Skip Navigation
UT wordmark
College of Liberal Arts wordmark
asianstudies masthead
Dr. Joel Brereton, Chair 120 INNER CAMPUS DR STOP G9300 WCH 4.134 78712-1251 • 512-471-5811

Madeline Y. Hsu

Associate Professor Ph.D., Yale University

Associate Professor; Director, Center for Asian American Studies
Madeline Y. Hsu

Contact

Biography

Courses Taught:

  • AAS 325/ HIS 350L: Chinese in Diaspora - W
  • AAS 325/ HIS 340S/ ANS 340S: Chinese in the U.S. - W
  • AAS 325/ HIS 364G/ ANS 361: Taiwan: Colonization, Migration, Identity - W

Awards/Honors:

2002 Association for Asian American Studies History Book Award for Dreaming of Gold, Dreaming of Home: Transnationalism and Migration Between the United States and Southern China, 1882-1943 (Stanford University Press, 2000)

   RAISE Awareness Award, Asian/Asian American Faculty Staff Association, UT Austin, 2009.

   HNN Leading Young Historian, 2007

Interests

Asian American studies, migration, transnationalism, and ethnic studies

ANS 340T • Taiwan: Colniz/Migratn/Ident

32107 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm GAR 2.128
(also listed as AAS 325, HIS 340T )
show description

Contemporary Taiwan’s claims of an ethnic identity distinct from the Chinese mainland reference a history of multiple colonizations and migrations to and from the island.  This course will explore questions of ethnicity, empire, and modernization in East Asia from the sixteenth century to the present through encounters between aborigines, Han Chinese, Dutch, Portuguese, the imperial Qing, Fujianese, Japanese, mainlander KMT, and the United States on Taiwan.

 Texts/Readings:

Shih-Shan Henry Tsai, Maritime Taiwan: Historical Encounters with the East and the West (M.E. Sharpe, 2009)

Denny Roy, Taiwan: A Political History (Cornell University Press, 2003)

Vivian S. Louie, Compelled to Excel: Immigration, Education, and Opportunity among Chinese Americans (Stanford University Press, 2004)

Course Reader prepared by the instructor, available on Blackboard

 Grade Distribution:

 Map quiz:  5%

 Exam: 30% Short IDs and essay

 Class participation and attendance: 15%

 Writing assignments: 50% Three 5-6 page essays, with one rewrite required.

ANS 361 • Taiwan: Colniz/Migratn/Ident

31475 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 930am-1100am JES A303A
(also listed as AAS 325, HIS 364G )
show description

Contemporary Taiwan’s claims of an ethnic identity distinct from the Chinese mainland refer to a history of multiple colonizations and migrations both to and from the island.  This course will explore questions of ethnicity, empire, and modernization in east Asia from the 16th century to the present through encounters between aborigines, Han Chinese, Dutch, Portuguese, the imperial Qing, Japanese, mainlander KMT, and the United States on Taiwan.  

 

Texts

Shih-Shan Henry Tsai, Maritime Taiwan: Historical Encounters with the East and the West (M.E. Sharpe, 2009)

Denny Roy, Taiwan: A Political History (Cornell, 2003)

Course Reader prepared by the instructor, available on eReserves

 

Grading

Map Quiz (5%):  Geography of Taiwan, the Taiwan Strait, and the South China Sea. 

Class Participation (10%):  You are expected to attend each class and participate fully in class discussions by contributing questions and comments either in class or on blackboard.  Class discussions of lectures and assigned readings will be conducted at least once each week.  Reading assignments are to be completed by the first day of class each week.  

Blue Book Exam (25%):  Short IDs and essay.  

Writing assignments (42%):  Three 5-page essays 

Assignment #1 (17%): Of the three main groups to inhabit Taiwan before 1750--the aborigines, Dutch, and Chinese--discuss which one you think had the most legitimate claim to rule the island.  As you set out your argument, be clear about defining political legitimacy and select historical examples that support your position.  

Assignment #2 (20%):  In the library, locate a pro-Formosan and a pro-KMT account of the February 28th incident and compare.  How do these versions differ?  How do political goals shape what information is presented about the violence and how motives are interpreted?  For this assignment, you will be placed into peer review groups of 2-3 to assist in paper revisions.  Your grade will be based on the average for all papers submitted from your group.

Assignment #3 (17%)-- Many conceptions of identity are strongly linked to geographic place.  Taiwan and Taiwanese, however, are characterized by the comings and goings of many different peoples.  Even the aborigines originated from somewhere else.  Drawing upon our overview of Taiwanese history--which emphasizes the entangled histories of aborigines, Dutch, Fujianese settlers, American missionaries and technical experts, Japanese colonizers, and mainland Chinese--and their movements elsewhere, create an icon that captures what you consider to be key aspects of Taiwanese identity and explain its symbolism and historical significance.  

Your paper must present a clearly articulated argument, include a carefully chosen array of supporting evidence, conform to a standardized style manual, and include a title, precisely articulated statement of thesis, bibliography, and citations.   

Papers that are turned in late will be penalized with point deductions.  Papers turned in after the lecture begins will be considered late.  Each day 1 percentage point will be deducted--Saturday, Sunday, and holidays count as one day each.  No credit for the paper will be given if it is turned in after ten days.  

 

NOTE:  Slipping papers under the instructor's door does not guarantee they will be received on the same day.   

ANS 361 • Taiwan: Coloniz/Migratn/Ident

30965 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm GAR 1.126
(also listed as AAS 325, HIS 364G )
show description

HIS 364G/AAS 325/ANS 361 

Taiwan: Colonization, Migration, and Identity

Description:

Contemporary Taiwan’s claims of an ethnic identity distinct from the Chinese mainland refer to a history of multiple colonizations and migrations both to and from the island.  This course will explore questions of ethnicity, empire, and modernization in east Asia from the 16th century to the present through encounters between aborigines, Han Chinese, Dutch, Portuguese, the imperial Qing, Japanese, mainlander KMT, and the United States on Taiwan. 

Texts/Readings:

Leslie Chang, Beyond the Narrow Gate: The Journey of Four Chinese Women from the Middle Kingdom to Middle America (Plume, 1999)
Hill Gates, Chinese Working-class Lives: Getting by in Taiwan (Cornell, 1987)
Denny Roy, Taiwan: A Political History (Cornell, 2003)
Course Reader prepared by the instructor, available on eReserves

Grade Distribution:

    Map quiz:  5 %
    Exam: 25% Short IDs and essay
    Class participation and attendance: 20 %
    Writing assignments:  50 % 3 5-6 page writing assignments; 1 to be rewritten

Description of course requirements:

Map Quiz (5%):  Geography of Taiwan, the Taiwan Strait, and the South China Sea. Jan. 23.
Class Participation (20%):  You are expected to attend each class and participate fully in class discussions by contributing questions and comments either in class or on blackboard.  Class discussions of lectures and assigned readings will be conducted at least once each week.  Reading assignments are to be completed by the first day of class each week. 


Exam (25%):  Bluebook exam with short IDs and essay.  Scheduled for Feb. 13 and 15.
Writing Assignments (50%):  3 5-6 page essays each worth 14% of your grade due Feb. 25 (revision due March 7), April 4, May 2.  The revision of your first paper is worth 8%.


Assignment #1: Of the three main groups to inhabit Taiwan before 1750--the aborigines, Dutch, and Chinese--discuss which one you think had the most legitimate claim to rule the island.  As you set out your argument, be clear about defining political legitimacy and select historical examples that support your position.  Revision due March 7.


Assignment #2:  In the library, locate a pro-Formosan account of the February 28th incident.  Compare this to the KMT version assigned in class.  How do these versions differ?  How do political goals inform each account?
May 2-- Many conceptions of identity are strongly linked to geographic place.  Taiwan and Taiwanese, however, are characterized by the comings and goings of many different peoples.  Even the aborigines originated from somewhere else.  Drawing upon our overview of Taiwanese history--which emphasizes the entangled histories of aborigines, Dutch, Fujianese settlers, American missionaries and technical experts, Japanese colonizers, and mainland Chinese--and their movements elsewhere, create an icon that captures what you consider to be key aspects of Taiwanese identity and explain its symbolism and historical significance. 
 
Your paper must present a clearly articulated argument, include a carefully chosen array of supporting evidence, conform to a standardized style manual, and include a title, precisely articulated statement of thesis, bibliography, and citations.  

Papers that are turned in late will be penalized with point deductions.  Papers turned in after the lecture begins will be considered late.  Each day 1 percentage point will be deducted--Saturday, Sunday, and holidays count as one day each.  No credit for the paper will be given if it is turned in after ten days.  NOTE:  Slipping papers under the instructor's door does not guarantee they will be received on the same day.  
ACADEMIC HONESTY: Academic honesty is very important. You are expected to complete your own work. If you have any questions about academic guidelines you may call my office, 232-9469, or email me at ANY time. You should follow University guidelines regarding plagiarism and student conduct.  For further information see: http://uwc.fac.utexas.edu/~virgil/essay/research/plagiarism.html

IMPORTANT NOTES:
1.        Respect the classroom environment. Turn off all cell-phones, beepers, and electronic games.  Do not read the newspaper, text message, or surf the web in class.
2.        Any handouts that you receive from the instructor or teaching assistants should be treated as required reading.
3.        My office is on the 3rd floor of Garrison. It is accessible by elevator. If, for some reason, my office is inaccessible to you, I will make arrangements to meet in a different location.
4.        The University of Texas provides, upon request, academic accommodations for students with disabilities. For more information contact the Office of the Dean of Students, 471-6259 or 471-4641.
5.        I will follow University standards and rules regarding academic dishonesty. You should familiarize yourself with these standards and consequences of violations university policy.
6.        Turning in assignments: I do not accept papers handed in by email.  Your papers are due at the beginning of class, in class.  Late papers may be handed in at the HIS office (GAR ) during regular office hours. 

Lecture and Reading Assignment Schedule (Subject to Change)

Week 1: Is Taiwan Chinese?
Jan. 14: Introduction
Jan. 18: Discussion of concepts of ethnicity and Taiwan aborigines

*Brown 1-34, Thompson “The Earliest Chinese Eyewitness Accounts of the Formosan Aborigines” in Monumenta Serica (1964): 163-204; Michael Stainton, “The Politics of Taiwan Aboriginal Origins” in Murray Rubenstein, Taiwan: A New History (M.E. Sharpe 1999): 27-44

Week 2: Ilha Formosa 
Jan. 21 MLK day--no class
Jan. 23 Map quiz

*Roy ix-75; Andrade “Chinese Under European Rule: The Case of Sino-Dutch Mediator He Bin” in Late Imperial China 28: 1 (June 2007): 1-32

Week 3: Island Frontier
Jan. 30: Discussion of maritime Europe and China
Feb. 1 Class cancelled

*Roy 76-151; excerpts from Emma Teng, Taiwan's Imagined Geography : Chinese Colonial Travel Writing and Pictures, 1683-1895 (Harvard University Asia Center, 2007) 81-100, 281-284; excerpts from Robert Berkhofer, The White Man’s Indian (Vintage, 1978): 115-134

Week 4: Qing Imperialism

*Roy 152-246; excerpts from Teng 101-148

Week 5: Examination
Feb. 13 and 15  Bluebook exam

*No readings

Week 6:  Japanese Imperialism

*Edward Chen, “Formosan Political Movements Under Japanese Colonial Rule, 1914-1937” Journal of Asian Studies 31:3 (May 1972): 477-497; Wu Zhuoliu, Memories of a Chinese Patriot (1stBooks Library, 2002): 1-145

Week 7:  World War II and the February 28th Incident 
Feb. 27 Documentary “The History of Taiwan: Postwar Era and the 228 Incident, 1945-49”

*Excerpts from Lai Tse-han, Ramon Myers, Wei Wou, A Tragic Beginning: The Taiwan Uprising of February 28, 1947 (Stanford University Press, 1991), 1-12, 99-193

Week 8:  Engendering China for America
March 5:  “Mme. Chiang Kai-shek: A Legendary Life” Part I

*Gates 5-67; excerpts from Karen Leong, The China Mystique: Pearl S. Buck, Anna May Wong, Mayling Soong, and the Transformation of American Orientalism (UC Press 2005): 106-154.

SPRING BREAK: MARCH 8-16

Week 9: Taiwan under the KMT
March 17:  “Mme. Chiang Kai-shek: A Legendary Life” Part II

*Gates 68-144; excerpt from Ezra F. Vogel, The Four Little Dragons: The Spread of Industrialization in East Asia (Harvard, 1991), 13-41.

Week 10: Uptown Chinese

*Gates 145-241; Iris Chang Chinese in America (Penguin 2003): 283-311

Week 11: The Brain Drain and Liuxuesheng Consciousness

*Chang 1-71; Chen Hsiang-shui, Chinatown No More: Taiwan Immigrants in Contemporary New York (Cornell 1992): 51-143; Charlotte Brooks, “Sing Sheng vs. Southwood: Residential Integration in Cold War California,” Pacific Historical Review 73 (August 2004): 463-89; excerpts by Chen Ruoxi in Nativism Overseas: Contemporary Chinese Women Writers edited by Hsin-sheng C. Kao (SUNY 1993): 9-51

Week 12: Taiwanese American Community

*Chang 73-211; excerpts from Timothy Fong, The First Suburban Chinatown: The Remaking of Monterey Park, California (Temple University Press, 1994): 15-54

Week 13: Taiwan’s Independence Movement
April 18 “HHH”

*Chang 213-288; Sibyl Chen, Our Treasury (ITASCA 2002)

Week 14:  Contemporary Taiwanese Identities
April 21: Discussion of “HHH”

* Bonnie Adrian, excerpt from Framing the Bride: Globalizing Beauty and Romance in Taiwan’s Bridal Industry (UC Press, 2003): 76-107; Pei-Chia Lan “Legal Servitude and Free Illegality: Migrant ‘Guest’ Workers in Taiwan” in Siu and Parrenas Asian Diasporas (2007); Scott Simon, excerpt from Sour and Sweet: Life-Worlds of Taipei Women Entrepreneurs (Rowman and Littlefield 2003): 1-26

Week 15: Taiwanese Transnationalism

*Shenglin Chang, “Transcultural Home Identity Across the Pacific: A Case Study of High-Tech Taiwanese Transnational Communities in Hsinchu, Taiwan, and Silicon Valley, USA” in Urban Ethnic Encounters : The Spatial Consequences, edited by Aygen Erdentug and Freek Colombijn (Routledge 2002): 142-159; Pei-te Lien, “Ethnic Homeland and Chinese Americans: Conceiving a Transnational Political Network” in Chinese Transnational Networks edited by Tan Chee-beng (Routledge, 2007): 107-121; Carolyn Chen, “The Religious Varieties of Ethnic Presence: A Comparison between a Taiwanese Immigrant Buddhist Temple and an Evangelical Christian Church” in Sociology of Religion 63:2 (Summer 2002): 215-238

 

ANS 361 • Chinese In Diaspora-W

31095 • Fall 2009
Meets M 300pm-600pm GAR 0.132
(also listed as AAS 325, HIS 350L )
show description

HIS350L/AAS325/ANS361                Instructor: Madeline Hsu                        Monday 3-6

Chinese in Diaspora

Course Schedule: (subject to change)
Week 2: Course Introduction and Main Themes: Migration and Race
Aug. 31 Come prepared to discuss your family's history of migration and answer the
question: When and how did your family become American?

Week 4: Conceptualizing Ethnicity and Migration: Chinese in Diaspora
Sept. 14 Read: Wang, Chinese Overseas

Week 5:  Chinese Preparation for Migration
Sept. 21 Read Kuhn, Chinese Among Others 1-152

Week 6:  Migration before and during the Age of Imperialism
Sept. 28 Read Kuhn, Chinese Among Others 153-282

Week 7: Migration in a Postcolonial World
Oct. 5 Read Kuhn, Chinese Among Others 283-385; Li Minghuan, "To Get Rich Quickly in
Europe!"--Reflections on Migration Motivation in Wenzhou. In Pieke and Malle, ed.,
Internal and International Migration: Chinese Perspectives (Curzon 1999).

Week 8: Food and Culture: Commonalities and Differences
Oct. 12 Read Roberts, China to Chinatown 9-131
*First book review due

Week 9: Food and Culture: Are We What We Eat?
Oct. 19 Read Roberts, China to Chinatown 135-228; Madeline Y. Hsu, "From Chop Suey to
Mandarin Cuisine: Fine Dining and the Refashioning of Chinese Ethnicity during the Cold
War Era" in Chan and Hsu, ed., Chinese Americans and the Politics of Race and Culture
(Temple University Press, 2008), 173-193.

Week 10:
Oct. 26 Read Lui, Chinatown Trunk Mystery 1-110

Week 11:
Nov. 2 Read Lui, Chinatown Trunk Mystery 111-226

Week 12: Questioning the Model Minority
Nov. 9 Read Louie, Compelled to Excel xiii-82; Keith Osajima, "Asian Americans as the
Model Minority: An Analysis of the Popular Press Image in the 1960s and 1980s" in Okihiro
et al ed., Reflections on Shattered Windows (Washington State University Press, 1988).
*Second book review due

Week 13: "Race" or Demography?
Nov. 16 Read Louie, Compelled to Excel 83-199

Week 14: Research Presentations
Nov. 23 In-class reports
*Research presentations

Week 15: Research presentations
Nov. 30 In-class reports
*Research presentations

*Dec. 11 Research papers due 5 pm at GRG 220

Some guidelines and suggestions:
Grading:  All final grades will be assigned on a plus/minus scale.
Writing Center: I strongly encourage you to use the Undergraduate Writing Center, FAC 211, 471-6222: http://uwc.utexas.edu/home). The Undergraduate Writing Center offers free, individualized, expert help with writing for any UT undergraduate, by appointment or on a drop-in basis. Any undergraduate enrolled in a course at UT can visit the UWC for assistance with any writing project. They work with students from every department on campus, for both academic and non-academic writing. Whether you are writing a lab report, a resume, a term paper, a statement for an application, or your own poetry, UWC consultants will be happy to work with you. Their services are not just for writing with 'problems.' Getting feedback from an informed audience is a normal part of a successful writing project. Consultants help students develop strategies to improve their writing. The assistance they provide is intended to foster independence. Each student determines how to use the consultant?s advice. The consultants are trained to help you work on your writing in ways that preserve the integrity of your work. Academic Honesty: Academic honesty is critical to your education. You are expected to complete your own work. If you have any questions about academic guidelines you may call my office, 232-9469, or email me at ANY time. You should follow University guidelines regarding plagiarism and student conduct.  For further information see: http://projects.uwc.utexas.edu/virgil/?q=node/206 OR http://www.utexas.edu/cola/depts/history/about/academic-integrity.php

Important Notes:
1.        Respect the classroom environment. Turn off all cell-phones, beepers, and
electronic games.  Do not read the newspaper, text message, or surf the web in class.
2.        Any handouts that you receive from the instructor or teaching assistants should
be treated as required reading.
3.        My office is on the 3rd floor of Garrison. It is accessible by elevator. If,
for some reason my office is inaccessible to you, I will make arrangements to meet in a
different location.
4.        The University of Texas provides, upon request, academic accommodations for
students with disabilities. For more information contact the Office of the Dean of
Students, 471-6259 or 471-4641.
5.        I will follow University standards and rules regarding academic dishonesty. You
should familiarize yourself with these standards and consequences of violations
university policy.
6.        Turning in assignments: I do not accept papers handed in by email.  Your papers
are due at the beginning of class, in class.  Late papers may be handed in at the CAAS
office (GRG 220) during regular office hours.

Publications

Hsu, M. (2009) Domesticating the Yellow Peril: Students and Changing Perceptions of the Indigestibility of Chinese Immigrants, 1905-1950. In V. Kuneman & R. Mayer (Eds.), Transpacific Interactions: The United States and China, 1880-1950. New York: Palgrave Macmillan Press.

Hsu, M. (2008) Chinese Americans and the Politics of Race and Culture.   Temple University Press.

 

Hsu Bookcover

Hsu, M. (2008, August) Chinese Transnational Networks. Pacific Affairs 81(2).

   Dreaming of Gold, Dreaming of Home: Transnationalism and Migration Between the United States and South China, 1882-1943.  Stanford University Press, 2000.  Association for Asian American Studies History Book Award, 2002.             

  Co-edited with Sucheng Chan.  Chinese Americans and the Politics of Race and Culture.  Temple University Press, 2008.

bottom border