Department of Art and Art History Studio Art

Q+A with Rachel Stuckey, MFA candidate in Studio Art

Thu. May 28, 2015

screen shot of rooms in fake internet house
Image courtesy of Rachel Stuckey.

Describe your background.

Rachel Stuckey: I'm a third generation Austinite who grew up enthusiastically participating in my high school film literacy course, Center for Young Cinema classes, and youth events at SXSW and Austin Film Festival. I spent the first couple years of my undergraduate studies at the Savannah College of Art and Design's film program and finished at the University of Colorado at Boulder's Experimental Film program, which is where I received my BFA. While in Boulder, I worked for the International Film Series and First Person Cinema, an avant-garde film showcase that has run since 1955. I also taught an after school video art class hosted by Boulder LGBT Pride and the Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art. I moved back to Austin to do freelance film and video work and establish Experimental Response Cinema, a volunteer-run micro cinema.

Why did the Studio Art program at UT Austin appeal to you?

RS: After several years of work and study in exclusively film and video environments, I wanted to expand beyond the relatively small community of experimental cinema for my graduate studies by working in a mixed-disciplinary program. Transmedia's video/digital media/performance hybrid approach, nestled within a larger studio art program, along with the department's awesome faculty, UT's research resources, and the media arts community in Austin — UT was a perfect fit. I also hope to teach, so having the opportunity to TA has been wonderful.

You're wrapping up your second year in the graduate program. You've been working on a new project, Welcome to my Homepage!. How does this work depart or act as a continuation of your previous video work?

RS: Welcome to my Homepage! is a net.art project that, unlike my single-channel video works, is changing all the time. It's an expanding cyber-dwelling that begins with the recognizable layout of a house and reaches further and further into the abstract ether of the web. It houses smaller video works and other digital art works as I make them and is also hyperlinked with projects I've made on New Hive and Tumblr, meaning unsuspecting users of those sites could encounter a doorway that routes them into the Homepage!.

It's part memory palace, part drafting board for new ideas, part net experiment. Homepage! also features a residency program, Welcome to my Guest Room!, where interested visitors can sign up to do whatever project they want in the attic space. Recently I've been using elements from Homepage! for a narrative video installation, T0WARD CY83RGN0S1S, that explores ways net-culture can manifest offline as technological occultism and internet-borne disorders.

small tv monitors in room with flowers and pink and purple light
Image courtesy of Rachel Stuckey and Hello Project. Photo by Jon Hopson.

You recently had an exhibition at Hello Project in Houston. What did you learn from the experience?

RS: Jon Hopson, Hello Project's director, approached me with the idea of building a show around a single-channel video work I had made. It was a nice push to start thinking more spatially about my video work in a very practical way, which has since influenced my practice in general. The installation included a single channel video, It Takes All Sorts, projected on an entire wall with surround sound audio that located the viewer in the middle of patronizing conversations, medical tests, and intercom announcements. Across the room were a collection of looping videos on monitors and arrangements of gaudy artificial flowers featured in the video, dimly lit in deep purple and hot pink.

Do you have any other shows coming up?

RS: I'll have a new projector performance in the New Media Art and Sound Summit in Austin on Thursday, June 11, and It Takes All Sorts will be screened in an experimental film event curated by Dani Leventhal at the Women's Studio Workshop in Rosendale, New York, this August.

Rising sophomores look back on their first year at UT Austin

Wed. May 20, 2015

print of octagonal 3D forms in beige fog
Guneez Ibrahim, digital print, model cities project completed in 2D Foundations course

"My favorite thing about UT Austin thus far is the size of the Department of Art and Art History. By the end of the year, all the freshmen faces become recognizable, and it begins to feel like a small Twin Peaks-esque town."

Guneez Ibrahim (BFA candidate in Design)


people sit for photo beside sawdust design on street
Alfombra built by students and faculty during Holy Week in Guatemala

"My favorite experience from this year has definitely been going on the Holy Week trip to Antigua, Guatemala. On our second day there, we were on a walking tour of the town, and we walked past a shop playing Livin' On A Prayer by Bon Jovi.

I said, "Bon Jovi?"

Jason Urban turned around and said, "That's basically our life this week."

So, even though his comment didn't make perfect sense to everyone that heard him, one of the themes of our week became livin' on a prayer for sure."

— Kendall Bradley (BFA candidate in Studio Art)


student in blue button up posing for camera with sketchpad
Abbie Weller inside the BOT Greenhouse

"My favorite experience during my first year at UT Austin was visiting the BOT Greenhouse with my drawing foundations class to sketch. The light was really beautiful in the early spring, and it was nice to discover a new part of campus."

Abbie Weller (BA candidate in Art History)


photography of orrange and green shapes
Seth Murchinson, Knossos, 2015, photography.

“One of the best things about coming to UT Austin is being able to interact with people in all disciplines. It really helps you to approach your own studies from a unique perspective.”

— Seth Murchison (BFA candidate in Studio Art)


woman with asymmetrical hairstyle posing for photograph
Image courtesy of Madalin Beavers.

"Probably my weirdest, yet funniest, experience during my first year was when I was walking back to my dorm late at night and came upon two guys trying to film a skate video in a street intersection. The guy being filmed was very slowly going across the intersection while the other guy was clumsily skating in front of him and filming. Both of them were wearing sunglasses, khaki shorts, weird hats, dress shirts, and ties — and looked barely conscious."

Madalin Beavers (BFA candidate in Visual Art Studies)

AGREE TO DISAGREE: 2015 Studio Art MFA Thesis Exhibition reviewed in the Austin Chronicle

Tue. May 19, 2015

white overlapping hexagonal and cube shapes on green background

AGREE TO DISAGREE: 2015 Studio Art MFA Thesis Exhibition was reviewed in the Austin Chronicle.

Fidencio Duran named to the Austin Arts Hall of Fame

Mon. May 18, 2015

painting of women dancing and man blowing bubbles in front of house
Image courtesy of Fidencio Duran.

Fidencio Duran (BFA in Studio Art, 1984) has been named to the Austin Arts Hall of Fame alongside Heloise Gold and Allen Robertson. A ceremony will take place June 1, 2015.

Jules Buck Jones presents exhibition at Conduit Gallery

Mon. May 18, 2015

mixed media painting and drawing with overlapping images of foilage and big cat
Invisible Predator, 2015, mixed media on paper, 60 x 120 inches

Jules Buck Jones (MFA in Studio Art, 2008) presents work in Portraits of an Invisible Predator at Conduit Gallery. The exhibition will be on view May 16 – June 20, 2015.

Syndicate content