Department of Art and Art History Study Abroad

Q+A with Eugenie Scrase, Royal College of Art exchange student in Sculpture

Tue. November 24, 2015

screen shot of video of dog
Image still from Powdercoat Footprint/Kevin and Dylan, 2014. Image courtesy of the artist.

What has been the most surprising experience of your time in Austin so far?

Eugenie Scrase: I was surprised to see so many people riding bikes around Austin. As an ardent cyclist back in London I was so happy to see such a strong love for it here in Austin too. I had never seen bike racks on the front of buses either (not even in Copenhagen!); I’ll be pushing that idea onto the mayor of London when I get back to the UK!

In your work, which media do you find yourself working with most? Why do these fit your practices best?

ES: I mostly work in sculpture and film. The metal workshop in the Department of Art and Art History is brilliant—as are the technicians there. I’ve just come back from a week long road trip across Texas over to White Sands National Preserve in New Mexico. Along the way I chose particular locations to shoot some film footage that I’m now editing.

Writing plays a huge role in my practice. Along with drawing, it enables me to percolate thoughts and ideas.

screen shot of video of person's foot with yellow painted footprints
Image still from Powdercoat Footprint/Kevin and Dylan, 2014. Image courtesy of the artist.

Would you describe the themes that you work with? What drives your interest in them?

ES: I often use the term ‘Haptic Visuality’ or ‘Hapicity’ to describe my practice. It is sensuous imagery that evokes memory of the senses (i.e. water, nature); depicting acute states of sensory activity (smelling, sniffing, tasting, etc.). The haptic
image is in a sense, ‘less complete’, requiring the viewer to contemplate the image as a material presence rather than an easily identifiable representational cog in a narrative wheel.

This has stemmed from my previous research into the Phenomenology of Landscape—our perceptions of landscape and our movement within it.

As part of the UT < > RCA exchange program, you will present an exhibition. When and where will your exhibition be on view?

ES: It’s going to be in one of the Long Horn Stadium Squash Courts. I’m immensely excited to have to opportunity to be showing work in a space so heavily associated with the human body. There are some stunning marks on the court’s walls made by the contact of ricocheting squash balls. The date hasn’t been set yet. I’m anticipating it opening in the first week of December.

Inaugural Seminars on Site course completes study abroad trip

Thu. October 29, 2015

people post for a group photo in Rome
Photo by Amy Angell.

This fall, the Department of Art and Art History piloted its first semester of Seminars on Site, a new course supported by the Kimbell Art Foundation. The seminar, entitled Architecture and Decoration in Pre-modern Rome: Patronage, Politics, and the Past, was offered to graduate Art History students and taught by Penelope Davies and Joan Holladay.

After their trip, the students described their experience via email. Don't miss this photo album documenting their trip!

Our trip to Rome provided us students with an opportunity that few students of art history receive in their academic careers: the chance to study architectural monuments in person, particularly with two of the greatest experts in the fields of ancient Roman and medieval art and decoration. We were able to fit so many site visits into these 10 days. I would enroll in the course again in a heartbeat if offered the opportunity!" — Allison Porambo

"For me it was the opportunity of a lifetime. What I found most rewarding about our experience in Rome was the ability to stand before some of the grandest monuments in the history of human endeavor and being able to make a real connection to the past, and its people through the rich visual narrative of architecture. What it has helped me to realize is that there is a vibrancy inherent in every city, an unending cycle of decay and renewal. Through the recycling of art, architectural space, one can not only reclaim the past, but through careful rearrangement also add to a city or building’s narrative, in essence giving it a life.

They say that you never truly know someone until you travel with them. The day-to-day interaction as a class in Rome afforded us the unique opportunity for discovering multi-vocalic perspectives, and an opportunity to forge friendships that will, I hope, span our academic careers. " — Christopher Wood

"Going to Rome was an incredible experience. This was my first visit to the city—and to Italy—and I feel so fortunate to have had such amazingly knowledgeable tour guides. While the long days were pretty exhausting, and my feet haven’t entirely forgiven me, it was worth it to get to see the multi-layered fragments of Ancient and Medieval Rome up close and within the living city, and to see the unforgettable views of the landscape from atop the seven hills and through the windows of historic monuments like the Colosseum and Castel San Angelo." — Shana Thompson

"The trip to Rome was absolutely amazing. Seeing the monuments themselves added an indescribable layer of depth to my overall understanding of Roman life in the ancient and medieval periods. It was an unforgettable experience!" — Katrina Erni

"The trip to Rome was incomparable! We learned so much about so many different places in such a short time span that it was truly a whirlwind! By far my favorite monument was the Pantheon. (I've attached a photo of it at night) We discussed it in such great detail that I never imagined I could learn so much about a place I thought I was familiar with." — Sally Topping

"Walking among Rome’s urban landscape provided an understanding of the physical space of the city that looking at a map cannot deliver. Presenting research on a monument on-site lent weight and permanence to words that a slideshow of photographs in a classroom cannot give. The opportunity to experience the modern city and witness its integration with the ancient and medieval worlds allowed for a more complex perception of Rome and offered inspiration for future projects." — Amy Angell

"The ability to experience and interact with Roman monuments greatly altered my perception of ancient and medieval Rome. I was most impressed with the size of Rome. Although some areas of the city had a high concentration of monuments, other notable structures were much further from the city center than I previously realized. Traversing the streets of Rome provided me with a clear understanding of the city’s space during the ancient and medieval periods." — Alexandra Madsen

Erin Curtis presents solo exhibition, A Narrow Escape from History

Fri. September 11, 2015

Image courtesy of the artist.

Erin Curtis (M.F.A. in Studio Art, 2007) presents new work in her solo exhibition A Narrow Escape from History. The exhibition will be on view at Big Medium September 4–26, 2015.
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