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Elizabeth Engelhardt, Chair Burdine 437, Mailcode B7100, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-7277

Janet M. Davis

Professor Ph.D., History, University of Wisconsin (Madison)

Associate Professor
Janet M. Davis

Contact

Biography

Professor Davis was born in Honolulu, Hawaii in 1964, three days after a devastating Alaskan earthquake triggered tsunami warnings across the Hawaiian Islands and beyond. She spent the majority of her childhood and young adulthood in the Upper Midwest—with intermediate stops on study abroad programs in Germany and India. From 1986-1989, Professor Davis worked as a flight attendant for Northwest Airlines.  She finished her Ph.D. in U.S. History in 1998 and landed at the University of Texas that fall.

Research Interests

U.S. cultural and social history; popular culture; social thought; animal studies; women’s and gender history; U.S. social movements; modern South Asia

Publications

Professor Davis is currently writing a book, “The Gospel of Kindness: Animal Welfare and the Making of Modern America” (under contract with Oxford University Press). “The Gospel of Kindness” analyzes the relationship between the growth and development of the U.S. animal welfare movement and ideologies of American benevolence and exceptionalism from the Second Great Awakening to the eve of World War II.  The project pays special attention to the religious dimensions of the movement, as well as its relationship to American expansionism. Professor Davis is also the author of The Circus Age: Culture and Society under the American Big Top (University of North Carolina Press, 2002), the winner of a Choice Outstanding Academic Title Award; the Robert W. Hamilton Book Award; and a finalist for the George Freedley Memorial Award from the Theatre Library Association.  Professor Davis is also the editor of Circus Queen and Tinker Bell: The Life of Tiny Kline (University of Illinois Press, 2008), by Tiny Kline. Professor Davis works regularly as a consultant for museum exhibitions and documentary films. She has received fellowships from FLAS VI in Hindi, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the American Association of University Women, and the University of Texas at Austin.

Courses taught

Professor Davis teaches Introduction to American Studies, both halves of Main Currents in American Culture, and specialized seminars in U.S. social and cultural history; popular culture; animal studies; women’s and gender history; cultural approaches to U.S. foreign relations; and U.S. social movements. Professor Davis has won the President’s Associates Teaching Excellence Award (2004), as well as the Eyes of Texas Excellence Award (2000).

Interests

U.S. cultural and social history; popular culture; social thought; animal studies; women’s and gender history; U.S. social movements; modern South Asia

AMS 310 • Intro To American Studies

30825 • Fall 2014
Meets MW 300pm-430pm WEL 1.308
(also listed as HIS 315G )
show description

AMS 310 is an introductory course in American Studies—the interdisciplinary study of American culture and society. We will begin our journey by considering some of the critical transformations—both physical and ideological—that World War II brought to American society and culture.  Filled with televisions, cars, suburbs, malls and chain stores, the landscape that we know so well today came of age during this period.  Throughout the course, we will analyze how communities, broadly defined by differing variables like age, geography, gender, race, ethnicity, class and/or political persuasion, have wrestled with questions about identity, inclusion and exclusion in modern America. While the course will proceed chronologically, I have organized these topics around three separate themes: consumerism, youth culture, and multiculturalism.                 

                 

Requirements

First exam (in-class): 20%

Second exam (in-class): 30%

Final exam (cumulative, 3 hours long): 50 %.

In addition to the graded assignments, regular attendance is expected.

 

Possible Texts

Clara Marie Allen and Constance Bowman Reid, Slacks and Calluses: Our Summer in a Bomber Factory

Mary Brave Bird, Lakota Woman

Elva Treviño Hart, Barefoot Heart: Stories of a Migrant Child

Jack Kerouac, On the Road

Ken Kesey, One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest

Anne Moody, Coming of Age in Mississippi

 

Partially fulfills legislative requirement in American History. 

Flag(s): Cultural Diversity

 

 

AMS 390 • Watershed Decade: The 1970s

31225 • Spring 2014
Meets M 1000am-100pm BUR 436B
(also listed as HIS 389 )
show description

Graduate standing required. Permission from instructor required.

AMS 310 • Intro To American Studies

30705 • Fall 2013
Meets MW 330pm-500pm BEL 328
(also listed as HIS 315G )
show description

AMS 310 is an introductory course in American Studies—the interdisciplinary study of American culture and society. We will begin our journey by considering some of the critical transformations—both physical and ideological—that World War II brought to American society and culture.  Filled with televisions, cars, suburbs, malls and chain stores, the landscape that we know so well today came of age during this period.  Throughout the course, we will analyze how communities, broadly defined by differing variables like age, geography, gender, race, ethnicity, class and/or political persuasion, have wrestled with questions about identity, inclusion and exclusion in modern America. While the course will proceed chronologically, I have organized these topics around three separate themes: consumerism, youth culture, and multiculturalism.                 

                 

Requirements

First exam (in-class): 20%

Second exam (in-class): 30%

Final exam (cumulative, 3 hours long): 50 %.

In addition to the graded assignments, regular attendance is expected.

 

Possible Texts

Clara Marie Allen and Constance Bowman Reid, Slacks and Calluses: Our Summer in a Bomber Factory

Mary Brave Bird, Lakota Woman

Elva Treviño Hart, Barefoot Heart: Stories of a Migrant Child

Jack Kerouac, On the Road

Ken Kesey, One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest

Anne Moody, Coming of Age in Mississippi

 

Partially fulfills legislative requirement in American History.

Flag(s): Cultural Diversity

 

AMS 386 • Cultural Hist Of Us Since 1865

30825 • Spring 2013
Meets W 100pm-400pm BUR 436B
show description

Note: Graduate standing required. Students also required to attend undergraduate lectures, AMS 356

AMS 370 • Amer Popular Cul, 1682-Pres

30725 • Fall 2012
Meets T 500pm-800pm GEA 114
(also listed as HIS 350R, WGS 340 )
show description

Description

In 1682, the first American bestseller was published. Audiences in the American colonies and in England devoured Mary Rowlandson’s breathless account of her harrowing experiences as a captive of the Narragansett and Nipmunk Indians during King Philip’s War in The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson.  Taking a long, historical view, this course explores the evolution of American popular culture and its relationship to national consolidation (and at times, disunion) over the last 330 years. Starting with oral, religious, print, and live performance traditions during the colonial, early national, and antebellum periods, this course will consider the cultural impact of new technologies such as steam power, the railroad, photography, recorded sound, celluloid, the electronic transmission of moving images (i.e. television), and the internet.  Throughout the semester, we will stress the centrality of race, gender, and class in shaping the production and content of popular culture, modes of popular representation, the composition of popular audiences, and types of reception.

 

Requirements

Creative Think Piece:                                     10%

5 Short Papers (1-2 pages each):                   20%

First Draft of Final Paper (10-15 pgs):             5%

In-Class Presentation of Final Project:             10%

Final Paper (10-15 pages):                             35%

Discussion:                                                    20%

 

Possible Texts

Kathryn Zabelle Derounian-Stodola, ed., Women’s Indian Captivity Narratives 

P.T. Barnum, The Life of P.T. Barnum, Written by Himself

Ken Emerson, Doo-dah! Stephen Foster and the Rise of American Popular Culture

W.E.B. DuBois, The Souls of Black Folk

Paula Marantz Cohen, Silent Film and the Triumph of the American Myth

Tiny Kline, Circus Queen and Tinker Bell: The Life of Tiny Kline

Susan Douglas, Listening In: Radio and the American Imagination

Angela Davis, Blues Legacies and Black Feminism: Gertrude "Ma" Rainey, Bessie Smith, and Billie Holiday

Aniko Bodroghkozy, Groove Tube: Sixties Television and the Youth Rebellion

 

Upper-division standing required. Partially fulfills legislative requirement in American History.  Students may not enroll in more than two AMS 370 courses in one semester.

Flag(s): Writing, Cultural Diversity

AMS 310 • Intro To American Studies

30730 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 930am-1100am GEA 105
(also listed as HIS 315G )
show description

Description

AMS 310 is an introductory course in American Studies—the interdisciplinary study of American culture and society. We will begin our journey by considering some of the critical transformations—both physical and ideological—that World War II brought to American society and culture.  Filled with televisions, cars, suburbs, malls and chain stores, the landscape that we know so well today came of age during this period.  Throughout the course, we will analyze how communities, broadly defined by differing variables like age, geography, gender, race, ethnicity, class and/or political persuasion, have wrestled with questions about identity, inclusion and exclusion in modern America. While the course will proceed chronologically, I have organized these topics around three separate themes: consumerism, youth culture, and multiculturalism.                 

 

Requirements

First exam (in-class): 20%

Second exam (in-class): 30%

Final take-home exam: 50 %.

In addition to the graded assignments, regular attendance is expected.

 

Possible Texts

Clara Marie Allen and Constance Bowman Reid, Slacks and Calluses: Our Summer in a Bomber Factory

Mary Brave Bird, Lakota Woman

Elva Treviño Hart, Barefoot Heart: Stories of a Migrant Child

Jack Kerouac, On the Road

Ken Kesey, One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest

Anne Moody, Coming of Age in Mississippi

 

Partially fulfills legislative requirement in American History.

Flag(s): Cultural Diversity

 

AMS 390 • 20th-Cen Us Social Movements

30685 • Fall 2011
Meets W 1000am-100pm BUR 436B
(also listed as HIS 389 )
show description

coming soon

AMS 370 • Animals & American Culture

30905 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm BUR 228
(also listed as HIS 350R, WGS 345 )
show description

350R

This course partially fulfills the Legislative Requirement in American History and is also a writing component course.

 

Course Scope: A wandering pig played a central role in creating a bicameral legislature in the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1644.  According to John Winthrop, the colony’s first governor, “There fell out a great business upon a very small occasion”:  a poor widow and a wealthy merchant went to the General Court regarding the disputed ownership of a stray sow.  Although popular sympathies rested with the widow, the Court ruled in favor of the merchant, thus prompting the Court’s assistants and deputies to divide formally into two distinct legislative houses in order to make the colony’s government more representative. This is but one example of the central—if hitherto unrecognized—role that animals have played in shaping the course of American history. This interdisciplinary upper-division undergraduate seminar explores the place of animals in the social, cultural, economic, and political life of the United States. Topics of discussion include animals in entertainment; hunting; vegetarianism; changing cultural attitudes about nature; wandering animals and property rights;  animals and evolutionary theory; the rise of the animal welfare and animal rights movements;  laboring animals and the nation’s move to a motorized economy; animals and war; the growth of pet keeping as a cultural practice and big business; factory farms; the rise of veterinary science; zoos; and more.

Course requirements:  Mandatory class attendance and completion of all reading and writing assignments. Each student will serve as a discussion leader for one class; each student will also write weekly response papers and/or study questions; each student will prepare a class presentation based upon h/her research work, and will submit a final research paper of ten-fifteen pages in length on a topic relating to the course material of his or her choosing.

TENTATIVE Reading List (will be modified):

Anna Sewell, Black Beauty

James Turner, Reckoning with the Beast

Jennifer Price, Flight Maps

Steve Baker, The Postmodern Animal

Susan Jones, Valuing Animals: Veterinarians and Their Patients in Modern America

Ingrid Newkirk, Free the Animals: The Story of the Animal Liberation Front

Laura Hillenbrandt, Seabiscuit: An American Legend

Gregg Mitman, Reel Nature: America’s Romance with Wildlife on Film

Elizabeth Hanson, Animal Attractions: Nature on Display in American Zoos

 

 

 

 

 

AMS 310 • Intro To American Studies

29485 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 800am-930am GEA 105
(also listed as HIS 315G )
show description

Description

AMS 310 is an introductory course in American Studies—the interdisciplinary study of American culture and society. We will begin our journey by considering some of the critical transformations—both physical and ideological—that World War II brought to American society and culture.  Filled with televisions, cars, suburbs, malls and chain stores, the landscape that we know so well today came of age during this period.  Throughout the course, we will analyze how communities, broadly defined by differing variables like age, geography, gender, race, ethnicity, class and/or political persuasion, have wrestled with questions about identity, inclusion and exclusion in modern America. While the course will proceed chronologically, I have organized these topics around three separate themes: consumerism, youth culture, and multiculturalism.                 

 

Requirements

First exam (in-class): 20%

Second exam (in-class): 30%

Final take-home exam: 50 %.

In addition to the graded assignments, regular attendance is expected.

 

Possible Texts

Clara Marie Allen and Constance Bowman Reid, Slacks and Calluses: Our Summer in a Bomber Factory

Mary Brave Bird, Lakota Woman

Elva Treviño Hart, Barefoot Heart: Stories of a Migrant Child

Jack Kerouac, On the Road

Ken Kesey, One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest

Anne Moody, Coming of Age in Mississippi

 

Partially fulfills legislative requirement in American History.

Flag(s): Cultural Diversity

AMS 370 • Amer Pop Culture, 1682-Present

29625 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm BUR 228
(also listed as HIS 350R, WGS 340 )
show description

COURSE DESCRIPTION

AMS 370/HIS/WGS: “American Popular Culture: 1682-Present”
Fall 2010
Professor Janet M. Davis

This course fulfills a Writing Flag and the Cultural Diversity in the United States Flag.

In 1682, the first American bestseller was published. Audiences in the American colonies and in England devoured Mary Rowlandson’s breathless account of her harrowing experiences as a captive of the Narragansett and Nipmunk Indians during King Philip’s War in The Narrative of the Captivity and the Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson.  Taking a long, historical view, this course explores the evolution of American popular culture and its relationship to national consolidation (and at times, disunion) over the last 330 years. Starting with oral, religious, print, and live performance traditions during the colonial, early national, and antebellum periods, this course will consider the cultural impact of new technologies such as steam power, the railroad, photography, recorded sound, celluloid, the electronic transmission of moving images (i.e. television), and the internet.  Throughout the semester, we will stress the centrality of race, gender, and class in shaping the production and content of popular culture, modes of popular representation, the composition of popular audiences, and types of reception.


Tentative Reading List (Will Likely Change!):

Kathryn Zabelle Derounian-Stodola, ed., Women’s Indian Captivity Narratives
P.T. Barnum, The Life of P.T. Barnum, Written by Himself
Ken Emerson, Doo-dah! Stephen Foster and the Rise of American Popular Culture
W.E.B. DuBois, The Souls of Black Folk
Paula Marantz Cohen, Silent Film and the Triumph of the American Myth
Tiny Kline, Circus Queen and Tinker Bell: The Life of Tiny Kline
Susan Douglas, Listening In: Radio and the American Imagination
Angela Davis, Blues Legacies and Black Feminism: Gertrude "Ma" Rainey, Bessie Smith, and Billie Holiday
Aniko Bodroghkozy, Groove Tube: Sixties Television and the Youth Rebellion

AMS 370 • Animals And American Cul-W

29850 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm GAR 1.134
show description

ANIMALS IN AMERICAN CULTURE: SELECTED HISTORICAL TOPICS

AMS 370/HIS 350L/WGS 345

Unique Numbers: AMS—29850; HIS—39715; WGS—48575

SPRING 2010

T, Th: 12:30-1:45 PM

GAR 1.134

 

INSTRUCTOR:  Dr. Janet M. Davis

EMAIL: jmdavis1@mail.utexas.edu

OFFICE: Burdine 432

PHONE: 232-1848

OFFICE HOURS: W, 12:00-3:00 PM

This course partially fulfills the Legislative Requirement in American History and is also a Substantial Writing Component course.

Course Scope: A wandering pig played a central role in creating a bicameral legislature in the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1644.  According to John Winthrop, the colony’s first governor, “There fell out a great business upon a very small occasion”:  a poor widow and a wealthy merchant went to the General Court regarding the disputed ownership of a stray sow.  Although popular sympathies rested with the widow, the Court ruled in favor of the merchant, thus prompting the Court’s assistants and deputies to divide formally into two distinct legislative houses in order to make the colony’s government more representative. This is but one example of the central—if hitherto unrecognized—role that animals have played in shaping American history. Consequently, one of the goals of this interdisciplinary upper-division undergraduate seminar is to explore the following question: What does the U.S. history survey look like if we place animals at the center of our analysis?   This class examines the place of animals—from fish to elephants—in the social, cultural, literary, economic, and political life of America from the colonial period to the present. Topics of discussion include animals in entertainment; hunting; vegetarianism; changing cultural attitudes about nature; wandering animals and property rights; animals and evolutionary theory; the rise of the animal welfare and animal rights movements; laboring animals and the nation’s move to a motorized economy; horseracing; the growth of pet keeping as a cultural practice and big business; factory farms; the rise of veterinary science; and zoos.  We will begin each class by talking briefly about an animal topic that is currently in the news.  So please scan your newspapers, television, film, and internet sources accordingly and bring your stories to class!

Course requirements:  Mandatory class attendance, active participation in the class discussion, and completion of all reading and writing assignments are all critical to your success in this class. If you are absent, you must tell me IN ADVANCE—either in person, by telephone, or via email. If you have THREE UNEXCUSED ABSENCES, you will FAIL the course.  Each student will write a total of SIX weekly one-page response papers and/or study questions based upon the reading assignment. THREE (or more) of these weekly one-page papers must be response papers; the remainder should be study questions that engage substantively with the reading.  Although we will read most of the books over a period of at least two class meetings, you may only use assigned reading material from each book TWICE as the subject for your one-page papers. Your response papers/study questions are DUE BY NOON via email on the day PRIOR to the pertinent class discussion.  You will write these questions/short papers over the course of the semester.  THE LAST OPPORTUNITY TO HAND-IN YOUR LAST ONE-PAGE PAPER/STUDY QUESTIONS IS ON APRIL 13, 2010. You will also give a fifteen-minute class presentation based upon your research work. After your presentation, there will be a five-minute discussion period. Lastly, you will write a final research paper of 10-15 pages in length on a topic of your choosing that is related to the course material. In the fourth week of class, you will submit an outline of your proposed topic for my approval. The final paper must be double-spaced, using twelve-point font and one-inch margins.  You must use multiple sources in this paper as your evidentiary base, and you must cite them using a standard style for documentation, such as the Chicago Manual of Style, or  the Modern Languages Association (MLA). Your research paper must contain a bibliography. PLEASE NOTE: You are required to hand in ALL notes and any photocopies, downloaded material, etc., that you have used in researching and writing your paper with your final paper. I WILL NOT ACCEPT PAPERS THAT DO NOT FOLLOW THIS PROTOCOL. The final paper will be due at the American Studies office in BUR 437, on May 10, 2010, by NOON.  Papers must be on time; papers will be penalized one-half a grade for every hour that they are late without prior consultation with me. 

Grade Breakdown:

Six weekly papers/study questions (each will be 1 page):  20%

Discussion: 20%

Class Presentation (15 minutes in length, plus 5 minutes for discussion): 15%

Final Research Paper (10-15 pages in length): 45%

Grading Scale: A+: 98-100; A: 94-97; A-: 90-92; B+: 87-89; B: 83-86; B-: 80-82; C+: 77-79; C: 73-76; C-: 70-72; D+: 67-69; D: 63-66; D-: 60-62; F: 0-59.

Required Reading List:

Virginia DeJohn Anderson, Creatures of Empire: How Domestic Animals Transformed Early America

Katherine Grier, Pets in America: A History

Laura Hillenbrandt, Seabiscuit: An American Legend

Nick Jans, The Grizzly Maze: Timothy Treadwell’s Fatal Obsession with Alaskan Bears

Mark Kurlansky, Cod: A Biography of the Fish that Changed the World

Nigel Rothfels, editor, Representing Animals

Marshall Saunders, Beautiful Joe: An Autobiography

Peter Singer, Animal Liberation

All books are available for purchase at the University Co-op, and through on-line vendors such as Powells.com, bn.com,  and amazon.com.

Civility Code:  I expect everyone to be attentive, respectful, and polite to one another during class.  If you wish to read the Texan, surf the internet, talk with your neighbor, pass notes, sleep, or do anything else disruptive, then please go elsewhere.

Students with Disabilities; Any student with a documented disability that requires academic accommodations should contact the Services for Students with Disabilities  through the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement at: 471-6259 (voice), or 471-4641 (TTY for users who are deaf or hard of hearing) as soon as possible to request an official letter outlining authorized accommodations.

Academic Honesty Code:  Please note that the work you do in this class must be your own. Academic honesty is imperative. Owing to the sad reality of plagiarism in this downloadable, internet age, I will Google your written work.   I will refer all cases of academic dishonesty (i.e. cheating) to Student Judicial Services and the Dean of Student’s Office.

*****CLASS SCHEDULE*****

T 1/19:              INTRODUCTION TO COURSE AND SYLLABUS

TH 1/21:            HISTORY AND ANIMALS: METHODOLOGICAL CONCERNS: Nigel Rothfels, ed., Representing Animals, Part One (Animals in History), Chapters 1-4

T 1/26:              THEORIZING THE ANIMAL—INTERDISCIPLINARY APPROACHES, PART ONE: Nigel Rothfels, ed., Representing Animals, Part Two (The Animal Object), Chapters 5-7  

TH 1/28:           THEORIZING THE ANIMAL—INTERDISCIPLINARY APPOACHES, PART II: Nigel Rothfels, ed., Representing Animals, Part Three (Cultures of Animals), Chapters 8-11

T 2/2:               COLONIAL ANIMALS, PART ONE:  DIVERGENT COSMOLOGIES, Virginia Anderson, Creatures of Empire, Part One (Thinking about Animals), Prologue, Chapters 1-2

TH 2/4:             COLONIAL ANIMALS, PART TWO: LIVING WITH LIVESTOCK IN NEW ENGLAND AND THE CHESAPEAKE, Virginia Anderson, Creatures of Empire, Part Two (Settling with Animals), Chapters 3-5

T 2/9:             COLONIAL ANIMALS, PART THREE: CULTURAL AND POLITICAL CONFRONTATIONS, Virginia Anderson, Creatures of Empire, Part Three (Contending with Animals), Chapters 6-7, Epilogue

PAPER TOPIC PARAGRAPH DUE TODAY

TH 2/11:          THE COLONIAL AND REVOLUTIONARY ECONOMY OF ANIMALS: Mark Kurlansky, Cod, (Part One), Prologue, Chapters 1-6

T 2/16:            HISTORICAL PET-KEEPING—PART ONE: PETS AND DAILY FAMILY LIFE, Katherine Grier, Pets in America, Introduction, Chapters 1-2

TH 2/18:         NO CLASS: DR. DAVIS WILL BE OUT OF TOWN

T 2/23:            HISTORICAL PET-KEEPING—PART TWO: ANIMAL WELFARE, CLASS FORMATION AND URBANIZATION, Katherine Grier, Pets in America Chapters 3-5

TH 2/25:          HISTORICAL PET-KEEPING—PART THREE: PETS AND THE RISE OF CONSUMER CULTURE, Katherine Grier, Pets in America, Chapters 5-6, Epilogue

T 3/2:              SENTIMENTAL FICTION: THE ANIMAL STORY—PART ONE, Marshall Saunders, Beautiful Joe, Introduction, Chapters 1-18

TH 3/4:            SENTIMENTAL FICTION: THE ANIMAL STORY—PART TWO, Marshall Saunders, Beautiful Joe, Chapters 19-37; start reading Seabiscuit

T 3/9:              SHOW BIZ ANIMALS AND THE GREAT DEPRESSION—PART ONE, Laura Hillenbrand, Seabiscuit  (Parts One and Two), Chapters 1-19

TH 3/11:          SHOW BIZ ANIMALS AND THE GREAT DEPRESSION—PART TWO, Laura Hillenbrand, Seabiscuit  (Part Three), Chapters 20-23, Epilogue

3/15-3/20:       SPRING BREAK!! Read Cod, (Parts Two and Three), Chapters 7-14

T 3/23:            THE VANISHING ANIMAL: CONSERVATION CULTURE AND POLITICS, Mark Kurlansky, Cod, (Parts Two and Three), Chapters 7-14

TH 3/25:        THE CONTEMPORARY ANIMAL RIGHTS MOVEMENT—LAB ANIMALS, Singer, Animal Liberation, Chapters 1-2

SET UP CLASS PRESENTATION SCHEDULE

T 3/30:            FACTORY FARMS AND CONTEMPORARY ANIMAL RIGHTS, Singer, Animal Liberation, Chapter 3

TH 4/1:            VEGETARIANISM AND ANIMAL RIGHTS, Singer, Animal Liberation, Chapters 4-6

T 4/6:              THE MEANINGS OF WILD ANIMALS IN MODERN AMERICA: THE CASE OF TIMOTHY TREADWELL—PART ONE, Nick Jans, The Grizzly Maze, “Introduction”-“Lifeguard to the Bears”; Please note: We will watch a portion of “Grizzly Man” in class to supplement our discussion.

TH 4/8:            THE MEANINGS OF WILD ANIMALS IN MODERN AMERICA: THE CASE OF TIMOTHY TREADWELL—PART TWO, Nick Jans, The Grizzly Maze, “Fifteen Minutes and Change”-“Bear 141”

T 4/13:           THE MEANINGS OF WILD ANIMALS IN MODERN AMERICA: THE CASE OF TIMOTHY TREADWELL—PART THREE, Nick Jans, The Grizzly Maze, “Monkey Pajamas”-“Afterward: The Beast of Nightmare”

PLEASE NOTE: TODAY IS THE LAST DAY TO HAND IN YOUR LAST ONE-PAGE PAPER/STUDY QUESTIONS

TH 4/15:          BEGIN STUDENT PRESENTATIONS

T 4/20:            STUDENT PRESENTATIONS

TH 4/22:          STUDENT PRESENTATIONS

T 4/27:            STUDENT PRESENTATIONS

TH 4/29:          STUDENT PRESENTATIONS

T 5/4:              STUDENT PRESENTATIONS

TH 5/6:            LAST DAY OF CLASS: STUDENT PRESENTATIONS

M 5/10:          FINAL RESEARCH PAPERS AND YOUR RESEARCH NOTES ARE DUE AT NOON, BUR 437, AMS MAIN OFFICE, 4TH FLOOR, IN BOX MARKED “DAVIS 370” NEAR ENTRY DOOR, BY THE ELEVATORS

DISCLAIMER: THIS SYLLABUS IS SUBJECT TO CHANGE DURING THE COURSE OF THE SEMESTER. FOR EXAMPLE, I RESERVE THE RIGHT TO HOLD POP QUIZZES IN THE EVENT THAT PEOPLE ARE NOT PREPARED FOR CLASS. THESE QUIZ GRADES WILL COUNT TOWARD YOUR DISCUSSION GRADE. 

 

AMS 390 • Amer Pop Cul: Thry And Method

29870 • Spring 2010
Meets M 1200-300pm BUR 436B
show description

Graduate standing required. Permission from instructor required.

Publications

Books

Editor, Circus Queen and Tinker Bell: The Memoir of Tiny Kline, by Tiny Kline (University of Illinois Press, June 2008).

The Circus Age: Culture and Society under the American Big Top (University of North Carolina Press, September  2002). 

Articles

“Bird Day: Promoting the Gospel of Kindness in the Philippines during the American Occupation,” in Mark Lawrence, Erika Bsumek, and David Kinkella , editors, The Nation-State and the Transnational Environment (currently under review at Oxford University Press)

“Thinking about Empire, Frontier and the Evolution of the English and American Circus,” in Between Margin and Center – The Circus as Modernity in a Nutshell, edited by Yoram Carmeli (Washington, D.C.: American University Press, forthcoming, Winter 2010)

“Propagating the Gospel of Animal Kindness: Sacred Cows, Christians, and American Animal Welfare Activism with Reference to India at the Turn of the Twentieth Century,” in Speaking Truth to Power: Religion, Caste, and the Subaltern Question in India, edited by Manu Bhagavan and Anne Feldhaus (New Delhi: Oxford University Press, June 2008): 47-61  

“Cultural Watersheds in Fin de Siécle America,” 8,000-word essay in A Companion to American Cultural History (Blackwell Companions to American History), edited by Karen Halttunen, (Malden, Mass.: Blackwell Publishing, February 2008): 166-180

“Proletarian Daredevil,” review essay of Paul E. Johnson, Sam Patch, the Famous Jumper (New York: Hill and Wang, 2003), in Reviews in American History 32(2004): 176-183

“Instruct the Minds of All Classes: Celebrations of Empire at the American Circus, 1898-1910,” in Dreams of Paradise, Visions of Apocalypse, edited by Jaap Verheul. (Amsterdam: VU Press, November 2003): 58-68

“With the Greatest of Unease,” (New York) Newsday, February 24, 2002,  B7

“The Life of Tiny Kline and the Evolution of Twentieth-Century American Mass Culture,”  Bandwagon: Journal of the Circus Historical Society  45, no. 2 (May-June 2001): 4-8

“Spectacles of South Asia at the American Circus, 1890-1940,” Visual Anthropology, 6, no. 2 (1993): 121-138

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