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Mary Neuburger, Director BUR 452, 2505 University Avenue, Stop F3600, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-3607

Lecture: Recovering and Preserving the Richness of Central Asian Nomadic Culture: the Challenges for Public Memory by Dr Saule Satayeva

Thu, March 28, 2013 • 3:30 PM • CAL 100

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*** Please note the room change – this event will now take place in Calhoun 100 ***

A major characteristic of Kazakh nomadic civilization is that even under difficult climatic conditions, people kept in harmony with nature, and created economic symbiosis between urban and rural environments. However, the extinction of this nomadic culture occurred due to conquest by the Russian Empire, the proletarian revolution, the Soviet agricultural policy and orders that led to the Great Famine of the 1930’s, World War II and the development of virgin lands. It is important to preserve and understand all components of Kazakhstan’s past nomadic life, as its spiritual values are an integral part of worldwide history.

Photographs and drawings are part of the visual anthropology that provides information about little-known aspects of the lives of peoples. This presentation will focus on the preservation of Kazakhstan’s nomadic heritage and why it is important.

The Kazakh people are among only a few nations with a Nomad past in Central Asia. Kazakh nomadic history has a lot in common with that of Native Americans. Many Native Americans and Kazakhs have been trying to restore important facets of their history after decades of oppression in their societies. It will be interesting to share how we, in Kazakhstan, are trying to preserve our history through the publication of historical documents; protection of our natural resources; revitalization of the Kazakh language, ancient customs and traditions; and educational measures for teaching our new generation.

Click HERE to view the flyer.

Sponsored by: The Center for Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies, The Center for Middle Eastern Studies and the Department of History


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