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Michael Stoff, Director 305 East 23rd St, CLA 2.102, (G3600) Austin, TX 78712-1250 • 512-471-1442

Elizabeth L. Keating

Professor Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles

Elizabeth L. Keating

Contact

Biography

Elizabeth Keating is a professor of Anthropology and past director of the Science, Technology and Society program in the College of Liberal Arts. She is a former editor of the Journal of Linguistic Anthropology, and has over 50 publications in research journals and one book with Oxford University Press. Her research interests include social impacts of new communication technologies, the role of language in social stratification, language and space (including computer gaming space), multimodality, sign language, and cross-cultural engineering design collaborations. She has conducted fieldwork in Micronesia, the U.S., Romania, India, Brazil, and Germany. For more information and a list of publications see http://uts.cc.utexas.edu/~ekeating/

 

Interests

Linguistic Anthropology, Cross-Cultural Communication, New Communication Technologies, Multimodal Communication, Visual Anthropology, American Sign Language,

S S 301 • Hon Soc Sci: Anthropology

43645 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm SAC 5.102
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Description:

Anthropology is the study of human cultures. Anthropologists describe and analyze different ways that communities define and interpret their experiences and the world around them. This course explores anthropological approaches to researching culture and society, specifically by looking at ways we use language and other symbolic forms in creating our important social relationships. This includes identities, distinctions based on race, ethnicity, and gender, the character of our social institutions, the creation of social inequality, youth culture, language socialization and other key aspects of the rich daily life of individuals and groups. Language is a key way that people create, share, and dispute knowledge about their world and the nature of human experience.

 

Texts/Readings:

The following books and readings will be included:

Delaney, Carol, Investigating Culture

Anderson, Benedict, Language and Power: Exploring Political Cultures in Indonesia

Abu-Lughod, Lila, Veiled Sentiments: Honor and Poetry in a Bedouin Society

Reading selections from authors such as Goffman, Gumperz, Austin, Bourdieu, Hymes, Foucault, Giddens, Ochs, Tannen, and specific ethnographic studies and examples.

 

Assignments:

Students will be expected to participate actively in classroom discussions. Students will prepare short initial responses to the week's assigned readings prior to class (these responses and classroom participation are worth 20% of the grade). The class will include three writing assignments (6-8 pages each, worth a total of 40% of the grade) and two exams (worth a total of 40% of the grade).

 

About the Professor:

Professor Keating teaches courses in Anthropology (Culture and Communication, Visual Anthropology, New Communication Technologies, and Language in Society), and she was Director of the Science, Technology & Society Program at UT Austin from 2003-2007. She is the author of numerous articles on the role of language in constructing social inequalities, language and power, societal impacts of new communication technologies, and visual communication. She has conducted fieldwork in Pohnpei (Micronesia), Romania, India, Brazil, the U.S. Deaf Community, and among scientists and engineers in the U.S. She was the recipient in 2009 of the DIIA Award for Excellence in Teaching.

 

S S 301 • Hon Soc Sci: Anthropology

42845 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm WEL 2.256
show description

Description: Anthropology is the study of human cultures. Anthropologists describe and analyze different ways that communities define and interpret their experiences and the world around them. This course explores anthropological approaches to researching culture and society, specifically by looking at ways we use language in creating our important social relationships. This includes identities, distinctions based on race, ethnicity, and gender, the character of our social institutions, the creation of social inequality, youth culture, language socialization and other key aspects of the rich daily life of individuals and groups. Language is a key way that people create, share, and dispute knowledge about their world and the nature of human experience.

Texts/Readings:

The following books and readings will be included:

 

Anderson, Benedict, Language and Power: Exploring Political Cultures in Indonesia

Abu-Lughod, Lila, Veiled Sentiments: Honor and Poetry in a Bedouin Society

 

Reading selections from authors such as Goffman, Gumperz, Austin, Bourdieu, Hymes, Foucault, Giddens, Ochs, Tannen, and specific ethnographic studies and examples.

 

Assignments:

Students will be expected to participate actively in classroom discussions. Students will prepare short initial responses to the week's assigned readings prior to class (these responses and classroom participation are worth 20% of the grade). The class will include three writing assignments (6-8 pages each, worth a total of 40% of the grade) and two exams (worth a total of 40% of the grade).

 

About the Professor:

Professor Keating teaches courses in Anthropology (Culture and Communication, Visual Anthropology, New Communication Technologies, and Language in Society), and she was Director of the Science, Technology & Society Program at UT Austin from 2003-2007. She is the author of numerous articles on the role of language in constructing social inequalities, language and power, societal impacts of new communication technologies, and visual communication. She has conducted fieldwork in Pohnpei (Micronesia), Romania, India, the U.S. Deaf Community, and among scientists and engineers in the U.S. She was the recipient in 2009 of the DIIA Award for Excellence in Teaching.

S S 301 • Hon Soc Sci: Anthropology

43335 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm WEL 2.256
show description

Description:

Anthropology is the study of human cultures. Anthropologists describe and analyze different ways that communities define and interpret their experiences and the world around them. This course explores anthropological approaches to researching culture and society, specifically by looking at ways we use language in creating our important social relationships. This includes identities, distinctions based on race, ethnicity, and gender, the character of our social institutions, the creation of social inequality, youth culture, language socialization and other key aspects of the rich daily life of individuals and groups. Language is a key way that people create, share, and dispute knowledge about their world and the nature of human experience.

 

Texts/Readings:

The following books and readings will be included:

Anderson, Benedict, Language and Power: Exploring Political Cultures in Indonesia

Abu-Lughod, Lila, Veiled Sentiments: Honor and Poetry in a Bedouin Society

Reading selections from authors such as Goffman, Gumperz, Austin, Bourdieu, Hymes, Foucault, Giddens, Ochs, Tannen, and specific ethnographic studies and examples.

 

Assignments:

Students will be expected to participate actively in classroom discussions. Students will prepare short initial responses to the week's assigned readings prior to class (these responses and classroom participation are worth 20% of the grade). The class will include three writing assignments (6-8 pages each, worth a total of 40% of the grade) and two exams (worth a total of 40% of the grade).

 

About the Professor:

Professor Keating teaches courses in Anthropology (Culture and Communication, Visual Anthropology, New Communication Technologies, and Language in Society), and she was Director of the Science, Technology & Society Program at UT Austin from 2003-2007. She is the author of numerous articles on the role of language in constructing social inequalities, language and power, societal impacts of new communication technologies, and visual communication. She has conducted fieldwork in Pohnpei (Micronesia), Romania, India, the U.S. Deaf Community, and among scientists and engineers in the U.S. She was the recipient in 2009 of the DIIA Award for Excellence in Teaching. 

S S 301 • Hon Soc Sci: Anthropology

43465 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 1100-1230pm WEL 2.256
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HONORS  SOCIAL  SCIENCE 301: ANTHROPOLOGY
Unique Number: 43465
Spring, 2010: Tuesday and Thursday, 11-12:30, WEL 2.256
Professor: Elizabeth Keating, Phone: 471-8518; office EPS 2.206
Office Hours:  Tuesday, 1-3


Anthropology is unique in the way it provides knowledge about the human experience from many points of view.  Anthropologists learn about other ways of life by living among people with very different lifeways and lifeworlds, and being a participant observer in these worlds. The challenge of anthropology is to describe, in terms that can be understood cross-culturally, how different groups of people organize their lives and beliefs, for example, relationships, dress, talk, stories, how they define what is sacred, and in general make sense of experience.  This course will explore the anthropological approach, especially focusing on the role of language and everyday symbolic systems in creating and sharing culture. We will read in depth about several different communities in different world areas.  We will discuss social theories that have contributed to anthropological research, and explore how anthropology can be used to investigate many issues about behavior, such as the persistence of social inequalities, the adoption and spread of new technologies, conflicts and misunderstandings, rites of passage, and global flows of expressive forms.  We will emphasize the diverse groups that make up the United States and other world communities as their distinctive experiences are made manifest through such ideas such as gender, the self, social status, age, identity, power and ethnicity.  

Course Objectives: At the end of the semester, each student should be able to:

•    Understand and describe the basic ideas of social theory that have led to current understandings of culture.
•    Distinguish among and critique ideas about the role of human symbolic systems in creating and maintaining coherent belief systems.
•    Discuss and critique the social science methods that have been brought to bear on the study of issues such as cultural difference, social inequality, interpretation of behavior, and cultural change.
•    Discuss the impact of some new communication technologies on individuals, families, and communities.
•    Define a number of key concepts in culture, communication and language.
    
Required Readings:

1. Moore, Henrietta, and Todd Sanders eds. 2006. Anthropology in Theory: Issues in Epistemology, (AT)
    ISBN: 978-0631-22915-5, Publisher: Blackwell
2. Abu-Lughod, Lila. 1986. Veiled Sentiments. University of California Press. (VS)
3. Horst, Heather and Daniel Miller. 2006. The Cell Phone: An Anthropology of Communication, Berg Pub. (CP)
4. Alim, H. Samy. 2006. Roc the Mic Right: The Language of Hip Hop Culture. Routledge. (LHHC)
 5. A series of articles available on the Blackboard web site.

Blackboard Site: The course Blackboard site includes additional information concerning the course including all non-textbook readings, instructions for each assignment, and other information.  

Course Requirements:

1. Class preparation and participation:
•    Read course material prior to the class in order to contribute to class discussions on the materials. Pop quizzes will be given on the readings.
•    List three significant ideas in each reading and bring this list with you to class (for class participation grade), and turn it in each week.

2. Project work:     
•    3 short papers (3-5 pages, single spaced) based on collecting everyday language examples (details explained later).
•    A term paper of approximately 15 pages, double spaced, based on data collection (of language forms) and reasoning through a particular case focusing on, for example, the following themes (more details will be provided later):
        
•    Impacts of technologies on cultural practices and beliefs, including communication
•    Gender as elaborated through multiple semiotic modes (text, the body, images, sound)
•    Poetics, narrative and the role of language styles and forms in organizing our experience
•    Cultural values and social inequality
•    Globalization of work
•    Culture contact and change
    
•    10 PowerPoint slides explaining and summarizing your findings

3. Exams: There will be two exams.  They will each count for 15% of the class grade, a total of 30% for the exams.      
    Each exam is designed to check your understanding of the vocabulary and concepts we are working with.

Grading: The three short papers will count for 30 % of the grade, and the longer paper and PowerPoint slides will count for 30 %. The two exams will count 30%. Class participation, based on attendance, contributions to discussions, pop quizzes, and list of significant ideas in readings will account for 10 %.

Assignments and Exam Schedule:

Exam 1:    Tuesday Feb 16
Assignment 1:     Tuesday Feb 23
Assignment 2:    Tuesday March 23
Assignment 3:    Tuesday April 20
Exam 2:    Tuesday May 4    
Term Paper:     Friday May 7





Course Outline & Reading Assignments:


Week 1
     Jan. 19: Introduction to the Class
     Jan. 21: Introduction to Anthropological Issues
    Readings:    Moore and Sanders, “Anthropology and Epistemology,” in AT pp. 1-21
            Duranti, “Theories of Culture,” Blackboard site


Week 2
     Jan. 26 & 28: Ethnocentrism & Modes of Thought
     Readings:  Oyewumi, “The Invention of Women,” in AT pp. 540-545
            Viveiros de Castro, “Valorizing the Present: Orientalism, Postcoloniality and the
                    Human Sciences, “ in AT pp. 546-551
            Abu-Lughod, “Guest and Daughter,” in VS pp. 1-35
            Alim, “’Talkin Black in this White Man’s World’: Linguistic Supremacy, Linguistic
                    Equanimity, and the Politics of Language,” in LHHC pp. 51-68

Week 3
     Feb 2 & 4: Some Lines of Early Anthropological Thought and Method
Readings:     Malinowski, “The Group and the Individual in Functional Analysis,” in AT, pp. 88-99
    Steward, “The Concept and Method of Cultural Ecology,” in AT, pp. 100-106
    Leach, “Introduction to Political Systems of Highland Burma,” in AT, pp. 128-134

Week 4
     Feb. 9 & 11: Language and Texts, Linguistic Anthropology
    Readings:      Sapir, “Anthropology and Sociology,” in AT, pp. 68-76
            Geertz, “Thick Description: Toward an Interpretive Theory of Culture,” AT, p. 235-43
            Keesing, “Anthropology as Interpretive Quest,” AT, pp. 258-266
            Tyler, “The Antinomies,” in AT, pp. 305-310
            Horst & Miller, “Introduction,” in CP, pp. 1-18

Week 5
     Feb. 16: EXAM 1 (covering weeks 1-4)
     Feb. 18: Materiality
    Readings:   Toren, “Introduction to Mind, Materiality and History,” in AT pp. 204-219
            Donham, “Epochal Structures I: Reconstructing Historical Materialism,” AT pp. 397-406

****Assignment 1 due on Feb 23 Tuesday

Week 6
     Feb. 23 & 25: Political Technologies of the Body
    Readings:   Jackson, “Knowledge of the Body,” in AT pp. 322-335
            Martin, “The End of the Body?” in AT pp. 336-351
            Foucault, “The Body of the Condemned,” in AT pp. 352-356
            Bourdieu, “Structures and the Habitus,” in AT pp. 407-416
            Horst & Miller, “Pressure,” in CP pp. 123-136
            
Week 7
    Mar 2 & 4: Space and Globalization
    Readings:      Horst & Miller, “Locations,” in CP pp. 37-58
                Horst & Miller, “Link Up,” in CP pp. 81-102
                Horst & Miller, “Coping,” in CP pp. 103-122
            Alim, “Verbal Mujahidin in the Transglobal Hip Hop Umma,” LHHC pp. 20-50
                Gupta & Ferguson, “Beyond ‘Culture’: Space, Identity, and the Politics of Difference,
                    AT pp. 608-617
                Appadurai, “Grassroots Globalization and the Research Imagination,” AT pp. 622-632

Week 8
     March 9 & 11: Technology  
    Readings:      Horst & Miller, “Possession,” CP pp. 59-80
            Horst & Miller, “Evaluation,” CP pp. 159-182
            Castells, Chapter 1 The Information Technology Revolution. (Blackboard Site)


Week 9 (SPRING BREAK)  March 16 & 18

****Assignment 2 due Tuesday, March 23
    


Week 10
     March 23 & 25: The Language of Sentiment
    Readings:     Veiled Sentiments, Part 1 “The Ideology of Bedouin Social Life,” pp. 39-170

Week 11
     Mar 30 & April 1:  The Language of Sentiment
    Readings:  Veiled Sentiments, Part II “Discourses on Sentiment,” pp. 171-260

Week 12
     April 6 & 8: More Expressive Forms
    Readings: Alim, “’The streetz iz a mutha’: The Street and the Formation of a Hip Hop Linguistics,”
            in LHHC pp. 1-19
            Alim, “‘Bring it to the cypher’: Hip Hop Nation Language,” LHHC, pp. 69-108
            Goodwin, Charles. 1994. Professional Vision. American Anthropologist 96(3): 606-33.
                http://www.sscnet.ucla.edu/clic/cgoodwin/94prof_vis.pdf

Week 13
     April 13 & 15: Analysis
    Readings: Alim, “Spittin the Code of the Streets: The Strategic Construction of a Street-Conscious
            Identity,” in LHHC pp. 109-125
            Alim, ‘Every syllable of mine is an umbilical cord through time’: Toward an Analytical
                Schema of Hip Hop Poetics,” LHHC, pp. 126-154
            Bailey, Ben, Communication of Respect in Interethnic Service Encounters, Language in Society 26.3: 327-356 (Blackboard)

****Assignment 3 due Tuesday April 20


Week 14
     April 20 & April 22: Analysis, Language and Culture
    Readings: Basso, K. 1979. excerpts from Portraits of the Whiteman, Cambridge University Press     (Blackboard)
            Ochs and Schieffelin. 1984. “Language Acquisition and Socialization: Three
            Developmental Stories and Their Implications,” from R. Shweder and R. Levine, eds. Culture Theory: Essays in Mind, Self, and Emotion (Blackboard)

Week 15
     April 27 & 29: Some Final Thoughts, Review
    Readings: Castells, Chapter 5, The Culture of Real Virtuality: the Integration of Electronic Communication,
            the End of the Mass Audience, and the Rise of Interactive Networks. (Blackboard)

Week 16
   May 4 & 6: Second Exam, Course Overview and Conclusions

May 7: Final Paper Due

 
Other Information


Religious Holidays:
Religious holy days sometimes conflict with class and examination schedules. If you miss an examination, work assignment, or other project due to the observance of a religious holy day you will be given an opportunity to complete the work missed within a reasonable time after the absence. It is the policy of The University of Texas at Austin that you must notify your instructor at least fourteen days prior to the classes scheduled on dates you will be absent to observe a religious holy day.

Special Needs:
Students with disabilities who require special accommodations need to get a letter that documents the disability from the Services for Students with Disabilities area of the Office of the Dean of Students (471-6259 voice or 471-4641 TTY for users who are deaf or hard of hearing). This letter should be presented to me at the beginning of the semester and accommodations needed should be discussed at that time. Five business days before an exam the student should remind me of any testing accommodations that will be needed. See following website for more information: http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/ssd/providing.php

University Electronic Mail Notification Policy (Use of E-mail for Official Correspondence to Students):
All students should become familiar with the University's official e-mail student notification policy. It is the student's responsibility to keep the University informed as to changes in his or her e-mail address. Students are expected to check e-mail on a frequent and regular basis in order to stay current with University-related communications, recognizing that certain communications may be time-critical. It is recommended that e-mail be checked daily, but at a minimum, twice per week. The complete text of this policy and instructions for updating your e-mail address are available at http://www.utexas.edu/its/policies/emailnotify.html. In this course e-mail will be used as a means of communication with you. You will be responsible for checking your e-mail regularly for work and announcements. Note: if you are an employee of the University, your e-mail address in Blackboard is your employee address.

Use of Blackboard in this Class:
This course uses Blackboard, a Web-based course management system in which a password-protected site is created for each course. You will be responsible for checking the Blackboard course site regularly for class work and announcements. As with all computer systems, there are occasional scheduled downtimes as well as unanticipated disruptions. Notification of these disruptions will be posted on the Blackboard login page. Scheduled downtimes are not an excuse for late work. However, if there is an unscheduled downtime for a significant period of time, I will make an adjustment if it occurs close to the due date. Blackboard is available at http://courses.utexas.edu. Support is provided by the ITS Help Desk at 475-9400 Monday through Friday 8 am to 6 pm, so plan accordingly.

Note about Feedback:
Feedback is an important part of learning. Without feedback on how well you understand the material, it is more difficult for you to make good progress. During this course you will give me feedback on your learning in informal and formal ways, such as assignments or exams. Please let me know when something is not clear. This will enable me to provide additional information when needed or to explain a concept in different terms.

Academic Honesty:
Although I encourage you to work together, you are expected to do your own work and acknowledge use of anyone else’s work or ideas. Academic dishonesty includes: (a) copying another student’s work or letting another student copy your work and (b) copying passages or ideas directly from another source and passing them off as your own; that is, without properly referencing them. When scholastic dishonesty is suspected, I am required to notify you and possibly turn the matter over to the Dean of Students office. Penalties for academic dishonesty include a failing grade on the assignment or in this course and possible expulsion form the university. If you have specific questions about these issues, contact the Office of the Dean of Students in FAC 248.

Publications

Keating, E.L. (2009) Pragmatics and Technology. In . Studies in Pragmatics.
Keating, E.L. (2009) Societal Impacts of Nanomanufacturing. In . Nanomanufacturing, American Scientific Publishers.

Monteiro, M. and Keating, E.L. (2009). Managing Misunderstandings: The Role of Language in Interdisciplinary Scientific Collaboration. Science Communication. Vol. 31, No. 1, 6-28.

Keating, E.L., Edwards, T. & Mirus, G. (2008, September) Cybersign: Impacts of New Communication Technologies on Space and Language. Journal of Pragmatics.
Keating, E.L. (2008) Space Shifting: New Technologies, New Opportunities. Texas Linguistic Forum Texas Linguistic Forum.
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