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Anthony Di Fiore, Chair SAC 4.102, Mailcode C3200 78712 • 512-471-4206

John W. Kappelman Jr

Professor Ph.D., Harvard University

John W. Kappelman Jr

Contact

  • Phone: (512) 471-0055
  • Office: SAC 5.160
  • Office Hours: Fall 2011 - Tuesdays and Thursdays, 11am-12pm (noon)
  • Campus Mail Code: C3200

Biography


Research interests:
Dr. Kappelman is interested in the evolutionary history of primates and especially hominoid evolution and hominid origins. He currently directs an ongoing field project in the latest Oligocene/earliest Miocene of northwestern Ethiopia and participates in field projects in Turkey and China. He is also the principal investigator on a web- based comparative primate osteological database, The eSkeletons Project, and also the PI on a project for developing customizable multimedia exam delivery software, The Virtual Exams Project. His research interests include paleoecology, functional morphology, stratigraphy, paleomagnetism, and computer imaging.

 

ANT 301 • Physical Anthroplogy-Wb

31185 • Fall 2014
Meets
show description

 This course is an introduction to the principles and the methods of physical anthropology.  Physical anthropology is the study of human beings in a biological context, and seeks to explain our relationship to other primates and to the rest of the natural world.  In other words, who are we? how are we unique? how, why, an when did we come to be the way we are?The study of physical anthropology requires many different types of knowledge.  Throughout the course, we will examine anatomical, behavioral, and genetic similarities and differences among living primates, learn the basic mechanisms of the evolutionary process, and trace a pathway of human evolution as reconstructed from the fossil record.  The main goal of the course is to obtain a clear understanding of our place in nature.

ANT 366 • Anat And Bio Of Human Skeleton

31597 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 1230pm-100pm SAC 5.172
show description

This course introduces the student to an in-depth study of the human skeleton. Class sessions combine lecture and laboratory sessions and cover topics including developmental biology, functional morphology, and skeletal identification, with a special focus on the latter skill as it relates to forensics and archaeological studies. Students will also be introduced to new 3D imaging techniques for studying the skeleton. 

This class requires both intensive in-class and out-of-class preparation. Participants must be prepared to handle actual human osteological specimens and have a professional approach to this subject and the human remains. An interest in human skeletal identification is especially applicable to the fields of archeology, physical anthropology, health sciences, law, and law enforcement.

ANT 301 • Physical Anthroplogy-Wb

31345 • Spring 2014
Meets
show description

 This course is an introduction to the principles and the methods of physical anthropology.  Physical anthropology is the study of human beings in a biological context, and seeks to explain our relationship to other primates and to the rest of the natural world.  In other words, who are we? how are we unique? how, why, an when did we come to be the way we are?The study of physical anthropology requires many different types of knowledge.  Throughout the course, we will examine anatomical, behavioral, and genetic similarities and differences among living primates, learn the basic mechanisms of the evolutionary process, and trace a pathway of human evolution as reconstructed from the fossil record.  The main goal of the course is to obtain a clear understanding of our place in nature.

ANT 348 • Human Origins And Evolution

31730-31745 • Spring 2014
Meets MW 1100am-1200pm SAC 5.172
show description

This course examines the evidence for the origin and evolution of humans with particular emphasis placed on reconstructing the paleobiology of extinct hominins.  Lectures will draw upon a diverse range of disciplines (anatomy, archaeology, ecology, ethology, genetics, geology, paleontology) and integrate these into a framework for understanding the origin and evolutionary history of this unusual group of primates.  Weekly laboratories provide the student with an opportunity to examine firsthand the fossil evidence for human evolution.

ANT 301 • Physical Anthro (Self-Paced)

31030 • Fall 2013
Meets
show description

 This course is an introduction to the principles and the methods of physical anthropology.  Physical anthropology is the study of human beings in a biological context, and seeks to explain our relationship to other primates and to the rest of the natural world.  In other words, who are we? how are we unique? how, why, an when did we come to be the way we are?The study of physical anthropology requires many different types of knowledge.  Throughout the course, we will examine anatomical, behavioral, and genetic similarities and differences among living primates, learn the basic mechanisms of the evolutionary process, and trace a pathway of human evolution as reconstructed from the fossil record.  The main goal of the course is to obtain a clear understanding of our place in nature.

ANT 366 • Anat And Bio Of Human Skeleton

31500 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 930am-1100am SAC 5.172
show description

This course introduces the student to an in-depth study of the human skeleton. Class sessions combine lecture and laboratory sessions and cover topics including developmental biology, functional morphology, and skeletal identification, with a special focus on the latter skill as it relates to forensics and archaeological studies. Students will also be introduced to new 3D imaging techniques for studying the skeleton. 

This class requires both intensive in-class and out-of-class preparation. Participants must be prepared to handle actual human osteological specimens and have a professional approach to this subject and the human remains. An interest in human skeletal identification is especially applicable to the fields of archeology, physical anthropology, health sciences, law, and law enforcement.

ANT 301 • Physical Anthro (Self-Paced)

30970 • Spring 2013
Meets
show description

This course is designed as an introduction to the field of physical anthropology. During the semester you will investigate numerous and diverse subjects including modern evolutionary theory, sexual reproduction, human genetics, biological variation in populations of modern humans, mammalian phylogeny, primate diversity, behavior, biology, and ecology, the fossil record of primate and human evolution, and archaeology. The diversity of these topics will illustrate how the topics of physical anthropology are integrated and offer you an understanding of the place of humans in the world. 

ANT 348 • Human Origins And Evolution

31345-31355 • Spring 2013
Meets MW 1000am-1100am SAC 5.172
show description

This course examines the evidence for the origin and evolution of humans with particular emphasis placed on reconstructing the paleobiology of extinct hominins.  Lectures will draw upon a diverse range of disciplines (anatomy, archaeology, ecology, ethology, genetics, geology, paleontology) and integrate these into a framework for understanding the origin and evolutionary history of this unusual group of primates.  Weekly laboratories provide the student with an opportunity to examine firsthand the fossil evidence for human evolution.

ANT 301 • Physical Anthro (Self-Paced)

30870 • Fall 2012
Meets
show description

 This course is an introduction to the principles and the methods of physical anthropology.  Physical anthropology is the study of human beings in a biological context, and seeks to explain our relationship to other primates and to the rest of the natural world.  In other words, who are we? how are we unique? how, why, an when did we come to be the way we are?The study of physical anthropology requires many different types of knowledge.  Throughout the course, we will examine anatomical, behavioral, and genetic similarities and differences among living primates, learn the basic mechanisms of the evolutionary process, and trace a pathway of human evolution as reconstructed from the fossil record.  The main goal of the course is to obtain a clear understanding of our place in nature.

ANT 366 • Anat And Bio Of Human Skeleton

31265 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 930am-1100am SAC 5.172
show description

This course introduces the student to an in-depth study of the human skeleton. Class sessions combine lecture and laboratory sessions and cover topics including developmental biology, functional morphology, and skeletal identification, with a special focus on the latter skill as it relates to forensics and archaeological studies. Students will also be introduced to new 3D imaging techniques for studying the skeleton. 

This class requires both intensive in-class and out-of-class preparation. Participants must be prepared to handle actual human osteological specimens and have a professional approach to this subject and the human remains. An interest in human skeletal identification is especially applicable to the fields of archeology, physical anthropology, health sciences, law, and law enforcement.

ANT 388 • Human Evolution

31315 • Fall 2012
Meets M 900am-1200pm SAC 5.118
show description

This seminar examines the evidence for human origins and evolution as reconstructed from the fossil record and from patterns of anatomical, behavioral, and genetic similarity and difference among living primates.  A wide range of evidence from the natural and social sciences is presented to reconstruct human phylogeny, to understand past anatomical and behavioral adaptations, and to view hominids as members of diverse animal and plant communities.  Laboratory sessions will introduce the student to the range of hominid fossil material and the various techniques used to study the fossil record.  The study of human evolution is eclectic, requiring many kinds of knowledge.  Our goal is to understand what happened in human evolution and why.    This course will be of special interest to graduate students in anthropology, archaeology, geography, geology, and paleontology, and to other graduate students in anthropology who desire a current review of the literature on hominid evolution.

ANT 301 • Physical Anthro (Self-Paced)

31030 • Spring 2012
Meets
show description

This course is designed as an introduction to the study of physical anthropology. During the semester you will investigate numerous and diverse subjects including modern evolutionary theory, sexual reproduction, human genetics, biological variation in populations of modern humans, mammalian phylogeny, primate behavior, biology, and ecology, the fossil record of primate and human evolution, and archaeology. The diversity of these topics will illustrate how the different areas of physical anthropology are integrated and will offer you an understanding of the place of humans in the world.

To successfully complete this course, the student must be able to learn the material without the benefit of a lecture and laboratory session. The only meeting of the course is the initial orientation meeting. Students are responsible for setting their own proper study pace for the course, but must comply with due dates for the exams and assignments. This class is not less time consuming than other classes, but it permits the student some latitude in arranging their study and testing schedule. The course may be completed before the end of the semester by working in a more concentrated manner and testing before the due dates.  Any student who does not complete the exams and labs by their due dates will receive zeros for the assignments.

ANT 301 • Physical Anthropology

31040-31085 • Spring 2012
Meets MW 900am-1000am JGB 2.324
show description

Why are humans unique in so many features; in having culture and language; in being bipedal; in the way we gather our food, and its extraordinary range; in our social and sexual behavior and its variability?  This course examines patterns of anatomical, behavioral, and genetic similarities and differences among living primates and humans, and the evidence for human evolution as reconstructed from the fossil record.  A wide range of evidence from the natural and social sciences is presented to understand present and past anatomical and behavioral adaptations, and to view humans and our ancestors as members of diverse animal and plant communities. The study of physical anthropology is eclectic and requires many kinds of knowledge.  Our goal is to understand the place of humans in the world.

Following an introductory overview, lectures discuss the living primates, significant human behavioral and biological adaptations, and evolutionary theory.  The aim here is to clarify those scientific procedures and principles, based on the present, which are necessary to understanding the evolution of uniquely human features.

The second part of the course presents the molecular, fossil, and archeological evidence for human evolution and offers a behavioral dimension and explanation to the data.  The main foci of this part of the course include hominin origins, the appearance of the first large-brained toolmaker, and the evolution of modern humans.

Laboratories are an integral part of the course and are designed to closely follow the lecture schedule.

ANT 348 • Human Origins And Evolution

31375-31390 • Spring 2012
Meets MW 1100am-1200pm SAC 4.174
show description

This course examines the evidence for the origin and evolution of humans with particular emphasis placed on reconstructing the paleobiology of extinct hominins.  Lectures will draw upon a diverse range of disciplines (anatomy, archaeology, ecology, ethology, genetics, geology, paleontology) and integrate these into a framework for understanding the origin and evolutionary history of this unusual group of primates.  Weekly laboratories provide the student with an opportunity to examine firsthand the fossil evidence for human evolution.

ANT 301 • Physical Anthro (Self-Paced)

30800 • Fall 2011
Meets
show description

 This course is an introduction to the principles and the methods of physical anthropology.  Physical anthropology is the study of human beings in a biological context, and seeks to explain our relationship to other primates and to the rest of the natural world.  In other words, who are we? how are we unique? how, why, an when did we come to be the way we are?The study of physical anthropology requires many different types of knowledge.  Throughout the course, we will examine anatomical, behavioral, and genetic similarities and differences among living primates, learn the basic mechanisms of the evolutionary process, and trace a pathway of human evolution as reconstructed from the fossil record.  The main goal of the course is to obtain a clear understanding of our place in nature.

ANT 366 • Anat And Bio Of Human Skeleton

31085 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 930am-1100am SAC 5.172
show description

This course introduces the student to an in-depth study of the human skeleton. Class sessions combine lecture and laboratory sessions and cover topics including developmental biology, functional morphology, and skeletal identification, with a special focus on the latter skill as it relates to forensics and archaeological studies. Students will also be introduced to new 3D imaging techniques for studying the skeleton. 

This class requires both intensive in-class and out-of-class preparation. Participants must be prepared to handle actual human osteological specimens and have a professional approach to this subject and the human remains. An interest in human skeletal identification is especially applicable to the fields of archeology, physical anthropology, health sciences, law, and law enforcement.

ANT 301 • Physical Anthro (Self-Paced)

31060 • Spring 2011
Meets
show description

INTRODUCTION:  This course is designed to introduce students to physical anthropology.  During the course you will investigate numerous and diverse subjects that include an introduction to modern evolutionary theory, sexual reproduction, human genetics, variation in populations of modern humans, mammalian phylogeny, primate behavior, biology, and ecology, the fossil record of primate and human evolution, and archaeology.SELF-PACED FEATURE:  To successfully complete this course, the student must be able to learn the material without the benefit of a lecture and laboratory session.  The only meeting of the course is the initial orientation meeting.  Students are responsible for setting their own proper study and examination pace for the course.  This class is not less time consuming than other classes, but it permits you to arrange your time according to your own schedule.  You can finish this course before the end of the semester by working in a more concentrated manner early in the semester.

ANT 301 • Physical Anthro (Self-Paced)

29825 • Fall 2010
Meets
show description

This course is designed as an introduction to the study of physical anthropology. During the semester you will investigate numerous and diverse subjects including modern evolutionary theory, sexual reproduction, human genetics, biological variation in populations of modern humans, mammalian phylogeny, primate behavior, biology, and ecology, the fossil record of primate and human evolution, and archaeology. The diversity of these topics will illustrate how the different areas of physical anthropology are integrated and will offer you an understanding of the place of humans in the world. 

ANT 301 • Physical Anthro (Self-Paced)

30010 • Spring 2010
Meets
show description

 This course is an introduction to the principles and the methods of physical anthropology.  Physical anthropology is the study of human beings in a biological context, and seeks to explain our relationship to other primates and to the rest of the natural world.  In other words, who are we? how are we unique? how, why, an when did we come to be the way we are?The study of physical anthropology requires many different types of knowledge.  Throughout the course, we will examine anatomical, behavioral, and genetic similarities and differences among living primates, learn the basic mechanisms of the evolutionary process, and trace a pathway of human evolution as reconstructed from the fossil record.  The main goal of the course is to obtain a clear understanding of our place in nature.

ANT 348 • Human Origins And Evolution

30420-30435 • Spring 2010
Meets MW 100pm-200pm EPS 2.102
show description

This course examines the evidence for the origin and evolution of humans with particular emphasis placed on reconstructing the paleobiology of extinct hominins.  Lectures will draw upon a diverse range of disciplines (anatomy, archaeology, ecology, ethology, genetics, geology, paleontology) and integrate these into a framework for understanding the origin and evolutionary history of this unusual group of primates.  Weekly laboratories provide the student with an opportunity to examine firsthand the fossil evidence for human evolution.

ANT 301 • Physical Anthro (Self-Paced)

30155 • Fall 2009
Meets
show description

Anthropology 301 Fall 2009 (unique no. 30155

Introduction to Physical Anthropology (Self-Paced) 

 


COURSE WEBSITE: http://www.utexas.edu/courses/physanthro/ 

PLEASE READ THIS SYLLABUS CAREFULLY AND ENTIRELY. YOUR SUCCESSFUL COMPLETION OF THIS COURSE DEPENDS UPON YOUR KNOWLEDGE OF THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS SYLLABUS!! 

Students with disabilities may request appropriate academic accommodations from the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities, 471-6259. 

COURSE E-MAIL ADDRESS: sp301@uts.cc.utexas.edu 

Include your last name in the "Subject" field and be sure you include your UT EID in the body of the email message. 

INSTRUCTOR: Dr. John Kappelman. Office Hours: Tu Th 11-12 pm in EPS 2.132, or by appointment; office telephone: 471-0055 

TEACHING ASSISTANTS: Hannah Baker, Saikat Maitra, and Angel Zeininger. Office hours are held in EPS 2.103 during review hours (see page 7 of this syllabus). 

INTRODUCTION: This course is designed as an introduction to the study of physical anthropology. During the semester you will investigate numerous and diverse subjects including modern evolutionary theory, sexual reproduction, human genetics, biological variation in populations of modern humans, mammalian phylogeny, primate behavior, biology, and ecology, the fossil record of primate and human evolution, and archaeology. The diversity of these topics will illustrate how the different areas of physical anthropology are integrated and will offer you an understanding of the place of humans in the world. 

To successfully complete this course, the student must be able to learn the material without the benefit of a lecture and laboratory session. The only meeting of the course is the initial orientation meeting. Students are responsible for setting their own proper study pace for the course, but must comply with due dates for the exams and assignments. This class is not less time consuming than other classes, but it permits the student some latitude in arranging their study and testing schedule. The course may be completed before the end of the semester by working in a more concentrated manner and testing before the due dates. Any student who has not completed the first exam and first three labs by their due dates will receive zeros for these assignments. 

As with any course, all of the work submitted in this course must be that of each individual student. Students ARE NOT permitted to collaborate in the completion of laboratory assignments by sharing answers, nor are they permitted to assist each other by sharing questions or answers from the examinations. Any violation of this policy will be treated as cheating and will be referred to UT’s office of student judicial services for investigation and disciplinary action. Students will be required to sign a policy compliance statement at the beginning of the semester which states that they agree to follow these rules and understand the serious nature of any violation. 

REQUIRED TEXTBOOKS: The following materials are required for the course: 

Essentials of Physical Anthropology, Jurmain, Nelson, Kilgore, & Trevathan, 2009, 7th edition (new and updated). NOTE: the title and cover of the 3-ring binder version of the book for this course are different from the book that is used for the lecture version of Ant 301. Be sure to purchase the correct book! 

Virtual Laboratories for Physical Anthropology, Kappelman, 2007, Version 4. Labs are on-line with a student pass code that is included with the book. The log-in site is: http://west.ilrn.com/ilrn/authentication/welcome.do 

REQUIREMENTS: The requirements for this class include: 

Ten computer exams based on readings from the textbook, Essentials of Physical Anthropology. All ten exams based on the textbook are completed in the Physical Anthropology Computer Lab (EPS 2.103). Sign-up sheets for reserving testing times are available on a bulletin board outside the classroom (EPS 2.103). There are DEADLINE DUE DATES for these exams. See page 4 of this syllabus for deadlines. 

 

Twelve lab assignments are based on the Virtual Laboratories for Physical Anthropology. Again, these assignments have DEADLINE DUE DATES. The assignment is completed by downloading each assignment from the course website and then emailing the file to the course email address as an attachment. See page 6 of this syllabus for the deadlines and detailed instructions. 

The Virtual Laboratories assignments are completed via the web on PC-compatible computers running Windows. Do not try to complete your assignments on a Macintosh computer. The 12 lab assignments are available for downloading from the course web site. The Undergraduate Student Microcomputer Facility (SMF: Flawn Academic Center, FAC 212) has a large number of computers available for use by undergraduates. If you do not already have an account there, it is strongly recommended that you set one up so that you can use these computers. We do not recommend using public computer clusters other than the Undergraduate Student Microcomputer Facility. You must know how to send an attached document using your UT email address. 

A valid UT email address is required for submission of the twelve Virtual Lab assignments (see #2 above and page 6 below). If you do not already have a UT email account, you can sign up for one by going to http://www.utexas.edu/computer/email/ Students who have used non-UT email accounts (including Hotmail, Yahoo, AOL, and Gmail) to submit their lab assignments have experienced numerous difficulties. 

 

Students must complete a “Check Status” four times during the semester. Check Status is done in the testing lab and shows you your progress and grade in the course up to that date. You may Check Status during testing lab hours as frequently as you like, but you are required to Check Status on at least four occasions: 

a) You must Check Status after completing Exam 2 and Lab Assignment 3 but no later than 18 Sept, and before you proceed to Exam 3 or Lab 4. 

b) You must Check Status again after completing Exam 5 and Lab Assignment 6 but no later than 16 Oct, and before you proceed to Exam 6 or Lab 7. 

c) You must Check Status after completing Exam 7 and Lab Assignment 9 but no later than 6 Nov, and before you proceed to Exam 8 or Lab 10. 

d) You must Check Status again after completing Exam 9 but no later than 25 Nov, and before you proceed to Exam 10. 

 

Course Website: http://www.utexas.edu/courses/physanthro/ 

The course website is designed to aid you in completing the course. It is strongly suggested that you visit the site frequently and at least weekly to view any announcements posted to the bulletin board. In addition to the complete 

syllabus, the website contains links to interesting sites related to physical anthropology. Most importantly, the class web site also allows you to complete your Virtual Lab assignments for the email submission as an attachment. 

We only use the Blackboard course manager for posting a copy of the syllabus for this course 

EXAMS 

All information in the Jurmain et al. textbook is considered fair game for the exams. Be sure to read all of the material carefully, including figures and the "boxes" which highlight certain important historical and scientific events. In order to answer some of the multiple-choice questions, you will be required to work Punnett squares (Mendelian genetics), complete phylogenies and timelines, and identify bones and features in figures and plots. 

The testing lab opens on 2 September 2009 

A WORD OF CAUTION: exam deadlines fall on Fridays. It is best to complete testing earlier in the week before the Friday deadline because of potential overcrowding on Fridays. Unless you have reserved a testing time slot in advance, you will NOT BE ABLE TO COMPLETE AN EXAM ON FRIDAY. 

EXAMS MUST BE TAKEN IN NUMERICAL ORDER! 

Exam 1 = chapters 1 and 2 

Exam 6 = chapter 9 

Exam 2 = chapters 3 and 4 

Exam 7 = chapter 10 

Exam 3 = chapter 5 

Exam 8 = chapter 11 

Exam 4 = chapters 6 and 7 

Exam 9 = chapters 12 and 13 

Exam 5 = chapter 8 

Exam 10 = chapter 14 

 

 

 

ANT 366 • Anat And Bio Of Human Skeleton

30535 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 830-1100 EPS 2.102
show description

ANATOMY AND BIOLOGY OF THE HUMAN SKELETON 

 

ANTHROPOLOGY 366 (30535) FALL 2009 


INSTRUCTOR: Prof. John Kappelman (jkappelman@mail.utexas.edu

Office: EPS 2.132, telephone: 471-0055 

Office hours: Tu Th 10-11 pm or by appointment 

CLASS MEETINGS 

Tu and Th: 8:30 – 11.00 am in EPS 2.102 (10-11 am: self-study in the lab) 

PRERQUSITES 

Anthropology 301 and six semester hours of upper-division coursework in natural or social science, or permission of the instructor. 

Students with disabilities may request appropriate academic accommodations from the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities, 471-6259. 

 

DESCRIPTION (see the Blackboard course website: click HERE

This course introduces the student to an in-depth study of the human skeleton. Class sessions combine lecture and laboratory sessions and cover topics including developmental biology, functional morphology, and skeletal identification, with a special focus on the latter skill as it relates to forensics and archaeological studies. Students will also be introduced to new 3D imaging techniques for studying the skeleton. 

This class requires both intensive in-class and out-of-class preparation. Participants must be prepared to handle actual human osteological specimens and have a professional approach to this subject and the human remains. An interest in human skeletal identification is especially applicable to the fields of archeology, physical anthropology, health sciences, law, and law enforcement. 

GRADING REQUIREMENTS 

Laboratory quizzes (there is no final exam): 60% 

Term project: 25% 

Class and Lab Participation (attendance counts!): 15% 

Grades (rounding to whole number, with + and -): A 90-100% 

 

B 80-89% 

C 70-79% 

D 60-69% 

F <60% 

TEXTBOOKS AND ELECTRONIC MEDIA 

Steele and Bramblett, 1988. The Anatomy and Biology of the Human Skeleton. Texas A&M University Press, College Station, TX. (Note: the vocabulary of this text is used.) 

Bass, 1995. Human Osteology. Special Publication No. 2, Missouri Archaeological Society, Columbia, MO. 

Buikstra and Uberlaker, 1994. Standards for Data Collection from Human Skeletal Remains. 

See www.eSkeletons.org for a web-based version of the human and primate skeleton. 

Almost launched: www.eForensics.info 

 

Topic Schedule 

Aug. 27 Brief introduction to the course 

Students must schedule a 10-minute office hour appointment with Prof. K on 1 or 8 September. 

Sept. 1 Bone biology, and introduction to the study materials 

Sept. 3 The Skull 

Sept. 8 The Skull (cont.) 

Sept. 10 QUIZ: The Skull 

The Vertebra 

Sept. 15 The Vertebra (cont.) 

Sept. 17 QUIZ: The Vertebra 

The Chest 

Sept. 22 The Chest (cont.) 

Sept. 24 QUIZ: The Chest 

The Arm 

Sept. 29 The Arm (cont.) 

Oct. 1 QUIZ: The Arm 

The Hand 

Oct. 6 The Hand (cont.) 

Oct. 8 QUIZ: The Hand 

The Pelvis 

Oct. 13 The Pelvis (cont.) 

Oct. 15 QUIZ: The Pelvis 

The Leg 

Oct. 20 The Leg (cont.) 

Oct. 22 QUIZ: The Leg 

The Foot 

Oct. 27 The Foot (cont.) 

Oct. 29 QUIZ: The Foot 

The Dentition 

Nov. 3 The Dentition (cont.) 

Nov. 5 QUIZ: The Dentition 

2

Applications: 3D imaging 

Nov. 10 Applications: estimation of sex and age 

Nov. 12 Applications: estimation of stature 

Nov. 17 Term project 

Nov. 19 Term project (cont.) 

Nov. 24 Term project (cont.) 

Nov. 26-28 Thanksgiving Holidays (no class meetings) 

Dec. 1 Term project (cont.) 

Dec. 3 Term project (cont.) 

IMPORTANT DATES AND DEADLINES TO REMEMBER: 

31 August: Last day of official add/drop period 

11 September: Twelfth Class Day 

23 September: Last day to DROP course without possible academic penalty 

21 October: Last day to withdraw or change pass/fail status 

26-28 November Thanksgiving holidays 

4 December: Last day of class 

ANT 301 • Physical Anthro (Self-Paced)

29560 • Spring 2009
Meets
show description

 This course is an introduction to the principles and the methods of physical anthropology.  Physical anthropology is the study of human beings in a biological context, and seeks to explain our relationship to other primates and to the rest of the natural world.  In other words, who are we? how are we unique? how, why, an when did we come to be the way we are?The study of physical anthropology requires many different types of knowledge.  Throughout the course, we will examine anatomical, behavioral, and genetic similarities and differences among living primates, learn the basic mechanisms of the evolutionary process, and trace a pathway of human evolution as reconstructed from the fossil record.  The main goal of the course is to obtain a clear understanding of our place in nature.

ANT 348 • Human Origins And Evolution

29950-29965 • Spring 2009
Meets MW 100pm-200pm EPS 2.102
show description

This course examines the evidence for the origin and evolution of humans with particular emphasis placed on reconstructing the paleobiology of extinct hominins.  Lectures will draw upon a diverse range of disciplines (anatomy, archaeology, ecology, ethology, genetics, geology, paleontology) and integrate these into a framework for understanding the origin and evolutionary history of this unusual group of primates.  Weekly laboratories provide the student with an opportunity to examine firsthand the fossil evidence for human evolution.

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