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Edmund T. Gordon, Chair 2109 San Jacinto Blvd , Mailcode E3400, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-4362

Laurie B. Green

Associate Professor Ph.D., 1999, University of Chicago

Associate Professor of History
Laurie B. Green

Contact

AFR 381 • Gender/Race/Natl Id In Us Hist

30643 • Fall 2014
Meets M 200pm-500pm GAR 1.122
(also listed as AMS 391, HIS 389, MAS 392, WGS 393 )
show description

Problems of race, gender, and national identity continue to preoccupy Americans, both inside and outside of the academy. These subjects and their interrelatedness have become central to much historical inquiry among U.S. scholars, particularly in the last twenty-five years. Such work has profoundly influenced the ways in which many historians approach their research. This graduate research seminar offers students the opportunity to critically discuss major works in the recent historiography of gender, race and national identity in the 20th-century U.S., and to write a research paper on a related topic of their own choosing, preferably based on one of the archival repositories at the University of Texas at Austin. The course will pay particular attention to methodologies by which historians have approached these complex subjects. Our discussion of methodologies will address three core questions: 1) How did these ideas shape and, in turn, were shaped by historical social, economic, cultural and political developments? In other words, in what ways were they historical? 2) How did ideas about gender, race and national identity influence each other. Why, for example, has race frequently been elaborated in gendered terms of manhood and womanhood? Why have understandings of national identity and citizenship been so frequently bound up with ideas of race and gender, and with what consequences? 3) What methodologies have best allowed historians to grapple with the complexity of these ideas and their interrelations? Why does one element or another (e.g., gender), frequently drop out in the actual analysis? Conversely, why do some well-intentioned historians wind up with a “gender chapter” (i.e., a chapter on women), rather than showing its integrality to the entire project?

Course Structure

During the first part of the course we will assess various methodological approaches. We begin with a set of theoretical pieces, and then examine significant monographs that address gender, race and national identity in the context of specific thematic problems. In the early weeks of the course, students also develop ideas for research projects, identify sources, and write a brief proposal. We will visit research libraries on campus. During the middle part of the course, we suspend class meetings while students work independently and attend office hours with the professor. In the final three classes, we reconvene for students to read and comment on each others' drafts.

Texts:

Arredondo, Gabriela. Mexican Chicago: Race, Identity, and Nation, 1916-1939 (2008)

Baldwin, Davarian L. Chicago's New Negroes: Modernity: The Great Migration, & Black Urban Life. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2007.

Greene, Julie. The Canal Builders: Making America's Empire at the Panama Canal. New York: Penguin Press, 2009.

Holt, Thomas. The Problem of Race in the 21st Century. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2000.

Lui, Mary Ting Yi.  The Chinatown Trunk Mystery: Murder, Miscegenation, and Other Dangerous Encounters in Turn-of-the-Century New York City. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2005. 

Ngai, Mae. Impossible Subjects: Illegal Aliens and the Making of Modern America. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2004.

Reverby, Susan. Examining Tuskegee: The Infamous Syphilis Study and its Legacy. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2009.

Grading:

1) Regular class attendance, completion of readings, and thoughtful participation in class discussion, including submission of 1-3 questions on reading for that week. These questions/comments will be due by 11 a.m. on the class meeting day.  (20%)

2) Presentation of 15-20 minutes on 1-3 archival documents you are using in your project (10%)

3) Proposal and bibliography (10%)

4) Penultimate draft of research essay, due the Monday before class for discussion either Week 13, 14, or Week 15

6) Final essay, 20-25 pages, due Thursday, May 13, 4:00 p.m., at my office, GAR 2.116. Grade for final paper includes assessment of revisions from original draft. (60%)

AFR 374D • The Us In The Civil Rights Era

30457 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm UTC 3.134
(also listed as AMS 321, HIS 356P, MAS 374 )
show description

A half century after the high point of the Civil Rights Movement in the U.S., most American students learn about the 1955 Montgomery Bus Boycott, the 1957 Little Rock conflict over school desegregation, the 1963 March on Washington, and the fire hoses in Birmingham. Far fewer encounter the less-televised moments of civil rights history, the meanings of freedom that included but went beyond desegregation, and the breadth of participation by local people. It is even less common to consider other movements that paralleled the black freedom movement among, for example, Mexican Americans, Native Americans, and Asian Americans. Taking a comparative perspective, this upper division lecture course explores these aspects of the civil rights era. It also examines their larger historical context within American culture from the Second World War to the present. Finally, we consider questions about the writing of history: What does it mean to look back at such historic events with the benefit of hindsight?  How did they come about?  What changed?  What did not?  

Texts:

Possible texts-

Cone, James H . Martin and Malcolm and America: A Dream or a Nightmare            :

Mankiller, Wilma. Mankiller: A Chief and Her People. 

Garcia, Mario T. Blowout! Sal Castro and the Chicano Struggle for Educational Justice

Martin, Waldo E.  Brown v. Board of Education: A Brief History with Documents

Sellers, Cleveland.  The River of No Return: The Autobiography of a Black Militant and the Life and Death of SNCC           

Strum, Philippa. Mendez v. Westminster: School Desegregation and Mexican American Civil Rights. 

Takaki, Ronald.  Double Victory: A Multicultural History of America in World War II

Grading:

Three reading handouts  (5% each, 15% total)

Three in-class exams  (20% each, 60% total)

Five-page essay  (25%)

Regular class attendance (5%)

AFR 374D • Civil Rts Mov From Comp Persp

30346 • Fall 2012
Meets W 300pm-600pm GAR 0.120
(also listed as AMS 370, HIS 350R )
show description

This writing intensive seminar allows students who already have some familiarity with the history of the civil rights movements of the mid-twentieth century to more deeply explore themes that can be addressed only briefly in a broader lecture course. Readings and class discussions will concentrate primarily on African American and Mexican American struggles for civil rights, but also address the Asian American and Native American movements. Likewise, we compare rural and urban movements, and northern and southern ones. Using a comparative approach will allow unique insights that are usually missing in courses on the Civil Rights Movement. In this rethinking, students will consider the distinctiveness of each of these struggles while also viewing them in relation to each other, which participants frequently did at the time. In doing so, we explore how historical understandings of race, gender and class impacted these movements in distinct and shared ways. Just as importantly, this comparative perspective encourages students to gain new understandings of mid-twentieth century U.S. history as a whole.

This course has a substantial writing component. Over the course of the semester, students will deepen their understandings of the civil rights era by researching and writing a 5,000 word research paper using archival collections at the University of Texas or the Austin History Center. Papers also rely on published scholarly works and other sources such as newspapers. I work closely with students to help with this process.

Meets with AMS 370, MAS 374, AFR 374D

Course Evaluation:

Attendance and class participation, to be broken down as follows:

5%       attendance including promptness

10%     completion of readings and participation in class discussion

10%     15-minute oral presentation on research project

Research project, to be broken down as follows:

5%       Five brief assignments that form building blocks for the paper (1% each)

                        Note: These will not be graded but must be submitted for credit.

10%     First section, draft

15%     Second section, draft

20%     Full draft including third section and conclusion

25%     Final paper

 

Required Readings:

Maeda, Daryl J. Chains of Babylon: The Rise of Asian America.

Moody, Anne. Coming of Age in Mississippi.

Nelson, Alondra. Body and Soul: The Black Panther Party and the Fight Against Medical Discrimination.

Orleck, Annelise and Lisa Gayle Hazirjian, eds. The War on Poverty: A New Grassroots History, 1964-1980.

Oropeza, Lorena. ¡Raza Si! ¡Guerra No! Chicano Protest and Patriotism during the Viet Nam War Era.

Phillips, Kimberley L. War! What is it Good For? Black Freedom Struggles and the U.S. Military from World War II to Iraq.

Turabian, Kate L. A Manual for Writers of Research Papers, Theses, and Dissertations (7th edition) NOTE: Be sure you purchase the correct edition.

AFR 374D • The Us In The Civil Rights Era

30369 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm SAC 5.102
(also listed as AMS 321, HIS 356P, MAS 374 )
show description

The year 2010 marks the 55th anniversary of the Supreme Court’s implementation decision in Brown v. Board of Education decision, the 65th anniversary of Mendez v. Westminster (a school desegregation case that helped pave the way for Brown), and the 45th anniversary of the Voting Rights Act. These events had an enormous impact on American politics and culture. But what does it mean to look back at such historic events decades later, with the benefit of hindsight?  How did they come about?  What changed?  What did not?  To answer these questions and provide a historical understanding of the modern Civil Rights Movement, this course examines the Civil Rights Movement and the U.S. within the larger context of American society, from World War II to the 1970s. Using a comparative approach, the course traces social movements initiated by African Americans, Mexican Americans, Asian Americans and Native Americans. At the same time, we explore the politics, popular culture and social life of this era, considering such topics as the Cold War, mass media, urbanization, and the Vietnam War. Throughout we address such broad themes as American democracy and citizenship, race and racism, gender and sexuality, labor and class conflict. Although the class is primarily a lecture course, students are encouraged to engage critically with the course content through a variety of small and large group discussions and assignments.

 

Course requirements:

1) Three reading handouts                 (5% each, 15% total)

2) Three in-class mid-term exams      (20% each, 60% total)

3) Five-page essay,                            (25%)

 

Tentative Reading List:

Cone, James H . Martin and Malcolm and America: A Dream or a Nightmare         :

Crow Dog, Mary.  Lakota Woman

Glisson, Susan M., ed., The Human Tradition in the Civil Rights Movement

Martin, Waldo E.  Brown v. Board of Education: A Brief History with Documents

Oropeza, Lorena, ¡Raza Si! ¡Guerra No! Chicano Protest and Patriotism During the Viet Nam War Era

Sellers, Cleveland. The River of No Return: The Autobiography of a Black Militant and the Life and Death of SNCC      

Takaki, Ronald.  Double Victory: A Multicultural History of America in World War II

AFR 381 • Gender/Race/Natl Id In Us Hist

30589 • Spring 2012
Meets M 300pm-600pm GAR 1.122
(also listed as AMS 391, HIS 389, WGS 393 )
show description

Problems of race, gender, and national identity continue to preoccupy Americans, both inside and outside of the academy. These subjects and their interrelatedness have become central to much historical inquiry among U.S. scholars, particularly in the last twenty-five years. Such work has profoundly influenced the ways in which many historians approach their research. This graduate research seminar offers students the opportunity to critically discuss major works in the recent historiography of gender, race and national identity in the 20th-century U.S., and to write a research paper on a related topic of their own choosing, preferably based on one of the archival repositories at the University of Texas at Austin. The course will pay particular attention to methodologies by which historians have approached these complex subjects. Our discussion of methodologies will address three core questions: 1) How did these ideas shape and, in turn, were shaped by historical social, economic, cultural and political developments? In other words, in what ways were they historical? 2) How did ideas about gender, race and national identity influence each other. Why, for example, has race frequently been elaborated in gendered terms of manhood and womanhood? Why have understandings of national identity and citizenship been so frequently bound up with ideas of race and gender, and with what consequences? 3) What methodologies have best allowed historians to grapple with the complexity of these ideas and their interrelations? Why does one element or another (e.g., gender), frequently drop out in the actual analysis? Conversely, why do some well-intentioned historians wind up with a “gender chapter” (i.e., a chapter on women), rather than showing its integrality to the entire project?

Course Structure

During the first part of the course we will assess various methodological approaches. We begin with a set of theoretical pieces, and then examine significant monographs that address gender, race and national identity in the context of specific thematic problems. In the early weeks of the course, students also develop ideas for research projects, identify sources, and write a brief proposal. We will visit research libraries on campus. During the middle part of the course, we suspend class meetings while students work independently and attend office hours with the professor. In the final three classes, we reconvene for students to read and comment on each others' drafts.

 

Course Requirements

1) Regular class attendance, completion of readings, and thoughtful participation in class discussion, including submission of 1-3 questions on reading for that week. These questions/comments will be due by 11 a.m. on the class meeting day.  (20%)

2) Presentation of 15-20 minutes on 1-3 archival documents you are using in your project (10%)

3) Proposal and bibliography (10%)

4) Penultimate draft of research essay, due the Monday before class for discussion either Week 13, 14, or Week 15

6) Final essay, 20-25 pages, due Thursday, May 13, 4:00 p.m., at my office, GAR 2.116. Grade for final paper includes assessment of revisions from original draft. (60%)

Possible Texts (subject to change)

Arredondo, Gabriela. Mexican Chicago: Race, Identity, and Nation, 1916-1939 (2008)

Baldwin, Davarian L. Chicago's New Negroes: Modernity: The Great Migration, & Black Urban Life. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2007.

Greene, Julie. The Canal Builders: Making America's Empire at the Panama Canal. New York: Penguin Press, 2009.

Holt, Thomas. The Problem of Race in the 21st Century. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2000.

Lui, Mary Ting Yi.  The Chinatown Trunk Mystery: Murder, Miscegenation, and Other Dangerous Encounters in Turn-of-the-Century New York City. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2005.  

Ngai, Mae. Impossible Subjects: Illegal Aliens and the Making of Modern America. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2004.

Reverby, Susan. Examining Tuskegee: The Infamous Syphilis Study and its Legacy. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2009.

AFR 374D • The Us In The Civil Rights Era

30263 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 930am-1100am UTC 3.134
(also listed as AMS 321, HIS 356P, MAS 374 )
show description

A half century after the high point of the Civil Rights Movement in the U.S., most American students learn about the 1955 Montgomery Bus Boycott, the 1957 Little Rock conflict over school desegregation, the 1963 March on Washington, and the fire hoses in Birmingham. Far fewer encounter the less-televised moments of civil rights history, the meanings of freedom that included but went beyond desegregation, and the breadth of participation by local people. It is even less common to consider other movements that paralleled the black freedom movement among, for example, Mexican Americans, Native Americans, and Asian Americans. Taking a comparative perspective, this upper division lecture course explores these aspects of the civil rights era. It also examines their larger historical context within American culture from the Second World War to the present. Finally, we consider questions about the writing of history: What does it mean to look back at such historic events with the benefit of hindsight?  How did they come about?  What changed?  What did not?  

 

Course requirements and grading structure:

Three reading handouts  (5% each, 15% total)

Three in-class exams  (20% each, 60% total)

Five-page essay  (25%)

Regular class attendance (5%)

Students are also responsible for completing assigned readings.

This course WILL use + and – letter grades.

 

Possible required readings:

Coursepack of primary documents and articles

Cone, James H . Martin and Malcolm and America: A Dream or a Nightmare            :

Crow Dog, Mary.  Lakota Woman

Glisson, Susan M., ed., The Human Tradition in the Civil Rights Movement

Martin, Waldo E.  Brown v. Board of Education: A Brief History with Documents

Oropeza, Lorena, ¡Raza Si! ¡Guerra No! Chicano Protest and Patriotism During the Viet Nam War Era

Sellers, Cleveland.  The River of No Return: The Autobiography of a Black Militant and the Life and Death of SNCC   

Takaki, Ronald.  Double Victory: A Multicultural History of America in World War II

 

This course partially fulfills the legislative requirement for American history. 

AFR 374D • The Us In The Civil Rights Era

35507 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 930-1100 UTC 3.134
(also listed as AMS 321, HIS 356P, MAS 374 )
show description

HISTORY OF THE U.S. IN THE CIVIL RIGHTS ERA

HIS 356P / Unique #39760

Same as AFR 374D / 35507, AMS 321 / 30410, MAS 374 / 35937

Spring 2010    UTC 3.134    T TH 9:30 – 11:00

Prof. Laurie Green, Department of History

 Americans recently marked the 50th anniversary of the Supreme Court’s Brown v. Board of Education decision (1954), the 40th anniversary of both the Civil Rights Act (1964) and the Voting Rights Act (1965).  And next year is the 40th anniversary of the assassination of Dr. King. These events had an enormous impact on American politics and culture. But what does it mean to look back at such historic events with the benefit of hindsight?  How did they come about?  What changed?  What did not?  To answer these questions and provide a historical understanding of the modern Civil Rights Movement, this course examines the Civil Rights Movement within the larger context of American society, from World War II to the 1970s.

 Course requirements and grading structure:

  • Three reading handouts  (5% each, 15% total)
  • Three in-class exams  (20% each, 60% total)
  • Five-page essay  (25%)
  • Students are also responsible for regular class attendance and assigned readings.
  • This course WILL use + and – letter grades.

 Required readings:

Coursepack of primary documents and articles

Cone, James H . Martin and Malcolm and America: A Dream or a Nightmare            :

Crow Dog, Mary.  Lakota Woman

Glisson, Susan M., ed., The Human Tradition in the Civil Rights Movement

Martin, Waldo E.  Brown v. Board of Education: A Brief History with Documents

Oropeza, Lorena, ¡Raza Si! ¡Guerra No! Chicano Protest and Patriotism During the Viet Nam War Era

Sellers, Cleveland.  The River of No Return: The Autobiography of a Black Militant and the Life and Death of SNCC           

Takaki, Ronald.  Double Victory: A Multicultural History of America in World War II

Important Notes:

  • Regular attendance is required.  After 2 unexcused absences, you will be asked to provide a written excuse (medical emergency or U.T. official business are considered excusable). Students are responsible for obtaining notes on material and announcements missed in class.  Although you may discuss lectures with the instructor or TA, lecture notes will not be provided for missed classes
  • Arrive on time and do not leave before end of class. Any exceptions should be discussed with professor beforehand.
  • Films screened in class are required course material.  Most films will be placed on reserve at the AV Library after being shown in class.
  • Papers must be submitted on the due date unless a written medical excuse or documentation of family emergency is provided.  Papers must be submitted in hard copy, not electronically.  Late papers will result in a loss of 10 points for each day they are late.  Papers should be typed, double-spaced, with 12-point type, and 1" margins. A handout on the paper assignment will be available prior to the due date.
  • Exams must be taken on the scheduled date unless a written medical excuse or documentation of family emergency or university-related conflict is provided.  Make-up exams will be granted for anyone who misses an exam, but those without such documentation will have 10 points deducted from the exam grade.
  • Blackboard will be used by the instructor and TA to post class announcements, office hours, lecture outlines, and assignments, including reading handouts.
  • Special accommodations will be provided, upon request, for qualified students with learning disabilities.  Contact the Dean of Students office at 471-6259 or 471-4641.
  • Academic Integrity: The University of Texas adheres strictly to guidelines regarding academic integrity, including cheating and plagiarism.  These guidelines extend to all material found on the worldwide web, as well as to all print material.  Penalties for violations may include loss of credit for the course. For the history department’s guidelines, see: http://www.utexas.edu/cola/depts/history/about/academic_integrity/

            COURSE SCHEDULE

Week 1:  Introduction: Why Study the Civil Rights Movement Today?

Week 2:  READ: Takaki, Introduction through ch. 5

Week 3:  READ: Takaki, ch. 6-7, Coursepack selection (“Rosie”)

Written Assignment: Reading handout on Takaki

Week 4: READ: Glisson, ch. 7, Oropeza, ch. 1

Week 5:  READ: Coursepack selections (Dudziak; Fairclough)

Week 6: READ: Glisson, ch. 2; Martin, 7-19, 76-86, 91-100, 110-120

EXAM #1  Bring blue books and ink pens.                             

Week 7: READ: Martin, 121-23, 137-51, 156-62, 168-98, 199-223; Coursepack selections (Ruiz, Mendez, Robinson)

Written Assignment: Reading handout on Martin

Week 8:  READ: Coursepack selections (Blue, Daniel)

Week 9:  READ: Sellers, ch. 1-5, Glisson, ch. 8-11

Week 10:  READ: Sellers, ch. 6-9

Exam #2  Bring blue books and ink pens.

Week 11:  READ: Coursepack selection (Green), Cone, ch. 3-4, 7-8, Sellers, ch. 11-12, 14-19

Week 12:  READ: Cone, ch. 9, Oropeza, ch. 2-3

5-Page Essay due.

Week 13:  READ: Oropeza, ch. 4-5, Glisson, ch. 14

Week 14:  READ: Glisson, ch. 13, 15, 16, Mary Crow Dog, ch. 1-11 (ch. 12-16, optional)

Writing Assignment: Reading handout on Mary Crow Dog

Week 15: READ: Coursepack selection (Kozol)

EXAM #3  Bring blue books and ink pens.

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