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Cherise Smith, Ph.D, Director JES A232A, Mailcode D7200, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-1784

Eric Tang

Assistant Professor Ph.D., 2006, American Studies, New York University

Assistant Professor of African and African Diaspora Studies
Eric Tang

Contact

Biography

 

Courses Taught:

  • AAS 310/ AFR 317E/ AND 310L: Diaspora- Race, Nation, and Resistance
  • AAS 330/ ANT 322M/ AMS 321: Asian American Activism
  • AAS 330/ AFR 374D/ ANT 324L: Racism and Anti-Racism

 

 

Interests

Racism & Anti-racism; The Poetics of Displacement; Urban Unrest; Activist research

AFR 372F • Urban Unrest

30565 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm SZB 370
(also listed as AAS 330, AMS 321, ANT 324L, URB 354 )
show description

How and when do cities burn? The modern US city has seen its share of urban unrest, typified by street protests (both organized and spontaneous), the destruction of private property, looting, and fires. Interpretations of urban unrest are varied: some describe it as aimless rioting, others as political insurrection. Most agree that the matter has something to do with the deepening of racism, poverty and violence. This course takes a closer look at the roots of urban unrest, exploring a range of origins: joblessness, state violence, white flight, the backlash against civil rights gains, new immigration and interracial strife. Urban unrest is often cast as an intractable struggle between black and white, yet this course examines the ways in which multiple racial groups have entered the fray. Beyond race and class, the course will also explore unrest as a mode of pushing the normative boundaries of gender and sexuality in public space. Course material will draw from film, literature, history, geography and anthropology.

 

Required Texts:

The majority of readings will be available as pdf on Blackboard. Students must acquire the following texts:

Robert F. Williams, Negroes With Guns

Robin D.G. Kelley, Yo Mama’s Dysfunctional: Fighting the Culture Wars in Urban America

Dan Georgakis and Marvin Surkin, Detroit: I Do Mind Dying: A Study in Urban Revolution

Robert Gooding Williams eds. Reading Rodney King/Reading Urban Uprising

 

 

AFR 372F • Urban Unrest

30405 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm BUR 224
(also listed as AAS 330, AMS 321, ANT 324L, URB 354 )
show description

How and when do cities burn? The modern US city has seen its share of urban unrest, typified by street protests (both organized and spontaneous), the destruction of private property, looting, and fires. Interpretations of urban unrest are varied: some describe it as aimless rioting, others as political insurrection. Most agree that the matter has something to do with the deepening of racism, poverty and violence. This course takes a closer look at the roots of urban unrest, exploring a range of origins: joblessness, state violence, white flight, the backlash against civil rights gains, new immigration and interracial strife. Urban unrest is often cast as an intractable struggle between black and white, yet this course examines the ways in which multiple racial groups have entered the fray. Beyond race and class, the course will also explore unrest as a mode of pushing the normative boundaries of gender and sexuality in public space. Course material will draw from film, literature, history, geography and anthropology.

 

Required Texts:

The majority of readings will be available as pdf on Blackboard. Students must acquire the following texts:

Robert F. Williams, Negroes With Guns

Robin D.G. Kelley, Yo Mama’s Dysfunctional: Fighting the Culture Wars in Urban America

Dan Georgakis and Marvin Surkin, Detroit: I Do Mind Dying: A Study in Urban Revolution

Robert Gooding Williams eds. Reading Rodney King/Reading Urban Uprising

 

Grading:

Attendance:                                                                                                                                                      

15%

Participation:                                                                                                                                                   

10%

Three Reflection Papers and re-writes [4 pages each] (worth 15% each):

45%

Final [TBD]                                                                                                                                                           

30%

 

 

 

AFR 374D • Racism And Antiracism

30470 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 900am-1000am JES A305A
(also listed as AAS 330, ANT 324L )
show description

Description

Racism preoccupies virtually every aspects of US society: culture, law, politics, economies. Yet US-basedscholars have offered surprisingly few comprehensive theories or definitions for what, exactly, racism entails and where it comes from. This course examines the few theories/definitions of racism across several fields: anthropology, sociology, psychology, cultural studies, postcolonial studies, gender/sexuality studies. During the second half of the course, we turn our attention to anti-racist activism, particularly within people of color and immigrant communities. How have these anti-racist efforts measured up to existing scholarly theories of racism? Or do they instead produce new theories and definitions of their own? (This is an upper division undergrad course).

Grading System

Attendance 15%

Participation 10%

3 reflection papers [4 pgs each] (worth 15% each) 45%

Final (TBD) 30%

All assignments, including reflection paper and final, must be submitted as hard copy.

Required Texts:- Course Reader (Available at Abel’s Copies: 715 W 23rd St # N [between Pearl andRio Grande]. 512-472-5353)

The following texts are available at the UT Co-op:

-Patricia Hill Collins, Black Feminist Thought: Knowledge, Consciousness, and the Politics of Empowerment

- Franz Fanon , Black Skins White Masks

- George Lipstiz: The Possessive investment in Whiteness

- Albert Memmi, Racism

- Mae Ngai, Impossible Subjects: Illegal Aliens and the Making of Modern America

 

AFR 375 • Community Internship

30440 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm JES A230
show description

Internship in a community organization that facilitates the economic, political, and social development of Austin's African American community. Students participate in research projects under the supervision of a faculty member.

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing, African and African Diaspora Studies 301, and consent of instructor.

Designed to accommodate 35 or fewer students. Restricted enrollment; contact the department for permission to register for this class.

Approximately eight hours of fieldwork a week to be arranged.

AFR 381 • Black Studies: Theory/Methods

30580 • Spring 2012
Meets TH 930am-1230pm PAR 214
show description

This course surveys seminal Black Studies texts with the goal of elucidating methods that have transformed the social sciences, humanities, and fine arts through a Black Studies epistemology. The course explores how Black Studies scholars have revised traditional disciplinary methods in pursuit of new paradigms that might constitute an open and evolving Black Studies method. This course serves to enable students to decide what method to choose for the master's thesis and, eventually, the dissertation.

AFR 374D • Racism And Antiracism

30510 • Spring 2011
Meets T 330pm-630pm JES A232
(also listed as AAS 330, ANT 324L )
show description

Racism preoccupies virtually every aspects of US society: culture, law, politics, economies. Yet US-based scholars have offered surprisingly few comprehensive theories or definitions for what, exactly, racism entails and where it comes from. This course examines the few theories/definitions of racism across several fields: anthropology, sociology, psychology, cultural studies, postcolonial studies, gender/sexuality studies. During the second half of the course, we turn our attention to anti-racist activism, particularly within people of color and immigrant communities. How have these anti-racist efforts measured up to existing scholarly theories of racism? Or do they instead produce new theories and definitions of their own? (This is an upper division undergrad course).

AFR 317E • Diaspora: Race/Nation/Resistnc

35270 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm UTC 4.104
(also listed as AAS 310, ANT 310L )
show description

Course Description

This course offers students a comparative study in the makings and meanings of diaspora. We begin by defining the differences and similarities between diaspora and related concepts such as race, nation and cultural identity. Focusing specifically on the making of the Black Atlantic world, we then draw a comparative analysis between black diasporic life and that of other global dispersals, particularly among Asian and indigenous populations. Resistance serves as a key link in this comparative study.  As such, we focus on themes such as slavery and colonialism, black revolt in the modern world, Third World/Afro-Asian liberation, Black/Third World Feminism, globalization, the sexual politics of diaspora, Across each of these themes, we work with the premise that diaspora is an open and fluid space through which its participants “make our world anew.” (This is a lower division undergrad course)

Requirements: Students are expected to complete the course readings and to arrive prepared for discussion on the readings. Students are expected to maintain regular attendance. Class assignments include one take-home essay  (3-4 pages, typed and doubled spaced), an in-class midterm exam (identifications and short essay) and a final exam.

Grading:

Attendance:                 20%

Participation:               10%

Essay Assignment      15%     Due Oct. 23

Midterm:                      20%     In Class- Nov. 5

Final Exam:                 35%     TBA

 

Guidelines for all assignments, including the midterm and final exam, will be distributed thrpughout the course of the semester.

 Required Texts—available at the Co-op

  1. Course Reader  (Available at Abel’s Copies)
  2. Saidiya Hartman, Lose Your Mother: A Journey Along the Atlantic Slave Route
  3. W.E.B DuBois, The Souls of Black Folk
  4. Vijay Prashad, Everybody Was Kung Fu Fighting: Afro-Asian Connections & The Myth Of Cultural Purity
  5. C.L.R James, A History of Pan African Revolt
  6. Horace Campbell, Rasta and Resistance: From Marcus Garvey to Walter Rodney

AFR 374D • Racism And Antiracism

35345 • Fall 2010
Meets T 1230pm-330pm JES A230
(also listed as AAS 330, ANT 324L )
show description

Course Description
Racism preoccupies virtually all aspects of US society: culture, law, politics, the economy. Yet US-based scholars have offered surprisingly few comprehensive theories or definitions for what, exactly, racism entails and where it comes from. In the U.S., racism is chalked up to common sense: We know it when we see it. This course digs a little deeper by examining theories/definitions of racism across a number of fields: anthropology sociology, psychology, cultural studies, postcolonial studies, gender/sexuality studies. During the second half of the course, we turn our attention to anti-racist activism, particularly within people of color and immigrant communities. How do these anti-racist efforts measure up to existing scholarly theories of racism?


Grading Policy
Grading System Participation and attendance 20% Reflection Paper #1     10% Midterm (identifications and short essay)     20% Reflection Paper #2     10% Final Project 40%


Texts
Required Texts: In addition to a Course Reader, the following texts are required Albert Memi, Racism Edward Said, Orientalism Himani Bannerji eds, Returning the Gaze: Essays on Racism, Feminism and Politics Laura Pulido: Black, Brown Yellow and Left: Radical Activism in Los Angeles Franz Fanon, Black Skins, White Masks Vijay Prashad, Everybody was Kung-Fu Fighting: Afro-Asian Connections and the Myth of Cultural Purity Michael Omi and Howard Winant, Racial Formation in the United States.

AFR 317E • Diaspora: Race/Nation/Resistnc

35717 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 930-1100 JES A230
(also listed as AAS 310, ANT 310L )
show description

DIASPORA: RACE, NATION & RESISTANCE

AFR 317E (35717)/ ANT 310L (30399)/ AAS 310 (35982)

Tues. & Thurs. 9:30a-11a

JESA230

 

Instructor: Dr. Eric Tang

erictang@mail.utexas.edu

Fall Office Hours: Monday’s 1:30p-3:30p (or by appointment)

UT Community Engagement Center (CEC) 1009 East 11th Street, RM 214

 

Course Description

This course offers students a comparative study in the makings and meanings of diaspora. We begin by defining the differences and similarities between diaspora and related concepts such as race, nation and cultural identity. Focusing specifically on the making of the Black Atlantic world, we then draw a comparative analysis between black diasporic life and that of other global dispersals, particularly among Asian and indigenous populations. Resistance serves as a key link in this comparative study.  As such, we focus on themes such as slavery and colonialism, black revolt in the modern world, Third World/Afro-Asian liberation, Black/Third World Feminism, globalization, the sexual politics of diaspora, Across each of these themes, we work with the premise that diaspora is an open and fluid space through which its participants “make our world anew.” (This is a lower division undergrad course)

Requirements: Students are expected to complete the course readings and to arrive prepared for discussion on the readings. Students are expected to maintain regular attendance. Class assignments include one take-home essay  (3-4 pages, typed and doubled spaced), an in-class midterm exam (identifications and short essay) and a final exam.

Grading:

Attendance:                 20%

Participation:               10%

Essay Assignment      15%     Due Oct. 23

Midterm:                      20%     In Class- Nov. 5

Final Exam:                 35%     TBA

 

Guidelines for all assignments, including the midterm and final exam, will be distributed thrpughout the course of the semester.

 Required Texts—available at the Co-op

  1. Course Reader  (Available at Abel’s Copies)
  2. Saidiya Hartman, Lose Your Mother: A Journey Along the Atlantic Slave Route
  3. W.E.B DuBois, The Souls of Black Folk
  4. Vijay Prashad, Everybody Was Kung Fu Fighting: Afro-Asian Connections & The Myth Of Cultural Purity
  5. C.L.R James, A History of Pan African Revolt
  6. Horace Campbell, Rasta and Resistance: From Marcus Garvey to Walter Rodney

 

Course Schedule

Welcome and Introduction to the Course

August 27

 

Defining Diaspora, Race and Nation

Sept.1              Stéphane Dufoix, excerpt from Diasporas (Reader)

Sept 3              Patterson and Kelly, “Unfinished Migrations: Reflections on the African Diaspora and the Making of the Modern World,” (Reader)

 

On Loss

Sept 8              Hartman, Lose Your Mother, Chap 1-5

Sept 10            Hartman, Lose Your Mother, Remainder

 

Makings and Meanings of Blackness

Sept 15            Du Bois, Souls of Black Folk, Chap 1-3

Sept 17            Du Bois, Souls of Black Folk, Chap 4-6

 

The Global Dimensions of Blackness

Sept 22            Appiah, excerpt from In My Father’s House (Reader)

Sept 24            Prashad, Everybody was Kung Fu Fighting (Chap 1 & 2)

 

Global Dimensions of Resistance

Sept 29            James, History of Pan African Revolt (Intro, Chap 1-3)

Oct 1              James, History of Pan African Revolt (Chap 4-6)

 

Anti-Colonialism and the Third World Idea

Oct 6               Aime Cesaire, excerpt from Discourse on Colonialism (Reader)

Prashad, excerpt from The Darker Nations (Reader)

Oct 8               Von Eschen, “The Diaspora Moment” (Reader)

 

The Afro-Asian Caribbean

Oct 13             Thomas, “Caribbean Black Power: From Slogan to Practical Politics” (Reader)

Oct 15                         Prashad, Everybody was Kung Fu Fighting (Chapter 3);

Yun, “Chinese Freedom Fighters in Cuba” (Reader)

 

Diaspora and the Postcolonial World

Oct 20             View Film La Haine

Oct 22             Prashad, Everybody was Kung Fu Fighting, (Chapter 4)

 

* Short Essay Assignment due by Friday, Oct 23 by 3pm at the Warfield Center JES A232A. Drop box will be available. No email submissions please*

 

Brazil

Oct 27             Butler, Freedom Given, Freedom Won (Introduction, Chap 1 & 2). (Book available online)

Oct 29             Costa Vargas, “The Inner City and the Favela: Transnational Black Politics” (Reader)

 

Nicaragua

Nov 3               Hooker, “‘Beloved Enemies’: Race and Official Mestizo Nationalism in      Nicaragua” (Reader)

Nov 5               MIDTERM EXAM

 

Gendering the Diaspora

Nov 10             Maryse Conde, “Pan Africanism, Feminism and Culture” (Reader)

Nov 12             Mohanty, “Cartographies of Struggle” (Reader)

 

Diaspora and the Politics of Sexuality

Nov 17             Clarke, “Lesbianism is an Act of Resistance” (Reader)

Lourde. “Age, Race, Class and Sex: Women Redefining Difference (Reader)

Nov 19             View Film Looking for Langston

 

Jamaica

Nov 24             Campbell, Rasta and Resistance (Chap 1-3)

Nov 26             NO CLASS -- Thanksgiving (Continue reading Campbell, Chap 4-5)

 

Cultures of Resistance

Dec 1              Fernandes and Stanyek, “Hip-Hop and Black Public Spheres in Cuba, Venezuela, and Brazil” (Reader)

Dec 3              Prashad, Everybody was Kung Fu Fighting, (Chapter 4)

 

FINAL EXAM—TBA

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