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Michael Stoff, Director 305 East 23rd St, CLA 2.102, (G3600) Austin, TX 78712-1250 • 512-471-1442

Thomas A Bay

Other faculty PHD

Adjunct Professor

Contact

Biography

Austin Bay is an author and a nationally syndicated newspaper columnist. His latest book is a biography of Turkey's Kemal Ataturk (Palgrave/Macmillan 2011). He is the author of three novels and several non-fiction books, and is a contributing editor at StrategyPage.com. He has a doctorate in English and Comparative Literature from Columbia University. Bay is a colonel (retired) in the US Army Reserve. In the 1970's he served in Germany with the 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment and 1st Infantry Division.  In 1991 he served on active duty during Operation Desert Storm; in 2004 he served in Iraq as a plans officer. For four years (1989-93) Bay worked as a special consultant in strategic wargaming in the Office of the Secretary of Defense.  Bay is a graduate of the US Army Command and General Staff School and the US Army War College.  He is also actively involved in developmental aid projects (primarily in East Africa) with the Episcopal Church. His other interests include jazz piano and yoga.

T C 357 • War Games: Military Creativity

43465 • Fall 2014
Meets W 200pm-500pm CRD 007B
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Instructor: Thomas Austin Bay, PHD, Adjunct Professor, Plan II Honors Program

 

Description:

This course surveys historical ideas, concepts, thoughts, theories, speculations, philosophies, and ruminations about military strategy. Strategy, identifying goals and creating policies to achieve those goals involves gathering information, weighing needs and desires, determining capabilities and assets, assessing possible futures, and then formulating a plan. This is strategic intelligence collection, strategic analysis, and strategic planning. Actually doing it is applied strategy, or operations (in other words, acting in the real world). The course will help students learn to assess large-scale real world issues and then tackle the truly big issue: What can we do besides gripe about them?

 

Readings:

Chaliand (ed.), The Art of War in World History

Delbruck, Warfare in Antiquity

Machiavelli, The Prince

LeBlanc and Register, Constant Battles

von Clausewitz, On War

Huntington, Clash of Civilizations

Van Creveld, War and Technology

Dunnigan, Complete Wargames Handbook

Porter, War and the Rise of the State

 

Requirements:

35% - Short Essays – 2/3 pages each (5 % each)

25% - Term Paper – 10/15 pages

10% - Term Paper Presentation

10% - Mid-Term Exam

10% - Seminar participation throughout the semester

10% - Play and evaluate a historical wargames

 

About the Professor:

Austin Bay is an author and a nationally syndicated newspaper columnist. His latest book is a biography of Turkey's Kemal Ataturk (Palgrave/Macmillan 2011). He is the author of three novels and several non-fiction books, and is a contributing editor at StrategyPage.com. He has a doctorate in English and Comparative Literature from Columbia University. Bay is a colonel (retired) in the US Army Reserve. In the 1970's he served in Germany with the 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment and 1st Infantry Division.  In 1991 he served on active duty during Operation Desert Storm; in 2004 he served in Iraq as a plans officer. For four years (1989-93) Bay worked as a special consultant in strategic wargaming in the Office of the Secretary of Defense.  Bay is a graduate of the US Army Command and General Staff School and the US Army War College.  He is also actively involved in developmental aid projects (primarily in East Africa) with the Episcopal Church. His other interests include jazz piano and yoga.

 

T C 357 • War Games: Strategy/Strat Thry

43795 • Spring 2014
Meets W 200pm-500pm CRD 007B
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Description:

This course surveys historical ideas, concepts, thoughts, theories, speculations, philosophies, and ruminations about military strategy. Strategy, identifying goals and creating policies to achieve those goals involves gathering information, weighing needs and desires, determining capabilities and assets, assessing possible futures, and then formulating a plan. This is strategic intelligence collection, strategic analysis, and strategic planning. Actually doing it is applied strategy, or operations (in other words, acting in the real world). The course will help students learn to assess large-scale real world issues and then tackle the truly big issue: What can we do besides gripe about them?

 

Readings:

Chaliand (ed.), The Art of War in World History

Delbruck, Warfare in Antiquity

Machiavelli, The Prince

LeBlanc and Register, Constant Battles

von Clausewitz, On War

Huntington, Clash of Civilizations

Van Creveld, War and Technology

Dunnigan, Complete Wargames Handbook

Porter, War and the Rise of the State

 

Requirements:

35% - Short Essays – 2/3 pages each (5 % each)

25% - Term Paper – 10/15 pages

10% - Term Paper Presentation

10% - Mid-Term Exam

10% - Seminar participation throughout the semester

10% - Play and evaluate a historical wargames

 

About the Professor:

Austin Bay is an author and a nationally syndicated newspaper columnist. His latest book is a biography of Turkey's Kemal Ataturk (Palgrave/Macmillan 2011). He is the author of three novels and several non-fiction books, and is a contributing editor at StrategyPage.com. He has a doctorate in English and Comparative Literature from Columbia University. Bay is a colonel (retired) in the US Army Reserve. In the 1970's he served in Germany with the 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment and 1st Infantry Division.  In 1991 he served on active duty during Operation Desert Storm; in 2004 he served in Iraq as a plans officer. For four years (1989-93) Bay worked as a special consultant in strategic wargaming in the Office of the Secretary of Defense.  Bay is a graduate of the US Army Command and General Staff School and the US Army War College.  He is also actively involved in developmental aid projects (primarily in East Africa) with the Episcopal Church. His other interests include jazz piano and yoga.

 

 

T C 357 • War Games: Strategy/Strat Thry

43145 • Spring 2013
Meets W 200pm-500pm CRD 007B
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War Games: Military Creativity, Military Intelligence, and the Formulation of Strategy

Description:

This course surveys historical ideas, concepts, thoughts, theories, speculations, philosophies, and ruminations about military strategy. Strategy, identifying goals and creating policies to achieve those goals involves gathering information, weighing needs and desires, determining capabilities and assets, assessing possible futures, and then formulating a plan. This is strategic intelligence collection, strategic analysis, and strategic planning. Actually doing it is applied strategy, or operations (in other words, acting in the real world). The course will help students learn to assess large-scale real world issues and then tackle the truly big issue: What can we do besides gripe about them?

 

Readings:

Chaliand (ed.), The Art of War in World History

Delbruck, Warfare in Antiquity

Machiavelli, The Prince

LeBlanc and Register, Constant Battles

von Clausewitz, On War

Huntington, Clash of Civilizations

Van Creveld, War and Technology

Dunnigan, Complete Wargames Handbook

Porter, War and the Rise of the State

 

Requirements:

35% - Short Essays – 2/3 pages each (5 % each)

25% - Term Paper – 10/15 pages

10% - Term Paper Presentation

10% - Mid-Term Exam

10% - Seminar participation throughout the semester

10% - Play and evaluate a historical wargames

 

About the Professor:

Austin Bay is an author and a nationally syndicated newspaper columnist. His latest book is a biography of Turkey's Kemal Ataturk (Palgrave/Macmillan 2011). He is the author of three novels and several non-fiction books, and is a contributing editor at StrategyPage.com. He has a doctorate in English and Comparative Literature from Columbia University. Bay is a colonel (retired) in the US Army Reserve. In the 1970's he served in Germany with the 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment and 1st Infantry Division.  In 1991 he served on active duty during Operation Desert Storm; in 2004 he served in Iraq as a plans officer. For four years (1989-93) Bay worked as a special consultant in strategic wargaming in the Office of the Secretary of Defense.  Bay is a graduate of the US Army Command and General Staff School and the US Army War College.  He is also actively involved in developmental aid projects (primarily in East Africa) with the Episcopal Church. His other interests include jazz piano and yoga.

 

 

 

 

T C 357 • War Games: Military Creativity

42990 • Spring 2012
Meets W 200pm-500pm CRD 007B
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Description:

This course surveys historical ideas, concepts, thoughts, theories, speculations, philosophies, and ruminations about military strategy. Strategy, identifying goals and creating policies to achieve those goals involves gathering information, weighing needs and desires, determining capabilities and assets, assessing possible futures, and then formulating a plan. This is strategic intelligence collection, strategic analysis, and strategic planning. Actually doing it is applied strategy, or operations (in other words, acting in the real world). The course will help students learn to assess large-scale real world issues and then tackle the truly big issue: What can we do besides gripe about them?

 

Readings:

Chaliand (ed.), The Art of War in World History

Delbruck, Warfare in Antiquity

Machiavelli, The Prince

LeBlanc and Register, Constant Battles

von Clausewitz, On War

Huntington, Clash of Civilizations

Van Creveld, War and Technology

Dunnigan, Complete Wargames Handbook

Porter, War and the Rise of the State

 

Requirements:

35% - Short Essays – 2/3 pages each (5 % each)

25% - Term Paper – 10/15 pages

10% - Term Paper Presentation

10% - Mid-Term Exam

10% - Seminar participation throughout the semester

10% - Play and evaluate a historical wargames

 

About the Professor:

Austin Bay is an author and a nationally syndicated newspaper columnist. His latest book is a biography of Turkey's Kemal Ataturk (Palgrave/Macmillan 2011). He is the author of three novels and several non-fiction books, and is a contributing editor at StrategyPage.com. He has a doctorate in English and Comparative Literature from Columbia University. Bay is a colonel (retired) in the US Army Reserve. In the 1970's he served in Germany with the 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment and 1st Infantry Division.  In 1991 he served on active duty during Operation Desert Storm; in 2004 he served in Iraq as a plans officer. For four years (1989-93) Bay worked as a special consultant in strategic wargaming in the Office of the Secretary of Defense.  Bay is a graduate of the US Army Command and General Staff School and the US Army War College.  He is also actively involved in developmental aid projects (primarily in East Africa) with the Episcopal Church. His other interests include jazz piano and yoga.

 

 

 

T C 357 • War Games: Military Creativity

43490 • Spring 2011
Meets W 200pm-500pm CRD 007B
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Description:

This is not a military history course. Rather, this course surveys historical ideas, concepts, thoughts, theories, speculations, philosophies, and ruminations about military strategy. Strategy, identifying goals and creating policies to achieve those goals involves gathering information, weighing needs and desires, determining capabilities and assets, assessing possible futures, and then formulating a plan. This is strategic intelligence collection, strategic analysis, and strategic planning. Actually doing it is applied strategy, or operations: acting in the real world. This course will help students learn to assess large-scale real world issues and then tackle the truly big issue: What can we do besides gripe about them?

 

Readings:

Chaliand (ed.), The Art of War in World History

Delbruck, Warfare in Antiquity

Machiavelli, The Prince

LeBlanc and Register, Constant Battles

von Clausewitz, On War

Huntington, Clash of Civilizations

Van Creveld, War and Technology

Dunnigan, Complete Wargames Handbook

Porter, War and the Rise of the State

 

Requirements:

75% : Seminar discussion of weekly readings. Students are expected to discuss the readings and to analyze some specific strategic issues or military campaigns in light of the readings. This will include short weekly papers.

10% : One seminar presentation based on a term paper relating either to readings or a student-proposed topic approved by the instructor.

10% : Play and evaluate a historical wargame.

5% : Mid-term exam (short essay and reading identification).

 

About the Professor:

Austin Bay is an author and a nationally syndicated newspaper columnist.  His third novel, The Wrong Side of Brightness, was published in 2003 by Putnam/Jove.  Bay also appears as a foreign affairs commentator on National Public Radio’s Morning Edition program.  He has a doctorate in English and Comparative Literature from Columbia University.  Bay is a colonel in the US Army Reserve.  In the 1970’s he served in Germany with the 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment and 1st Infantry Division.  He served on active duty during Operation Desert Strom.  In October 2001 he served a special tour at US Central Command.  For four years (1989-93) Bay worked as a special consultant in strategic wargaming in the Office of the Secretary of Defense.  Bay is a graduate of the US Army Command and General Staff School and the US Army War College.  He is also actively involved in developmental aid projects, primarily in East Africa and Central America, with the Episcopal Church.  His other interests included his daughters’ basketball games, jazz piano, and yoga.

T C 357 • War Games: Military Creativ-W

43625 • Spring 2010
Meets W 200pm-500pm CRD 007B
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     Draft Reading Assignments, UT Plan 2 TC357 Spring 2010
    
Dr. Austin Bay
Course: The Formulation of Strategy-W (Spring 2010)
Time: Wednesday 2:00-5:00 pm Room:
Office hours: Wednesday 5:00 pm, Class Room
Home phone: (512) 328-9245
email: austinbay@austin.rr.com
website: www.austinbay.net
blog: www.austinbay.net/blog

Chal = The Art of War in World History, ed. G. Chaliand
QD4 = A Quick and Dirty Guide to War 4th Edition

READINGS NOTE: “The US Army War College Guide to Strategy” is published in your photocopied material. The photo-copied package IS NOT NUMBERED. The USAWC guide is numbered.

Students are expected to be prepared for class discussion every week, and are expected to participate in class discussion. Occasionally students will be assigned specific reading material or research material to discuss in class.

Grading: There are usually nine to ten papers assigned during the semester. There is a mid-term exam. The mid-term test grade counts as two papers. The term paper counts as two weekly papers. Students may rewrite a paper if the grade is a B or lower. The “rewrite grade” will split the difference between the rewrite grade and the original grade.

CLASS 1 (Jan 20): Discuss syllabus; Videotape: “SR-71: Silent Vigil" (Aviation Week); Class discussion: What do you do and how do you do it? (See writing assignment for next week)

CLASS 2 (Jan 27): Readings: “Toward An Understanding of Military Strategy” (Lykke); “Why is Strategy Difficult?” (Jablonsky); “A Primer in Strategy Development” (Dorff); “Warfare and Strategic Cultures in History” (Chal, 1); “Guerrilla Warfare” (Chal, 138). Class Discussion Readings:  Iran chapter, “A Quick and Dirty Guide to War”; Essay Assignment: What is strategy? (two students need to volunteer to send me their papers by email by Jan 25.)

CLASS 3 (Feb 3): Analytic essay workshop: Nov 21, 1991 DMN essay (Bay, also found in QD4); Constant Battles (LeBlanc and Register; pp. 1-230; pay particular attention to Chapters 2, 4 and 8; discuss “What is strategy?” papers; Class Discussion Readings: “Intelligence Apprehension” (Bay); Essay Assignment: What is peace? (two students need to volunteer to send me their papers by email by Jan 29)

CLASS 4 (Feb 10): Sun Tzu (pp 25-115); “China” section in Chaliand (Chal, pp 221-284); Kautilya (Chal, 287);  Xenophon (Chal 102-111). Essay Assignment: 300-350 words. Select one of Sun Tzu’s observations. Analyze it, react to it, give it context.

CLASS 5 (Feb 17): Arrian (Chal, pp 174-196); Warfare in Antiquity (Delbruck, pp 33-234); The Prince (Machiavelli, Chapter Four); Class Discussion Reading (tentative): “A fight for the future”(Bay). Essay Assignment TBD or “Did Alexander have a grand strategy?” This is a short paper.


CLASS 6 (Feb 24): Warfare in Antiquity (Delbruck, pp. 255-390); Polybius (Chal, 112); review concepts (if we didn’t get to Machiavelli Chapter Four we will discuss it this afternoon). Essay Assignment: Did Hannibal have a strategy?

CLASS 7 (Mar 3): Tacitus (Chal, 165); Al-Tabari (Chal, 392); Ibn Hudhayl (Chal, 410); Ibn Khaldun (Chal, 415); Lawrence (Chal,880); Persia section (Chal, 429-452); Mongol section (Chal, pp. 463-498 —make certain you read this section); Wargames Handbook (Dunnigan), Introduction, Chap 1, Chap 3. Additional reading (if interested): Maurikios (Chal, 348); Leo VI (Chal 356); The Koran (Chal, 387); Essay Assignment: TBD or a paper on the Mongols

CLASS 8 (Mar 10): Wargame Seminar One. The Prince (Machiavelli, Chapter Fourteen); Wargames Handbook (Dunnigan) Entire book; “National Power” (Jablonsky); Additional reading: “Wargames: Winning and Losing” (Haffa and Patton); Essay/Project: Play “Bulge”; Assign “game play” paper; Discuss possible term paper topics.

Spring Break March March 15-20

CLASS 9 (Mar 24): Wargame Seminar Two. Technology and Warfare (von Creveld); “Regional Studies and Global Strategy” (Nation); The Prince (Machiavelli, Chapter Ten)

CLASS 10 (Mar 31): MID-TERM TEST. The Prince (Machiavelli, Chapters One through Three; Chapter Twelve through Twenty-Six); Machiavelli section (Chal, 535); Additional reading: Vauban (Chal, 560); de Saxe (Chal, 580); Essay TBD.

CLASS 11 (Apr 7): War and the Rise of the State (Porter); Additional reading: Ratzel (Chal, 782); Frederick the Great (Chal, 596); Essay TBD

CLASS 12 (Apr 14) On War (von Clausewitz); “Prophets or Praetorians?...” (Cassidy); Jomini (Chal, 724); Napoleon (Chal, 646); Mahan (Chal, 787); Corbett (Chal, 830)

Clausewitz readings (for April 14):
Read Paret’s essay 3-25
Read Brodie, 45-58

Read Book One 75-123 (also in Chaliand (p 671)

Read Book Two 127-147

Book Three Chapter 7 193

Book Five Chapter 15 341-344

Book Six Chapter 27 484-487

Book Six Chapter 28 488-489

Book Eight Chapter 2 579-581

Book Eight Chapter 6 Section B 605-610

CLASS 13 (Apr 21): The Clash of Civilizations (Huntington); “Grand Strategy of NSC-68" Nitze); Additional reading: Poirier (Chal, 1056); Gallois (Chal, 1065); “War Aims and War Termination” (Biddle)

CLASS 14 (Apr 28): Catch-up. First presenters of term papers.

Class 15 (May 5): Presentations of term papers.


Syllabus:

Gerard Chaliand (ed.), The Art of War in World History

Steven A LeBlanc and Katherine Register, Constant Battles The Myth of the Peaceful Noble Savage

Sun-Tzu, The Art of War

Hans Delbruck, Warfare in Antiquity

Machiavelli, The Prince

Carl von Clausewitz, On War

Samuel Huntington,  The Clash of Civilizations

Martin Van Creveld, War and Technology

Bruce Porter, War and the Rise of the State

James F. Dunnigan, The Complete Wargames Handbook (Third Edition)
   (Students may also use the second edition of this book)

James F. Dunnigan and Austin Bay, A Quick and Dirty Guide to War: 4th Edition

The course also has a packet with selected readings, including material from the US Army War College’s Guide to Strategy   

There are also several articles in the packet, from a range of contemporary writers. The packet includes a half-dozen of my newspaper columns. We discuss at least two  of those columns during the semester, one on Bosnia, Croatia, and Serbia (written in November 1991) and a column on micro-development aid in Africa (written in 2002).

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