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Dr. Martha Selby, Chair 120 INNER CAMPUS DR STOP G9300 WCH 4.134 78712-1251 • 512-471-5811

Sung-Sheng (Yvonne) Chang

Professor Ph.D., Stanford University

Sung-Sheng (Yvonne) Chang

Contact

  • Phone: 512-475-6036
  • Office: WCH 4.124
  • Office Hours: FALL 2014: T 2:20-3:20; Th 5-7
  • Campus Mail Code: G9300

Biography

Courses taught:
Undergraduate: Chinese Film and Literature; Classical Chinese Poetry (Chinese); Chinese Fiction from Taiwan; Prose Writings by Lu Xun (Chinese); Film and Literature from Taiwan; Modern Chinese Literature

Graduate:  High and Popular Culture in China; Aestheticism and Modernism in East Asia; Encountering Modernity: Film and Literature from Taiwan; Critical Scholarship on Modern Chinese Literature and Culture; Development of the Literary Field in Modern Chinese Societies

Interests

Chinese film and literature

CHI 340 • Prose Writings By Lu Xun

32245 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm BUR 128
show description

 

The class will read selected prose writings by Lu Xun (1881-1936), who is widely recognized as the most important modern Chinese writer, and whose trenchant cultural criticism have exerted profound influence over generations of Chinese intellectuals.  Class time will be divided between close reading and analysis of the Chinese texts and discussion of Lu Xun’s ideas, writing style, and critical views of Chinese history and society.    

 

This course is part of the CHI 340 series on Advanced Chinese Language and Literature that are designed to enhance the students’ knowledge of Chinese literature, culture, and history through reading selected texts in the Chinese original.  To enroll in this class, a student should have completed three years of college-level Chinese language courses at an American institution, or their equivalents.  Heritage students with an equivalent knowledge in the Chinese language and a serious interest in learning about the subject may also be eligible to enroll (please email the instructor for details). 

 

Class preparation and participation in class discussion are extremely important.  Three equally weighted tests will be given.  The texts will include 1) translation from Chinese into English and 2) essay questions on the contents of Lu Xun’s writings, to be answered in Chinese.   In addition, each student will be asked to do one oral report during the semester.  Attendance is extremely important; more than three absences will significantly lower your final grade.  

 

Pre-requisite: CHI 320L in residence or instructor’s consent. 

ANS 385 • Lit Fields: Mod China/Taiwan

32265 • Spring 2014
Meets M 400pm-700pm CMA 3.108
show description

Study of various aspects and periods of Chinese language and literature.  Specific offerings are listed in the Course Schedule.  Prerequisite: Graduate standing; additional prerequisites vary with the topic and are given in the Course Schedule.

CHI 340 • Contemporary Chinese Lit

32570 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm BUR 128
show description

Study of Chinese literary texts in the original.  Specific offerings listed in the Course Schedule.  Prerequisite: Chinese 320L with a grade of at least C.

CHI 340 • Chinese Fiction From Taiwan

32245 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm BUR 128
show description

Study of Chinese literary texts in the original.  Specific offerings listed in the Course Schedule.  Prerequisite: Chinese 320L with a grade of at least C.

CHI 340 • Classical Chinese Poetry

32135 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm BUR 128
show description

The class will read traditional style Chinese poetry from the Pre-Qin, Han, the Six Dynasties, and the Tang periods, as well as some poems of the ci genre from the Song Dynasty.  To enroll in this class, the students should have completed three years of college-level Chinese language courses at an American institution, or the equivalents.  Some knowledge about the grammatical features of classical Chinese is preferred but not required.  Class time will be divided between translating the poems into English and analyzing their aesthetic features.  In addition to two papers (one mid-term and one final), there will be quizzes on reading assignments and poetry memorization.

            Class preparation is extremely important.  More than three absences will significantly lower your final grade.  

 

Grading

Class preparation      40 %

Papers     45% (20% for mid-term; 25% for final)

Quizzes and memorization    15%

 

Textbooks

Jeannette Faurot, Drinking with the Moon: A Guide to Classical Chinese Poetry

Xeroxed course packet (Paradigm Copy Shop; 407 W. 24th St., Tel. 472-7986)

Burton Watson, Chinese Lyricism: Shih Poetry from the Second to the Twelfth Century

 

ANS 385 • Lit/Cul Schs: Mod China/Taiwan

31735 • Fall 2012
Meets M 400pm-700pm UTC 4.114
(also listed as CHI 384 )
show description

Course Description:

 CHI 384/ANS 385 Literary/Cultural Scholarships: Modern China and Taiwan   

This survey course introduces critical scholarships on modern and contemporary literature and culture from China and Taiwan.  The goal is to familiarize doctoral students in the ACL (Asian Cultures and Languages) program with the history of our field, as part of their preparation for the Comprehensive Exam.  We will adopt a chronological approach and examine representative scholarly writings in the field since the mid-20th century.  Special attention will be paid to critical methodologies and underlying theoretical assumptions.  Among other things, we will try to contemplate such thorny issues as how recent geopolitical changes, technological advances, and paradigmatic shifts in the humanities have significantly affected the academic practices and disciplinary identities in our field.  One such impact is precisely the blurring of conventional disciplinary boundaries.  As a consequence, besides literature, our readings will include such diverse cultural genres as film, popular music, urban space, media sphere, etc..

Textbook:

Course packet and electronic attachments to Blackboard  

Grading:

Term paper  50%

Class participation  30%

Reports    20%

Selected chapters from the following books:

 

  1. Hsia, C. T.  A History of Modern Chinese Fiction.  New Haven & London:  Yale University Press, 1961. 
  2. Lee, Leo Ou-fan.  The Romantic Generation of Modern Chinese Writers.  Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard UP, 1973.
  3. Prusek, Jaroslav.  The Lyrical and the Epic: Studies of Modern Chinese Literature. Bloomington: Indiana UP, 1980.
  4. Gunn, Edward M..  The Unwelcome Muse: Chinese Literature in Shanghai and Beijing, 1937-1945 New York : Columbia University Press, 1980.
  5. Link, E. Perry.  Mandarin Ducks and Butterflies: Popular Fiction in Early Twentieth-century Chinese Cities.  Berkeley: Univ. of California Press, 1981.
  6. Anderson, Marston.  The Limits of Realism.  Berkeley:  Univ. of California Press, 1990. 
  7. Wang, Dewei.  Fictional Realism in Twentieth-century China, Mao Dun, Lao She, Shen Congwen.  New York:  Columbia University Press, 1992.
  8. Chang, Sung-sheng Yvonne.  Modernism and the Nativist Resistance: Contemporary Chinese Fiction in Taiwan.  Duke UP, 1993.
  9. Chow, Rey.  Primitive Passions: Visuality, Sexuality, Ethnographpy, and Contemporary Chinese Cinema.  Columbia UP, 1995.
  10. Liu, Lydia He.  Translingual Practice: Literature, National Culture, and Translated Modernity--China, 1900-1937.  Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1995.
  11. Chen, Xiao-mei.  Occidentalism: a Theory of Counter-discourse in Post-Mao China. New York: Oxford UP, 1995.
  12. Wang, Jing.  High Culture Fever: Politics, Aesthetics, and Ideology in Deng's China. Berkeley: Univ. of California Press, 1996.
  13. Wang, Ban.  The Sublime Figure of History: Aesthetics and Politics in Twentieth-century China.  Stanford: Stanford UP, 1997.
  14. Zhang, Xudong.  Chinese Modernism in the Era of Reforms: Cultural Fever, Avant-garde Fiction, and the New Chinese Cinema. Durham: Duke UP, 1997.
  15. Tang, Xiaobing. Chinese Modern: the Heroic and the Quotidian. Durham: Duke UP,    2000.
  16. Link, Perry.  The Uses of Literature: Life in the Socialist Chinese Literary System. Princeton: Princeton UP, 2000.
  17. Shih, Shu-mei.  The Lure of the Modern: Writing Modernism in Semicolonial China, 1917-1937.  Berkeley: Univ. of California Press, 2001.
  18. Hockx, Michel.  Questions of Style: Literary Societies and Literary Journals in Modern China, 1911-1937.  Brill, 2003
  19. Chang, Sung-sheng Yvonne.  Literary Culture in Taiwan: Martial Law to Market Law. Columbia UP, 2004.
  20. Zhang, Zhen.  An Amorous History of the Silver Screen: Shanghai Cinema, 1896-1937.  U. of Chicago Press, 2005.
  21. Tsu, Jing.  Failure, Nationalism, and Literature: The Making of Modern Chinese Identity, Stanford UP, 2005.
  22. Huang, Nicole.  Women, War, Domesticity: Shanghai Literature and Popular Culture of the 1940s.  Brill, 2005.
  23. Des Forges, Alexander.  Mediasphere Shanghai: The Aesthetics of Cultural Production, University of Hawai’i Press, 2007.
  24. Shih, Shu-mei. Visuality and Identity: Sinophone Articulations across the Pacific (Asia Pacific Modern). University of California Press; 2007.
  25. Kong, Shuyu, Consuming Literature: Best Sellers and the Commercialization of Literary Production in Contemporary China.  Stanford: Stanford UP, 2005.
  26. Button, Peter.  Configurations of the Real in Chinese Literary and Aesthetic Modernity.  Brill, 2009.
  27. Rojas, Carlos.  The Naked Gaze: Reflections on Chinese Modernity.  Harvard University asian Center, 2009.

 

 

 

CHI 340 • Modern Chinese Literature

32040 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm BUR 128
show description

This is a fourth-year level Chinese language class.  To enroll in this class, students should have an equivalent of three years of college-level Chinese language education at an American institution.  If you are not sure whether you are at the right level for this class, please contact the Instructor by e-mail.

 The class will read prose works selected from the Republican Period of modern Chinese history (1919-1949).  Readings will include stories written by such important authors as Lu Xun, Shen Congwen, Mao Dun, and Zhang Ailing.  Class time will be divided between translation and linguistic analysis of pre-assigned parts of the texts, and discussion of these texts as cultural and literary products within the particular socio-historical contexts.  While English translation of the stories will be included in the course packet to facilitate literary discussion, the students are responsible for looking up in dictionary every word of the assigned passages and know their exact meaning and correct pronunciation before coming to each class. 

 Class performance counts 45% toward the final grade.  Three equally weighted tests, consisting of both the language and the literature components, will be given.  Each student will be asked to do one oral report during the semester.  More than three absences in the entire semester will significantly affect the final grade. 

Pre-requisite: CHI 320L in residence or instructor’s consent.

Grading policies:     

Grades will be based on:

(a)  Class preparation and participation (45%)

(b)  Three equally weighted tests (45%)

(c)   One oral report (10%)

Plus/minus grades will be assigned for the final grade.  Absences exceeding the allowed quota may result in automatic dropping of the final grade by one or more levels.

Course materials: 

(a)  Xeroxed course packet (available at Paradigm Copy Shop; 407 W. 24th St., Tel. 472-7986)

(b)  Lu Xun xiao shuo ji, vocabulary: selected short stories of Lu Xun (available at the

       University Co-op)

CHI 384 • Lit/Cul Schs: Mod China/Taiwan

32055 • Fall 2012
Meets M 400pm-700pm UTC 4.114
(also listed as ANS 385 )
show description

Course Description:

 CHI 384/ANS 385 Literary/Cultural Scholarships: Modern China and Taiwan   

This survey course introduces critical scholarships on modern and contemporary literature and culture from China and Taiwan.  The goal is to familiarize doctoral students in the ACL (Asian Cultures and Languages) program with the history of our field, as part of their preparation for the Comprehensive Exam.  We will adopt a chronological approach and examine representative scholarly writings in the field since the mid-20th century.  Special attention will be paid to critical methodologies and underlying theoretical assumptions.  Among other things, we will try to contemplate such thorny issues as how recent geopolitical changes, technological advances, and paradigmatic shifts in the humanities have significantly affected the academic practices and disciplinary identities in our field.  One such impact is precisely the blurring of conventional disciplinary boundaries.  As a consequence, besides literature, our readings will include such diverse cultural genres as film, popular music, urban space, media sphere, etc..

Textbook:

Course packet and electronic attachments to Blackboard  

Grading:

Term paper  50%

Class participation  30%

Reports    20%

Selected chapters from the following books:

 

  1. Hsia, C. T.  A History of Modern Chinese Fiction.  New Haven & London:  Yale University Press, 1961. 
  2. Lee, Leo Ou-fan.  The Romantic Generation of Modern Chinese Writers.  Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard UP, 1973.
  3. Prusek, Jaroslav.  The Lyrical and the Epic: Studies of Modern Chinese Literature. Bloomington: Indiana UP, 1980.
  4. Gunn, Edward M..  The Unwelcome Muse: Chinese Literature in Shanghai and Beijing, 1937-1945 New York : Columbia University Press, 1980.
  5. Link, E. Perry.  Mandarin Ducks and Butterflies: Popular Fiction in Early Twentieth-century Chinese Cities.  Berkeley: Univ. of California Press, 1981.
  6. Anderson, Marston.  The Limits of Realism.  Berkeley:  Univ. of California Press, 1990. 
  7. Wang, Dewei.  Fictional Realism in Twentieth-century China, Mao Dun, Lao She, Shen Congwen.  New York:  Columbia University Press, 1992.
  8. Chang, Sung-sheng Yvonne.  Modernism and the Nativist Resistance: Contemporary Chinese Fiction in Taiwan.  Duke UP, 1993.
  9. Chow, Rey.  Primitive Passions: Visuality, Sexuality, Ethnographpy, and Contemporary Chinese Cinema.  Columbia UP, 1995.
  10. Liu, Lydia He.  Translingual Practice: Literature, National Culture, and Translated Modernity--China, 1900-1937.  Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1995.
  11. Chen, Xiao-mei.  Occidentalism: a Theory of Counter-discourse in Post-Mao China. New York: Oxford UP, 1995.
  12. Wang, Jing.  High Culture Fever: Politics, Aesthetics, and Ideology in Deng's China. Berkeley: Univ. of California Press, 1996.
  13. Wang, Ban.  The Sublime Figure of History: Aesthetics and Politics in Twentieth-century China.  Stanford: Stanford UP, 1997.
  14. Zhang, Xudong.  Chinese Modernism in the Era of Reforms: Cultural Fever, Avant-garde Fiction, and the New Chinese Cinema. Durham: Duke UP, 1997.
  15. Tang, Xiaobing. Chinese Modern: the Heroic and the Quotidian. Durham: Duke UP,    2000.
  16. Link, Perry.  The Uses of Literature: Life in the Socialist Chinese Literary System. Princeton: Princeton UP, 2000.
  17. Shih, Shu-mei.  The Lure of the Modern: Writing Modernism in Semicolonial China, 1917-1937.  Berkeley: Univ. of California Press, 2001.
  18. Hockx, Michel.  Questions of Style: Literary Societies and Literary Journals in Modern China, 1911-1937.  Brill, 2003
  19. Chang, Sung-sheng Yvonne.  Literary Culture in Taiwan: Martial Law to Market Law. Columbia UP, 2004.
  20. Zhang, Zhen.  An Amorous History of the Silver Screen: Shanghai Cinema, 1896-1937.  U. of Chicago Press, 2005.
  21. Tsu, Jing.  Failure, Nationalism, and Literature: The Making of Modern Chinese Identity, Stanford UP, 2005.
  22. Huang, Nicole.  Women, War, Domesticity: Shanghai Literature and Popular Culture of the 1940s.  Brill, 2005.
  23. Des Forges, Alexander.  Mediasphere Shanghai: The Aesthetics of Cultural Production, University of Hawai’i Press, 2007.
  24. Shih, Shu-mei. Visuality and Identity: Sinophone Articulations across the Pacific (Asia Pacific Modern). University of California Press; 2007.
  25. Kong, Shuyu, Consuming Literature: Best Sellers and the Commercialization of Literary Production in Contemporary China.  Stanford: Stanford UP, 2005.
  26. Button, Peter.  Configurations of the Real in Chinese Literary and Aesthetic Modernity.  Brill, 2009.
  27. Rojas, Carlos.  The Naked Gaze: Reflections on Chinese Modernity.  Harvard University asian Center, 2009.

 

 

 

ANS 372 • Chinese Film And Literature

31785 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm MEZ 1.216
(also listed as C L 323 )
show description

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.  Some topics partially fulfill legislative requirement for American history.  Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

CHI 340 • Prose Writings By Lu Xun

32075 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm CAL 323
show description

Study of Chinese literary texts in the original.  Specific offerings listed in the Course Schedule.  Prerequisite: Chinese 320L with a grade of at least C.

ANS 390 • Approaches To E Asian Comp Lit

31620 • Fall 2011
Meets M 400pm-700pm UTC 4.114
(also listed as C L 382 )
show description

Description:  In this class we will explore a new terrain of literary and cultural studies within the “global/local” framework.  We will look into the viability and potential contribution of an “East Asian comparative literature.”  Our focus will be placed primarily on the modern period.  While many dominant literary forms in modern East Asia have been imported from the West in the last century, along with other modern institutions, this line of inquiry acquires new significance today, as accelerated globalization has created a booming East Asian cultural market and increased intra-Asia cultural flows.  Our approach will be both historical and theoretical.  We will read selected literary works from different modern East Asian countries and examine their relations with nation-building, colonialism, imperialism, war, revolution, modernization, globalization, and digital revolution.  We will also study theoretical writings and critical paradigms in search for useful frameworks that would facilitate meaningful comparisons of different national traditions of literature in modern East Asia.  Needless, an important component of the course will be on the circulation of such aesthetic trends as realism, naturalism, modernism, and postmodernism in East Asia and their relationships with western sources of inspiration.  The class will read the literary texts either in the original language that individual groups of students are familiar with or in the English translation.  Readings in literary theories will be in English. 

The class will read modern and modernist literary works from China, Taiwan, Japan, Hong Kong and Korea.  It will also study theories on comparative literature and try to construct theoretical frameworks that  address special features of Western-influenced literary writings in modern East Asia.

CHI 340 • Chinese Fiction From Taiwan

31925 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm UTC 4.120
show description

Course description:

   This is a fourth-year level Chinese language class.  The class will read works of fiction produced in contemporary Taiwan (1949-present) in the Chinese original.  Readings will include the mainstream literature, stories written by writers of the Modernist and Nativist schools, and urban fiction since the late twentieth century.  The course is designed to meet the goals of both advanced language learning and literary appreciation.  In addition to translating selected parts of the texts into English, the class will analyze the literary techniques and examine the social, cultural, and political implications of the literary works. 

  There will be three equally weighted tests and one oral report.  Class preparation and regular attendance are extremely important.  More than three absences in the entire semester would significantly lower the final grade.

Grading:

45 %       Class preparation; participation in discussion

45 %       Tests (15% each)                                                                

10 %       Oral report 

 
Textbook:

Course packet                        

 

 

ANS 385 • Mod Inst Lit In China & Taiwan

32020 • Spring 2011
Meets M 400pm-700pm UTC 1.142
(also listed as CHI 384 )
show description

This class will begin by introducing the basics of sociologically oriented theories of literature, in particular
theories of the field of cultural production and studies of literature as a modern social institution. This will be
followed by two types of readings: first, primary literary texts from China and Taiwan since the early 20thcentury;
second, non-literary writings that shed lights on the social, political, and intellectual backgrounds of
these works. Through carefully examining the processes and mechanisms of admission and rejection of these
works by the official canons, and by situating them within the cultural fields of different types of modern and
contemporary Chinese societies, we hope to achieve a better understanding of the complex and convoluted
trajectories along which “literature” as a modern institution has been entrenched. Ultimately, we hope to
reconceptualize the history of modern Chinese literature by taking serious account of the abrupt, and often
violent, changes of its institutional environments--changes driven by war, revolution, colonization, and major
shifts in the social, political, and economic systems.

TEXTS:

Course packet

GRADING:

Term paper 60%
Class participation 25%
Reports 15%

CHI 384 • Mod Inst Lit In China & Taiwan

32335 • Spring 2011
Meets M 400pm-700pm UTC 1.142
(also listed as ANS 385 )
show description

This class will begin by introducing the basics of sociologically oriented theories of literature, in particular
theories of the field of cultural production and studies of literature as a modern social institution. This will be
followed by two types of readings: first, primary literary texts from China and Taiwan since the early 20thcentury;
second, non-literary writings that shed lights on the social, political, and intellectual backgrounds of
these works. Through carefully examining the processes and mechanisms of admission and rejection of these
works by the official canons, and by situating them within the cultural fields of different types of modern and
contemporary Chinese societies, we hope to achieve a better understanding of the complex and convoluted
trajectories along which “literature” as a modern institution has been entrenched. Ultimately, we hope to
reconceptualize the history of modern Chinese literature by taking serious account of the abrupt, and often
violent, changes of its institutional environments--changes driven by war, revolution, colonization, and major
shifts in the social, political, and economic systems.

TEXTS:

Course packet

GRADING:

Term paper 60%
Class participation 25%
Reports 15%

CHI 340 • Contemporary Chinese Lit

31160 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm CAL 323
show description

This is a fourth-year level Chinese language class. The class will read fiction works from contemporary
China in the original language. Readings will include fiction works by writers of the “root-seeking” and
avant-garde schools of the post-Mao era (the late 1970s to late 1980s) and the more popular prose
writings produced in China's rapidly commercializing cultural environment since the 1990s. The course is
designed to meet the goals of both advanced language learning and literary appreciation. Historical and
socio-political backgrounds will be introduced and serve as basis for class discussions. There will be
three equally weighted tests and one oral report. Class preparation and regular attendance are
extremely important. More than three absences would significantly lower one's final grade.

TEXTS:

Course packet

GRADING:

45 % Preparation and participation in class discussion
45 % Tests (15% each)
10 % Oral report

ANS 372 • Chinese Film And Literature

30995 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 1100-1230pm MEZ 1.102
(also listed as C L 323 )
show description

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.  Some topics partially fulfill legislative requirement for American history.  Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

CHI 340 • Prose Writings By Lu Xun

31430 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm CAL 323
show description

Prose Writing by Lu Xun

CHI 340

 31430

Spring 2010

 

Class Times: TTH 2:00 – 3:30         Location: CAL 323

 

Instructor: Sung-sheng Yvonne Chang, Professor

Office: WCH 4.124    E-mail: yvonne@mail.utexas.edu

                                       Office Hours: T 3:30 - 5:30: Th 3:30-4:30

 

 

I.               Course Description

 

The class will read selected prose writings by Lu Xun (1881-1936), who is considered by many to be the most important modern Chinese writer, and whose trenchant cultural criticism exerted influence over several generations of Chinese intellectuals.  Class time will be divided between close reading and analysis of the Chinese texts and discussion of Lu Xun’s ideas and writing styles.  In addition, a few representative English-language background readings and critical studies of Lu Xun will be assigned. 

 

This course is part of the CHI 340 series on Advanced Chinese Language and Literature that are designed to enhance the students’ knowledge of Chinese literature, culture, and history through an in-depth examination of the primary texts.  To enroll in this class, a student should have completed three years of college-level Chinese language courses at an American institution, or their equivalents.  Heritage students with an equivalent knowledge in the Chinese language and a serious interest in learning about the subject may also be eligible to enroll (please email the instructor for details). 

 

Class preparation and participation in discussion are extremely important.  Three equally weighted tests will be given.  The texts will include 1) translation from Chinese into English and 2) essay questions on the content of Lu Xun’s writings.   In addition, each student will be asked to do one oral report during the semester.  Attendance is extremely important; more than three absences will significantly lower your final grade.  

 

Pre-requisite: CHI 320L in residence or instructor’s consent.

 

II.            Structure, Format, and Procedures  

 

  • Two sets of texts will be put on E-reserve:  the Chinese texts of Lu Xun’s prose works, and the English translation of them.  Before we start working on each tale or essay, please read the entire work in English.  We will conduct a brief discussion of the content of the work in Chinese.  

 

  •  Specific passages from the Chinese texts will be assigned for close linguistic analysis and oral translation in class. The page and line numbers will be posted on the Blackboard a few days in advance.  You are expected to look up every single word that you do not already know and get their correct pronunciations before coming to class.  Be prepared to read aloud the sentences and translate them into English in a somewhat fluent fashion. 

 

  • You may consult the English version of the work while preparing the assigned passages at home.  However, you must try to understand each word and its usages, as well as the grammatical pattern of the sentences, and come up with a translation that is closer to the Chinese original in a linguistic sense.  It is unacceptable if you simply read off from the English translation given in the course packet when called upon to translate in class.

 

  •  Three class periods will be devoted to oral reports (please see the Schedule for the exact dates).  Each presenter will prepare a polished written draft of the report and make enough copies for everyone in class. 

 

  • Depending on the size of the class, the presentation should run between 7 and 10 minutes.   Please do not read from your notes.  Try to speak naturally about the subject.  Everyone in the audience must prepare two “intelligent” questions about the work, and be prepared to ask them in Chinese in the discussion session following the reports.

 

  •  There will be three equally weighted tests.  Each test will include at least two parts: translation and essay questions.  Essay questions have to be answered in Chinese.  The answer can be just a short paragraph, consisting of a few sentences.  You may write in either the traditional or the simplified form.  A good way of preparing for the essay questions is to get into the habit of jotting down your thoughts on the works in Chinese throughout the semester.  You may also consult any background readings you can find, but must write up the draft in your own language. 

 

  • Since this is the most advanced Chinese class offered in our program, we tend to have students with very different backgrounds.  If you feel that your proficiency is not as good as some of your classmates, do not be overly concerned.  Progress you make during the semester will be taken into serious consideration in grading.  What I care most is how much you learn from this class, so you will be essentially competing with yourself.

 

III.         Grading Policies

        

Grades will be based on:

a). Class preparation (35%)

b). Participation in class discussion (10%)

c). Three equally weighted tests (45%)

d). One oral report (10%)

 

Plus/minus grades will be assigned for the final grade.  Absences exceeding the allowed quota may result in automatic dropping of the final grade by one or more levels.

 

IV.          Course Materials

 

Selections of both primary texts and background readings will be placed on e-reserve. 

Password: luxun

 

Primary texts:

Lu Xun quanji (Complete works of Lu Xun). 16 vols. Beijing: Renmin wenxue, 1981.

Lu Xun xiao shuo ji, vocabulary: selected short stories of Lu Xun.  Translated by D. C. Lau.   Hong Kong: Chinese University Press, 1979.

Lu Xun Selected Works. 4 vols. Beijing: Foreign Languages Press, 1980.

Diary of a Madman and Other Stories. trs. William Lyell. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 1990.

The Real Story of Ah-Q and Other Tales of China: The Complete Fiction of Lu Xun.  Translated by Julia Lovell.  Penguin Classics, 2010.

 

Background readings:

Leo Ou-fan Lee, Voices from the Iron House: A Study of Lu Xun. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1987.

Lee, Leo Ou-fan, ed. Lu Xun and His Legacy. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1985.

 

       

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**Documented Disability Statement

Any student with a documented disability who requires academic accommodations should contact Services for Students with Disabilities at 471-6259 (voice) or 1-866-329-3986 (Video Phone) as soon as possible to request an official letter outlining authorized accommodations.

 

 

ANS 372 • Film & Literature From Taiwan

31140 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 1100-1230pm BEN 1.124
show description

Film and Literature from Taiwan

 

Re-revised Schedule 

(September 25, 2009)

 

 

Week 1

Aug. 27 Introduction 

 

Part I         Japanese Occupation and the Retrocession of Taiwan

 

Modern Taiwanese Literature from the 1920s to the 1940s

 

Week 2 Historical overview; cultural resistance of two generations of Taiwanese 

writers

Sept. 1 a. Film: Tug of War: The Story of Taiwan (WGBH Boston Special, 1998) (in-class 

    screening)

        b. Background reading: Chang, "Taiwanese New Literature and the Colonial 

    Context: A Historical Survey."  

3 a. Texts: Lai He, “Steelyard”; Yang Kui, “Newspaper Boy”; Lu Heruo, “Oxcart” 

b. Background reading: Yee, Angelina, “Writing the Colonial Self: Yang Kui’s 

Texts of Resistance and National Identity” (Optional) 

Week 3 Colonial modernity and the troubled identity quest

8 a. Texts: Weng Nao, “Remaining Snow”; Zhang Wenhuan, “Overburdened”; 

Long Yingzong, “The Lonely Bookworm”; Wang Changxiong, "Strong Currents" 

b. Background reading: Chang, “Beyond Cultural and National Identities: 

    Current Re-evaluation of the Kominka Literature from Taiwan's Japanese Period.”                10 a. Film: Viva Tonal – The Dance Age (Guo Zhendi & Jian Weisi, 2003)  

Week 4 Tumultuous years of the mid-20th century

a. Texts: Wu Zhuoliu, The Orphan of Asia (excerpts), The Fig Tree: Memoirs 

          of a Taiwanese Patriot (excerpts)(Optional); Nishikawa Misturu,Eiren’s Fan—An 

    Elegy on the February 28 Incident” (Optional)

17 a. Film: City of Sadness (Hou Hsiao-hsien, 1989)

 

 

PART II The Post-1949 Era: The Martial Law Period

 

Dominant culture and its discontent: 1950s to 1980s

 

Week 5 State-sponsored conservative mainstream culture and the incipient 

Modernist trend

22 a. Texts:  Lin Haiyin (Lin Hai-yin), “Candle”; Qi Jun (Chi Chun), “The 

   chignon”; Bai Xianyong (Pai Hsien-yung), "The Eternal Snow Beauty," 

   “Wandering in the Garden, Waking from a Dream” 

c. Background reading: Chang, Modernism and the Nativist Resistance, Ch. 1 & 2

              24 a. Films: Jade Love (Zhang Yi, 1984); Liang Shanbo yu Zhu Yingtai (Li Hanxiang, 1962)

(in-class screening of clips)            

Week 6        Criticism of accelerated modernization, neo-colonialism, and the authoritarian 

          political rule 

29 a. Texts: Wang Chen-he, "An Oxcart for Dowry" (1969); Huang Chun-ming, The Taste of 

Apples (“My Son’s Big Doll”; “The Gong”; “The Taste of Apples”) 

b.  Background reading: Chang, Modernism, Ch. 5 

      Oct. 1        a. Film: A Brighter Summer Day, Part I (Edward Yang, 1991)

Week  7          Modernism reaching maturity and critique of the dominant culture 

            6 a. Texts: Wang, Wenxing, Family Catastrophe 

            c. Background reading: Chang, Modernism, Ch. 4

            8 a. A Brighter Summer Day, Part II (Edward Yang, 1991)

            *Outline/abstract of first paper due

Week  8 Leftist idealism, nihilistic angst, and the bifurcation of nativism

          13 a. Texts: Chen Yingzhen, “Country Village Teacher,”“My First Case,” “Mountain Path”;

Guo Songfen, "Moon Seal" (first half) 

c. Background reading: Chang, Modernism, Ch. 5 

          15 a. Films: Legacy, Moon  Water (Cloudgate Dance Troup) 

            **First paper due

 

Marching toward an open society: late 1970s to late 1980s 

 

Week 9    Looking back at “our past”

20   a. Texts: Zheng Qingwen, “Three-legged Horse” (1979); Huang Fan, “Lai Suo” (1980); 

Guo Songfen, “Moon Seal” (second half)

22   a. Topic: Debunking the official story 

            b. Film: Dust in the Wind  (Hou Hsiao-hsien, 1984)

Week  10   Babyboomers coming of age 

27 a.  Texts: Zhang Dachun, “Lucky Worries About His Country,” “General’s Monument”; 

Yuan Qiongqiong, “Mulberry Seas,” “A Place of One's Own"

         b.  Background reading: Chang, “Yuan Qiongqiong and the Rage for Eileen Zhang 

             Among Taiwan's Feminine Writers” 

            29        a. Film:  The Secret Love in Peach Blossom Land (Stan Lai or Lai Sheng-chuan, 

1986)

Week 11  Crossroad on the eve of a new era: art or commerce?

     Nov. 3   a. Texts: Zhu Tianwen (Chu T’ien-wen), “Master Chai,” “Fin-de-siecle Splendor”; Li 

Yongping, “At Fortune’s Way” 

        c.  Background reading:  Chang, “Chu T'ien-wen and Taiwan's Recent Cultural and 

    Literary Trends” 

  5    a. Film: The Terrorizer  (1986)

        c. Background reading: Chang, “The Terrorizer and the ‘Great Divide’ in 

            Contemporary Taiwan’s Cultural Development” 

        *Outline/abstract for second paper due

 

PART III  The Contemporary (Post-martial law) Period

 

Late 1980s to the present

 

Week 12 Aestheticization of urban modernity and the Queer 

10 a. Texts: Zhu Tianwen, Notes of a Desolate Man (1994)

12 a. Film: Vive L’Amour (1994)

           **Second paper due

Week 13 Disillusionment with the new democracy and re-enchantment of  

cosmopolitanism

  17 a. Text: Zhu Tianxin (Chu Tien-hsin), The Old Capital 

19 a. Film: Edward Yang, Yiyi (2000)

Week 14 Searching for the “local,” reimagining the “other” 

24 a. Films, Hu Taili, Sounds of Love and Sorrow (86 min) (2000); Tang Xiangzhu, How 

  High Is the Mountain (56 min.)(2002) (*Screenings on Monday 3-5 PM, Nov. 23)

c. Presentation by Dr. Peilin Liang

d. Background readings: Chiu Kuei-fen essay on documentary and the aboriginals 

26        Thanksgiving 

Week 15 Repositioning of the self in a restructured global cultural order 

      Dec. 1 a. Chang, Hsiao-hung, “Fake Logos, Fake Theory, Fake Globalization” 

                        b. Presentation: Internet culture (Shaohua Guo)

3     a. Film: Café Lumiere (Hou Hsiao-hsien, 2004)

Course Instructor Survey

 

       Dec. 10     **Third paper due in my office (WCH 4.124) at 3:30 PM 

 

 

 

List of Films

 

Aug.    26         No screening

Sept. 1 Tug of War: The Story of Taiwan (Documentary; 1998) (90 min; in-class screening)

VID 8555

Sept.    2           No screening

Sept.    9 Viva Tonal – The Dance Age (Guo Zhendi & Jian Weisi, 2003) (104 min) 

Sept.    16 City of Sadness (1989) (Hou Hsiao-hsien, 157 min) DVD Chang 102

Sept.    23 Jade Love (Zhang Yi, 1984)

Sept.    24 Clips from Liang Shanbo yu Zhu Yingtai (Li Hanxiang, 1962) (128 min; in-class screening) 

Sept.    30 A Brighter Summer Day Part I (Edward Yang, 1991)

Oct.   1        Clips from Meihua (Liu Jiachang, 1976)(95 min; in-class screening)

Oct.        7       A Brighter Summer Day Part II (Edward Yang, 1991) 

Oct.      14 Legacy; Moon Water (Cloud Gate Dance Theater, Lin Huaimin)

Oct.    21 Dust in the Wind (1986) (Hou Hsiao-hsien, 109 min) VID 8258

Oct. 28       The Secret Love in Peach Blossom Land (Stan Lai, Performance Workshop theater group, DVD; 1986)(103 min)

Nov.   4 Kong bu fen zi (The Terrorists) (Edward Yang, 1986) (109 min) VID 10521

Nov.    11        Vive L’Amour (1994) (Tsai Ming-liang, 118 min)  DVD 182

*Wedding Banquet  (1993) (Ang Lee, 106 min) DVD 2660 (optional)

Nov. 18 Yiyi (2000) (Edward Yang, 173 min) DVD 520

Nov.     23*     *Please note this screening in on Monday, 3-5 PM, at the same room (Fine Arts

Sounds of Love and Sorrow (Hu Taili, 2000) (86 min)

Shan you duo gao (How High Is the Mountain) (Tang Xiangzhu; 2002) (56 min) DVD 

6568 

Nov.     25 No screening

Dec.     2 Café Lumiere (Hou Hsiao-hsien, 2004) (103 min) DVD 7734

CHI 340 • Modern Chinese Literature

31560 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm CAL 323
show description

Modern Chinese Literature 

 

CHI 340 

 31560 

 Fall 2009 

 

Class Times: TTH 2:00 – 3:30         Location: CAL 323 

 

Instructor: Sung-sheng Yvonne Chang, Professor 

Office: WCH 4.124    E-mail: yvonne@mail.utexas.edu 

                                       Office Hours: TTh 12:30 -1:00; T 3:30 - 5:30  

 

 

I. Course Description  

 

This is a fourth-year level Chinese language class.  To enroll in this class, students should 

have an equivalent of three years of college-level Chinese language education at an 

American institution.  If you are not sure whether you are at the right level for this class, 

please contact the Instructor by e-mail.  

 

The class will read prose works selected from the Republican Period of modern Chinese 

history (1919-1949).  Readings will include stories written by such important authors as 

Lu Xun, Shen Congwen, Mao Dun, and Zhang Ailing.  Class time will be divided 

between translation and linguistic analysis of pre-assigned parts of the texts, and 

discussion of these texts as cultural and literary products within the particular socio- 

historical contexts.  While English translation of the stories will be included in the course 

packet to facilitate literary discussion, the students are responsible for looking up in 

dictionary every word of the assigned passages and know their exact meaning and correct 

pronunciation before coming to each class.   

 

Class performance counts 45% toward the final grade.  Three equally weighted tests, 

consisting of both the language and the literature components, will be given.  Each 

student will be asked to do one oral report during the semester.  More than three absences 

in the entire semester will significantly affect the final grade.   

 

Pre-requisite: CHI 320L in residence or instructor’s consent.  

 

II. Structure, Format, and Procedures   

 

• Besides the book on Lu Xun, there are two sets of texts in the course packet: the  

Chinese texts of the stories, and their English translations.  Before we start 

working on each story, please read the entire story in English.  We will conduct a 

brief discussion of the plot of the story in Chinese.    

 

•  Specific passages from the Chinese texts will be assigned for close linguistic 

analysis and oral translation in class. The page and line numbers will be posted on 

the Blackboard a few days in advance.  You are expected to look up every single 

word that you do not already know and get their correct pronunciations before 

coming to class.  Be prepared to read aloud the sentences and translate them into 

English in a somewhat fluent fashion.   

 

• You may consult the English version of the story while preparing the assigned 

passages at home.  However, you must try to understand each word and its usages, 

as well as the grammatical pattern of the sentences, and come up with a 

translation that is closer to the Chinese original in a linguistic sense.  It is 

unacceptable if you simply read off from the English translation given in the 

course packet when called upon to translate in class.  

 

•  After we finish 2 or 3 stories we will devote one class period to oral reports.  

1. 5 or 6 students will be assigned to give reports on the stories we have just 

finished.  Each presenter will prepare a polished written draft of the report 

and make enough copies for everyone in class.   

2. The presentation should be no more than 10 minutes.  Do not read from 

your notes; try to speak naturally about the subject.  

3. Everyone in the audience has to prepare two “intelligent” questions about 

the story, and be prepared to ask them in Chinese in the discussion session 

following the reports.  

 

•  There will be three equally weighted tests.  Each test will include at least two parts: 

translation and essay questions.  Essay questions have to be answered in Chinese.  

The answer can be just a short paragraph, consisting of a few sentences.  You may 

write in either the traditional or the simplified form.  A good way of preparing for 

the essay questions is to get into the habit of jotting down your thoughts on the 

stories in Chinese throughout the semester.  You may also consult the 

recommended reading, A History of Modern Chinese Fiction, which will be on 

reserve at PCL, for historical background and ideas about the stories’ themes.  

 

• Since this is the most advanced Chinese class offered in our program, we tend to 

have students with very different backgrounds.  If you feel that your proficiency is 

not as good as some of your classmates, do not be overly concerned.  Progress 

you make during the semester will be taken into serious consideration in grading.  

What I care most is how much you learn from this class, so you will be essentially 

competing with yourself.  

 

III. Grading Policies 

 

Grades will be based on: 

(a)  Class preparation and participation (45%)  

(b)  Three equally weighted tests (45%) 

(c)   One oral report (10%) 

 

Plus/minus grades will be assigned for the final grade.  Absences exceeding the allowed 

quota may result in automatic dropping of the final grade by one or more levels.  

 

IV. Course Materials  

 

(a)  Xeroxed course packet (available at Paradigm Copy Shop; 407 W. 24th St., Tel. 472-7986) 

(b)  Lu Xun xiao shuo ji, vocabulary: selected short stories of Lu Xun (available at the  

       University Co-op) 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**Documented Disability Statement 

Students with disabilities may request appropriate academic accommodations from the 

Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities, 

471-6259. 

 

Schedule  

 

Aug. 27  Introduction  

Sept. 1   Video screening of China in Revolution  

 3   ?? Lu Xun. ??????    Preface to Call to Arms   

 8   ?? Lu Xun. ??????    Preface to Call to Arms   

    10   ?? Lu Xun   ????    Madman’s Diary     

    15   ?? Lu Xun   ????    Madman’s Diary     

      17   ?? Lu Xun   ????  Medicine  

    22   ?? Lu Xun   ????  Medicine  

    24   ?? Lu Xun   ??????   New Year Sacrifice   

     29   ?? Lu Xun   ??????   New Year Sacrifice   

  Oct.  1    Reports  

   6    First Test 

       8   ???   Shen Congwen    ??   Hisao-hsiao   

    13   ???   Shen Congwen    ??   Hisao-hsiao   

 15   ??? Shen Congwen    ??   Hisao-hsiao   

    20   ?? Mao Dun     ??  Spring Silkworms   

    22   ?? Mao Dun     ??  Spring Silkworms 

    27   ?? Mao Dun     ??  Spring Silkworms   

 29    Reports   

  Nov. 3   Second Test 

       5  ??  Zhao Shuli     ?  Goats   

    10   ??  Zhao Shuli     ?  Goats  

    12   ??  Zhao Shuli     ?  Goats   

    17   ??? Zhang Ailing    ???????? Shame, Amah!   

    19   ??? Zhang Ailing    ???????? Shame, Amah!   

    24   ??? Zhang Ailing    ???????? Shame, Amah!   

         26   Thanksgiving 

 

Dec.   1   Reports 

       Course Instructor Survey       

           3   Third Test       

 

 

 

ANS 384 • Cul Formations In Mod Taiwan

31572 • Fall 2009
Meets M 500pm-800pm MEZ 1.104
show description

Cultural Formations in Modern Taiwan 

CHI 384 

 31572 

 Fall 2009 

Class Times: M 5:00 – 8:00         Location: MEZ 1.104 

 

Instructor: Sung-sheng Yvonne Chang, Professor 

Office: WCH 4.124    E-mail: yvonne@mail.utexas.edu 

                                       Office Hours: TTh 12:30 -1:00; T 3:30 - 5:30  

 

I. Course Description  

 

The relationship between cultural formations in a modern society and the larger socio-historical 

environment is undoubtedly an important and extremely complex question.  Modern Taiwan’s unique 

geopolitical position and colonial history make it an excellent case for us to explore different 

dimensions of this question.   In the 1920s, entering the second, more stable phase of the Japanese 

colonial era (1895-1945), Taiwanese intellectuals launched their rugged journey of resistance through 

some distinctively cultural means.  Within a decade, however, urban modernity introduced by the 

colonizer began to facilitate the development of a rapidly maturing cultural field, which produced 

impressive literary and artistic works even in times of war and upheaval of the mid-20th-century.  

Then, under the prolonged martial law imposed by the Chinese Nationalist government (1949-1987), 

which retreated to Taiwan after losing the civil war to the Communists in 1949, as soon as harsh 

political repression gave way to subtler forms of cultural control, creative activities flourished, 

including a modernist movement the legacy of which is still vividly present in the internationally 

celebrated Taiwan New Cinema today.   Finally, in the post-martial-law period of the last two 

decades, intensification of the quasi-ethnic tension between the postwar settlers from China (the 

“Mainlanders”) and those who migrated to the island in earlier centuries (the “native Taiwanese”) has 

unexpectedly fostered a progressive ethos of cultural tolerance and pluralism, which richly informs 

the work of a younger generation of artists, most notably in the documentary films produced since the 

2000.  

 

The class will read Taiwanese fiction and poetry in the Chinese language (either as it was originally 

written or translated from the Japanese), watch films and digitized theatrical performances, and survey 

the small but fine scholarship of the newly institutionalized academic field of Taiwanese literary 

studies.  One of the main objectives is to develop new theoretical perspectives on cultural formations 

intricately caught in a complex network of forces of societal modernization, ethnic identification, and 

political authoritarianism.  

 

II. Course Requirements 

 

Each student is required to give two oral presentations and compile a critical bibliography on 

selected topics during the semester.  A research paper of 15 -20 pages in length will be due on 

Dec. 10, 2009.  

 

 

III. Grading Policies 

 

Grades will be based on: 

(a)  Two oral presentations (20%; 10 % each) 

(b)  Compilation of a bibliography on selected topic (10%)   

(c)  Class participation (20%) 

(c)  Research paper (50%) 

 

*Plus/minus grades will be assigned for the final grade.  

 

IV. Course Materials  

 

(a)  Materials placed on PCL Reserve and E-Reserve (password: Taiwan) 

(c)  Books available at the University Co-op (copies are also available on the PCL  

 Reserve):  

         Chang, Sung-sheng Yvonne, Modernism and the Nativist Resistance 

  Chang, Sung-sheng Yvonne, Literary Culture in Taiwan: Martial Law to Market Law  

          

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**Documented Disability Statement 

Any student with a documented disability who requires academic accommodations should 

contact Services for Students with Disabilities at 471-6259 (voice) or 1-866-329-3986 (Video 

Phone) as soon as possible to request an official letter outlining authorized accommodations. 

 

 

 

Schedule  

**This syllabus represents my current plans and objectives.  As we go through the 

semester, those plans may need to change to enhance the class learning opportunity.  In 

particular, I will add or subtract background readings in the assignments to meet the 

needs of the class.      

 

Week  1 

Aug.  31  Introduction   

   

Part I         Japanese Era and the Repatriation  

1920s to 1940s 

 

Week 2 Cultural resistance and anti-feudalist writings of the Japanese period 

Aug. 31 Introduction 

a. Tug of War: The Story of Taiwan (1998) (90 min) (you may view it in the 

Audio-Visual Library yourself, or together with ANS 372 on T, Sept. 1, 11- 

12:15 AM at BEN 1.124) 

b. ?? ,??????, ?????, ?????;?? ,?????; ??? ,????  

c. Chang, "Taiwanese New Literature and the Colonial Context: A Historical  

Survey"; Yee, Angelina, “Writing the Colonial Self: Yang Kui’s Texts of 

Resistance and National Identity.” 

Week 3 Colonial modernity, literary modernism, and a maturing cultural field 

Sept. 7  Labor Day  (we will meet on a different day of the week; TBA) 

  a.   ??? , ??? ,??????(2003) (104 min) 

b.   ?? , ??????, ????; ??? ,??????????;??? ,  

    ????; ??? ,????,????,???? 

  c.  Chang, “Beyond Cultural and National Identities: Current Re-evaluation  

   of the Kominka Literature from Taiwan's Japanese Period.”   

Week 4 Troubled identity; traumatic encounter with the “Fatherland”  

Sept. 14  a.  ??? ,??????(1989) (157 min) 

      b.  ???  ,????????,??????(Selected parts) 

 c.  Nishikawa Misturu (??? ) ,Eiren’s Fan—An Elegy on the February 28 Incident” 

 

PART II The Post-1949 Martial-Law Period 

1950s to 1980s 

 

Week  5 The mainstream cultural position, state-sponsored dominant culture, and  

  incipient Modernist trend 

21 a. ?? ,?????(1984);. ??? ,??????(1985); ?? , ????????? 

 (1985)  (95 min); ?? , ????(1993) 

  b.  ??? ,???,?????????; ?? ,???; ??? ,??????,?? 

      ?????? 

  c. Chang, Modernism and the Nativist Resistance, Ch. 1 & 2; Chang, Literary  

Culture in Taiwan, Ch. 6  

Week  6          Nativist criticism of modernization and neo-colonialism in the Third World 

28 a..  ????????? (1962); ??? , ?????1976? 

b. ??? ,???????,???,???????, ???, ???, ????? , 

???, ?????; ??? ,???????, ?????, ?? , ? , ??? 

c. Chang, Modernism, Ch. 5  

d. Presentation: Hong Kong cinema and the Taiwan market (Cindy Chan?)  

Week  7  Existentialist angst, idealistic nationalism, and “apolitical” aesthetics   

         Oct. 5 a. ??? ,?????? 

  b. ??? ,?????????,????; ??? ,????;????; ??? ,?? 

      ?? 

  c. Chang, Modernism, Ch. 5 & 6  

Week  8 Modernism reaching maturity; the Nativist debate 

           12 a. ??? ,????; ??? , ???? 

            b. Chang, Modernism, Ch. 4 & 5 

           

Late 1970s to late 1980s  

 

Week  9     Anticipating an open society; conjuring up a vision of “our past” 

          19    a. ??? , ?? , ??? , ????????; ??? ,??????(1986) (109 min) 

  (1983) 

  b. ?? ,???????; ??? ,?????; ?? ,???? 

Week  10        Babyboomers coming of age; second-generation mainlanders 

 26 a.  ??? ,???????????1985?,???????(1986) ; ?? ,???? 

  ??(1989) (116 min) 

        b.   ??? ,??????,?????; ??? ,????,??????? 

         c.  Chang,  “"Yuan Qiongqiong and the Rage for Eileen Zhang Among Taiwan's  

             Feminine Writers"   

Week 11   Crossroad on the eve of a new era: Art or Commerce? 

     Nov. 2    a. ??? ,??????(1986) (109 min) 

         b. ??? ,?????,????????; ??? ,???????; ??? ,??? 

  ??? 

c. Chang, “Chu T'ien-wen and Taiwan's Recent Cultural and  Literary Trends”; Chang, 

Literary Culture, Ch. 4 ; Chang, “The Terrorizer and the ‘Great Divide’ in Contemporary 

Taiwan’s Cultural Development.”   

   

PART III  The Contemporary (Post-martial law) Period 

Late 1980s to the present 

 

Week 12 Postmodern activism and mainstream artists  

          9 a. ??? ,??????(1994) (118 min) 

  b.?? ,???? 

  c. Presentation: The Little Theater (Dr. Peilin Liang) (with ANS 372: Nov. 10, T, 11- 

     12:15, BEN 1.124) 

Week 13  Entering a postmodern age?  Aestheticizing the urban middle-class life 

   16 a. ??? ,???? (2000) (173 min) 

  b. ??? ,??????  

Week 14 Disillusionment with the new democracy; search for the “local” and  

  reimagine the “other”    

 23 a. ??? ,??????(2002) (56 min); ??? ,???????(2000) (86 min) 

  b. ??? ,????; ?? ,?????????  

  c. Presentation;   Internet culture (Guo Shaohua) (ANS 372. Oct. 24, T, 11-12:15, BEN  

      1.124) 

Week  15 Self-positioning and globalization; membership in the New East Asian  

  Cultural Sphere?  

            30 a.??? ,??????(2004) (103  min) 

 b. Chiu Kuei-fen essay on documentary and the aboriginals; Chang, Hsiao-hung, “Pseudo- 

 Globalization” 

 

  Course Instructor Survey 

 

 

******************************* 

 

List of Films  

 

Week 2 Tug of War: The Story of Taiwan (Documentary; 1998) (90 min) 

Week 3 Viva Tonal – The Dance Age ?????? (Documentary; 2003) (104 min) 

Week 4  City of Sadness ??????(1989) (157 min) 

Week 5 Liang Shanbo yu Zhu Yingtai????????? (1962) (128 min); Jade Love ??? 

  ??(1984); ??????(1985); Kuei-mei, a Woman?????????(1985) 

 (95 min); Wedding Banquet ????(1993) (106  

  min) 

Week 6 Victory???? (Liu Jiachang, 1976)(95 min) 

Week   7 Cloudgate Dance Troupe ??????DVD 

Week  9        The Sandwich Man ????????(1983)(108 min); Dust in the Wind   ?????? 

  (1986) (109 min)  

Week 10         ???????????1985?; The Secret Love in Peach Blossom Land????? 

  ?? (Performance Workshop theater group, DVD;1986)(103 min); Banana Paradise?? 

  ????(1989) (116 min) 

Week 11  The Terrorizer  ?????? (1986) (109 min) 

Week 12        Vive L’Amour ?????? (1994) (118 min) 

Week   13 Yiyi  ???? (2000) (173 min) 

Week   14    How High Is the Mountain??????(Documentary; 2002) (56 min);  

  Sounds of Love and Sorrow???????(Documentary; 2000) (86 min) 

Week 15  Café Lumiere??????Café Lumiere (2004) (103  min) 

 

ANS 372 • Chinese Film And Literature

30525 • Spring 2009
Meets TTH 1100-1230pm MEZ 2.202
(also listed as C L 323 )
show description

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.  Some topics partially fulfill legislative requirement for American history.  Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

CHI 340 • Classical Chinese Poetry

30965 • Spring 2009
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm CAL 221
show description

Study of Chinese literary texts in the original.  Specific offerings listed in the Course Schedule.  Prerequisite: Chinese 320L with a grade of at least C.

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