requests must (1) be in writing, with specific descriptions of what part of the test grading you believe was incorrect and why; and (2) must occur within two weeks of grades being posted.  Always see your TA to go over your answers on the test prior to contacting me about a regrade.

 

                        Religious holidays.  If you must miss an examination or class assignment due to observance of a religious holy day, you will be given an opportunity to complete the work missed within a reasonable time after the absence, provided that you have properly notified me.  The University of Texas at Austin requires that a student notify me at least 14 days prior to the classes scheduled on dates that the student will be absent to observe a religious holy day.  (For 

religious holidays falling within the first two weeks of the semester, notice should be given on the first day of the semester).  You will not be penalized for excused absences based on religious holidays, but you are required to make up any exams or other work within a reasonable time after the absence. 

 

 

MISCELLANEOUS

This is intended as an upper division course.  People with fewer than 60 credit hours must see me for permission to remain in the class (which is typically given to people who are close to completing 60 hours).  Otherwise, if a “1” or a “2” appears next to your name on the course roster, you will be dropped.

 

This class does not count towards the requirements of a psychology major.

 

Your enrollment in this course signifies your acceptance of these policies.  Fairness requires consistency in application of rules.  Do not seek exceptions to the rules or grading policies I have outlined.  

SOC 330P • Sociology & Social Psychology

45570 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am JGB 2.324
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Description

Crimes, trials, evidence, juries, sentences, accidents, lawsuits - you hear a lot about issues with which the legal system concerns itself. In this course, we review how social scientists, particularly social psychologists, have examined the legal system and, in turn, how the courts do (or do not) make use of social science information as part of their decision making and reforms. The goal of the course is to learn how social science information gets applied to real world problems in the legal system. A sample of areas to be covered include: predicting dangerousness, eyewitness testimony, mental health issues in the law (e.g., the insanity defense), children in the law, and jury decision-making on verdicts in criminal and civil cases.

Grading Policy
One short writing assignment along with three exams.


SOC 396N • Introduction To Law & Society

45815 • Fall 2010
Meets W 1200pm-300pm TNH 3.115
show description

LAW 397M


Although much valuable knowledge about the legal system comes from the field of criminology, there are several other ways to understand law without (necessarily) asking questions about crime.  This course is designed to review how social science researchers have studied the general field of “law and society,” which encompasses the development and activities of law, and the behavior legal institutions and legal actors.  Each week, we will examine samples of law and society research to understand how social influences affect legal decision-making and the structure of institutions, as well as how the law affects decision-making in everyday life.  Broad social theories will be examined in legal settings, for example: how the sociology of the professions has been used to study attorneys; the ways in which social structure influences decisions in legal domains; the extent to which theories of social movements apply to use of the courts; as well as how theories of social psychological processes apply to disputes and legal decision-making.  Students will be evaluated through written assignments and are encouraged to consider how to design original research in the field of law and society.  Graduate standing required.

SOC 398T • Supv Teaching In Sociology

45835 • Fall 2010
Meets M 300pm-600pm BUR 214
show description


This seminar is a requirement for graduate students who are employed as teaching assistants and assistant instructors in the sociology department. Its goal is to prepare students for the professional rewards and challenges of a career in academia. The first portion of the course will address professionalization issues, dedicated to discussing the broader career issues that sociology professors face. This seminar will discuss topics, issues, and concerns Ph.D. students face as part of their academic and professional training, including but not limited to their actual experiences in graduate school to publishing and getting a job as a professional sociologist.

The second portion of the course is focused on teaching preparation. This part of the course will prepare the students to develop a teaching portfolio. It will address teaching philosophy, designing a course syllabus, teaching strategies and techniques, student assessment, and student interactions.


SOC 336P • Social Psychology And The Law

46440 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 930-1100 CMA A2.320
show description

See enclosed document

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