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Jason Abrevaya, Chair 2225 Speedway, Stop C3100, Austin, TX 78712 • Admin: 512-471-3211 & Advising: 512-471-2973

Michael Sadler

Senior Lecturer Ph.D.

Contact

ECO 304L • Introduction To Macroeconomics

34405 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am SAC 1.402
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ANALYSIS OF THE ECONOMY AS A WHOLE (ITS ORGANIZATION AND THE BASIC FORCES INFLUENCING ITS GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT); MONEY AND BANKING, NATIONAL INCOME, PUBLIC FINANCE, AND INTERNATIONAL LINKAGES.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

DESIGNED TO ACCOMMODATE 100 OR MORE STUDENTS.

This course is designed to introduce students to the vocabulary, concepts and models of analysis of macroeconomics. We will discuss the behavior of the aggregate economy, particularly the Gross Domestic Product; Consumption; Savings; Investment,Unemployment; Inflation; the role of the Monetary System and and Policy, the role of Taxes, Government Spending and Fiscal Policy; the National Debt and Government Budget Deficits and Surpluses; Exports, Imports and International Trade.

 

ECO 334K • Urban Economics

34795 • Spring 2014
Meets MW 200pm-330pm UTC 4.112
(also listed as URB 351 )
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ECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF URBAN AREAS; EMPHASIS ON THE NATURE OF CURRENT URBAN PROBLEMS--SLUMS, TRANSPORTATION, FINANCE--AND AN EVALUATION OF CURRENT POLICY.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

SAME AS URB 351 (TOPIC 2).

This course is focused o the internal workings of cities and the role of cities in the larger economy.  Using micro economic theory, the class will be examining questions like: Why do so many students live in the Riverside area, 4 miles from campus? Why do high income individuals live in central Paris, but low income individuals live in central Detroit? Is Segregation 'good' or 'bad'? What affect has the automobile and public transportation had on our urban economy? Why might developed economy systems of cities look different than those of less developed economies?

ECO 350K • Energy Economics

34825 • Spring 2014
Meets MW 1100am-1230pm UTC 3.122
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This course will focus on energy and environmental policy, assessments of current and emerging global energy and environmental issues, and environmental policy options for dealing with these issues at global, national, and local scales.

 

Prerequisites: ECO 420K with a C- or better

ECO 334K • Urban Economics

34361 • Spring 2013
Meets MW 200pm-330pm UTC 4.112
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ECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF URBAN AREAS; EMPHASIS ON THE NATURE OF CURRENT URBAN PROBLEMS--SLUMS, TRANSPORTATION, FINANCE--AND AN EVALUATION OF CURRENT POLICY.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

SAME AS URB 351 (TOPIC 2).

This course is focused o the internal workings of cities and the role of cities in the larger economy.  Using micro economic theory, the class will be examining questions like: Why do so many students live in the Riverside area, 4 miles from campus? Why do high income individuals live in central Paris, but low income individuals live in central Detroit? Is Segregation 'good' or 'bad'? What affect has the automobile and public transportation had on our urban economy? Why might developed economy systems of cities look different than those of less developed economies?

ECO 322 • Money And Banking

34225 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm BUR 216
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THE ROLE OF MONEY AND DEPOSITORY INSTITUTIONS IN THE ECONOMY; INTRODUCTION TO FINANCIAL AND MONETARY THEORY AND POLICY. ONLY ONE OF THE FOLLOWING MAY BE COUNTED: ECONOMICS 322, FINANCE 354, 354H.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K AND 320L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

This course is about economic wealth: its various forms (called assets), the institutions that create, own, and exchange wealth, the government policies that regulate the behavior of these institutions, and the social origins and consequences of these assets, institutions, and policies. Financial assets-including but not limited to money-exist as stores of value, linking the production of goods in the present to the production and consumption of goods in the future. The focus of this course is on the challenge wealth presents to society: the need to ensure thta the public can assess with reasonable accuracy the various rates of return on financial assets. So long as financial assets, on average, meet people's expectations, people will seek to acquire and be willing to hold them. The resulting demand for financial assets is simultaneously a reflection of the public's confidence in them and a principal determinant of their rates of return. The origins and evolution of assets, institutions, and policies may be understood as an endless search for socially effective and privately profitable means of managing the risky task of betting on the future.

ECO 322 • Money And Banking

34252 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm UTC 3.102
show description

THE ROLE OF MONEY AND DEPOSITORY INSTITUTIONS IN THE ECONOMY; INTRODUCTION TO FINANCIAL AND MONETARY THEORY AND POLICY. ONLY ONE OF THE FOLLOWING MAY BE COUNTED: ECONOMICS 322, FINANCE 354, 354H.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K AND 320L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

This course is about economic wealth: its various forms (called assets), the institutions that create, own, and exchange wealth, the government policies that regulate the behavior of these institutions, and the social origins and consequences of these assets, institutions, and policies. Financial assets-including but not limited to money-exist as stores of value, linking the production of goods in the present to the production and consumption of goods in the future. The focus of this course is on the challenge wealth presents to society: the need to ensure thta the public can assess with reasonable accuracy the various rates of return on financial assets. So long as financial assets, on average, meet people's expectations, people will seek to acquire and be willing to hold them. The resulting demand for financial assets is simultaneously a reflection of the public's confidence in them and a principal determinant of their rates of return. The origins and evolution of assets, institutions, and policies may be understood as an endless search for socially effective and privately profitable means of managing the risky task of betting on the future.

ECO 322 • Money And Banking

33420 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 800am-930am WAG 201
show description

THE ROLE OF MONEY AND DEPOSITORY INSTITUTIONS IN THE ECONOMY; INTRODUCTION TO FINANCIAL AND MONETARY THEORY AND POLICY. ONLY ONE OF THE FOLLOWING MAY BE COUNTED: ECONOMICS 322, FINANCE 354, 354H.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K AND 320L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

This course is about economic wealth: its various forms (called assets), the institutions that create, own, and exchange wealth, the government policies that regulate the behavior of these institutions, and the social origins and consequences of these assets, institutions, and policies. Financial assets-including but not limited to money-exist as stores of value, linking the production of goods in the present to the production and consumption of goods in the future. The focus of this course is on the challenge wealth presents to society: the need to ensure thta the public can assess with reasonable accuracy the various rates of return on financial assets. So long as financial assets, on average, meet people's expectations, people will seek to acquire and be willing to hold them. The resulting demand for financial assets is simultaneously a reflection of the public's confidence in them and a principal determinant of their rates of return. The origins and evolution of assets, institutions, and policies may be understood as an endless search for socially effective and privately profitable means of managing the risky task of betting on the future.

ECO 304L • Introduction To Macroeconomics

33525 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 1100-1200 UTC 3.132
show description

ANALYSIS OF THE ECONOMY AS A WHOLE (ITS ORGANIZATION AND THE BASIC FORCES INFLUENCING ITS GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT); MONEY AND BANKING, NATIONAL INCOME, PUBLIC FINANCE, AND INTERNATIONAL LINKAGES.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

DESIGNED TO ACCOMMODATE 100 OR MORE STUDENTS.

This course is designed to introduce students to the vocabulary, concepts and models of analysis of macroeconomics. We will discuss the behavior of the aggregate economy, particularly the Gross Domestic Product; Consumption; Savings; Investment,Unemployment; Inflation; the role of the Monetary System and and Policy, the role of Taxes, Government Spending and Fiscal Policy; the National Debt and Government Budget Deficits and Surpluses; Exports, Imports and International Trade.

 

ECO 304L • Introduction To Macroeconomics

33530 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm WEL 1.316
show description

ANALYSIS OF THE ECONOMY AS A WHOLE (ITS ORGANIZATION AND THE BASIC FORCES INFLUENCING ITS GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT); MONEY AND BANKING, NATIONAL INCOME, PUBLIC FINANCE, AND INTERNATIONAL LINKAGES.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

DESIGNED TO ACCOMMODATE 100 OR MORE STUDENTS.

This course is designed to introduce students to the vocabulary, concepts and models of analysis of macroeconomics. We will discuss the behavior of the aggregate economy, particularly the Gross Domestic Product; Consumption; Savings; Investment,Unemployment; Inflation; the role of the Monetary System and and Policy, the role of Taxes, Government Spending and Fiscal Policy; the National Debt and Government Budget Deficits and Surpluses; Exports, Imports and International Trade.

 

ECO 304L • Introduction To Macroeconomics

33670 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm UTC 2.102A
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ECONOMICS 304L: Introduction to Macroeconomics

Fall 2009

Unique No. 33670

UTC 2.210A

Michael A. Sadler

Office: BRB 2.102B

(512) 475 - 8517

msadler@austin.utexas.edu

website: TBD

Office hours: Tuesday, 10:30 – 12:00, Wednesday 9:30 – 11:00

Objectives: This class will provide you with an introduction to concepts and models of

macroeconomics. By the end of the semester, you will understand the operation and effects of monetary

and fiscal policy, theories on why some economies grow faster than others, how the international

economy operates, and many other things. We will also discuss recent macroeconomic phenomena,

such as the effects of the financial crisis, and the role of fiscal and monetary policy in dealing with the

crisis.

Teaching Assistants: We have two teaching assistants, whose names, contact information and office

hours are given below. You are encouraged to contact the TAs when you need help with the course

material, have questions about an exam or quiz, or any other matter related to the course. The TAs will

also be holding optional review sessions prior to each exam.

Sarah Popkin. Office: BRB 4.118. Office hours: Monday 3:00 – 5:00, Thursday 11:00 – 12:00.

Email: sarahpopkin@mail.utexas.edu.

Russell Gerber. Office: BRB 4.120. Office hours: Tuesdays and Thursdays 2:00 – 3:30. email:

russell.gerber@gmail.com .

Textbook: The textbook is N. Gregory Mankiw, Principles of Macroeconomics, 5th edition published

by South-Western. There is also a study guide that you can purchase. It is authored by David R.

Hakes. If you cannot find it in the bookstores, you can order a copy yourself from the bookstores or

online. There is also a website for the book that I encourage you to explore:

(www.cengage.com/economics/mankiw).

Grades: Your grade in the course will be based on three midterm exams, periodic quizzes, and a

comprehensive final exam. The final exam is optional, and will replace the lowest midterm exam score

earned during the semester if you choose to take it. All exams are equally weighted.

Exams (best 3 of 4) 300 points (100 each exam)

Quizzes (best 4 of 5) 100 points (25 each quiz)

The grading scale will be A: 360+, B: 320 – 359, C: 280 – 319, D: 240 – 279.

There is no "extra credit" possible in this class and grades will not be "curved".

Final Exam: The semester does not officially end for any student until the completion of the final

exam period. This means that you should never make plans to leave prior to the end of finals. Please

do not ask me to take the final earlier or later than that date unless you have a conflict that meets the

requirements of the University for setting an alternative final exam date.

Midterm Exams and Quizzes: Unless you have an official university excuse (e.g., athletics), then there

is no such thing as a make-up exam or quiz in this class. Remember that you can drop one quiz score,

and your final score can replace your lowest exam score (even if it is zero). This effectively eliminates

the need for make-ups. If you do have an official university excuse, then you must notify me at least

one week in advance to arrange to take the exam prior to your departure.

Homework: Several times during the semester, I will post homework problems for you to complete, but

they will not be handed in or graded. These problems are intended to assist you in understanding the

material that we discuss in class as well as to prepare you for upcoming quizzes and exams. Note: it is

not possible to perform well in this class without paying careful attention to the homework problems.

Within a week after the homework is posted, I will post solutions for you to check your work.

However, I encourage you to attempt the homework problems on your own instead of waiting for my

solutions.

Appeals: There is a statute of limitations on appeals of exam and quiz scores. For example, if you feel

that your answer could have been correct, also, yet you were not given credit, then you have one week

from the date that exams were handed back in order to bring this to the attention of one of the TAs or

me.

Class behavior: Here are a few very simple rules for lectures:

(1) Please pick up after yourself when you leave

(2) Please do not read the newspaper or other material in class

(3) There must be a better place to sleep than here, so please stay awake

(4) Please try to answer questions posed during lectures

(5) Turn your cell phone off and do not send text messages during class

(5) Always laugh at my jokes, whether you understand them or not

The following schedule is best viewed as an approximation. We will not begin and end each topic

precisely as shown here. For this reason, it is best to attend class regularly to find out what is being

covered. Dates for quizzes and exams are firm, regardless of the pace of the class. I will inform you in

class of the material that will be covered in upcoming exams and quizzes.

 

Week Beginning

Topic

Chapters in Mankiw

Special Dates

8/26

Intro and Review

2, 4

 

8/31

National Income Accounting

10

 

9/9

Measuring the Cost of Living

11

Quiz 1, Friday 9/11

9/14

Growth and Productivity

12

 

9/21

Employment and Unemployment

15

Exam 1, Friday 9/25

9/28

Saving Investment and the Financial System

13

 

10/5

Introduction to Financial Economics

14

Quiz 2, Friday 10/9

10/12

The Monetary System

16

 

10/19

Money Supply Growth and Inflation

17

Quiz 3, 10/23

10/26

Intro to Open Economy Macro

18

Exam 2, Friday 10/30

11/2

Intro to Aggregate Supply & Demand

20

 

11/9

Monetary and Fiscal Policy

21

Quiz 4, Thursday 11/13

11/16

The Phillips Curve

22

 

11/23

See note below

 

Exam 3, Monday 11/23

11/30

A Macroeconomic Model of the Open Economy

 

Quiz 5, Wednesday 12/2

Note: there will be no class the Wednesday prior to Thanksgiving, November 25.

ECO 320L • Macroeconomic Theory

33765 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 1200-100pm UTC 3.122
show description

ECONOMICS 320L: Macroeconomic Theory

Fall 2009

Unique No. 33765

UTC 3.122

Michael A. Sadler

Office: BRB 2.102B

(512) 475 - 8517

msadler@austin.utexas.edu

web page: TBD

Office hours: Tuesday, 10:30 – 12:00, Wednesday 9:30 – 11:00

Objectives: This class further develops the macroeconomic concepts and models that you first learned

in Principles of Macroeconomics, and adds some new dimensions to your study of Macroeconomics, as

well. We will explore fundamental macroeconomic concepts using traditional macroeconomic models.

This will involve analysis of the classical model of the long run as well as the Keynesian model of the

short run. We will also discuss monetary and fiscal policy and their roles in stabilizing the economy, as

well as theories of long-term economic growth, in addition to other relevant topics. Throughout the

semester, we will attempt to use examples from the recent economic downturn to make sense of the

models that we discuss.

Teaching Assistant: Florian Kuhn. Office: BRB 4.124. email: florian@mail.utexas.edu. Office

hours: Mondays, 3:15 - 4.45, Thursdays, 2:00 – 3:30.

Textbook: The textbook is N. Gregory Mankiw, Macroeconomics, 7th edition published by Worth.

Grades: Your grade in the course will be based on three midterm exams and a comprehensive final as

well as on homework that you will turn in. All four exam scores are equally weighted and your lowest

exam score will be dropped.

Exams (best 3 of 4) 300 points (100 each exam)

Homework (4) 100 points (25 each)

The grading scale will be A: 360+, B: 320 – 359, C: 280 – 319, D: 240 – 279.

There is no "extra credit" possible in this class and grades will not be "curved".

Final Exam: The semester does not officially end for any student until the completion of the final

exam period. This means that you should never make plans to leave prior to the end of finals. Please

do not ask me to take the final earlier or later than that date unless you have a conflict that meets the

requirements of the University for setting an alternative final exam date.

Midterm Exams: Unless you have an official university excuse (e.g., athletics), then there is no such

thing as a make-up exam in this class. The grading system allows you to replace your lowest midterm

exam score with your final exam score. This effectively eliminates the need for make-ups. If you do

have an official university excuse, then you must notify me at least one week in advance to arrange to

take the exam prior to your departure.

Homework: Five times during the semester, I will post homework problems for you to complete, and

four of these will be turned in by you and graded (Homework 1 will not be graded, see schedule on next

page). These problems are intended to assist you in understanding the material that we discuss in class

as well as to prepare you for upcoming exams. Note: it is not possible to perform well in this class

without paying careful attention to the homework problems, as problems on the exams will be based on

these. Shortly after the homework is posted, or after you turn it in to be graded, I will post solutions for

you to check your work.

Appeals: There is a statute of limitations on appeals of exam scores. For example, if you feel that your

answer could have been correct, also, yet you were not given credit, then you have one week from the

date that exams were handed back in order to bring this to the attention of the TA or me.

The following schedule is best viewed as an approximation. We will not begin and end each topic

precisely as shown here. For this reason, it is best to attend class regularly to find out what is being

covered. Dates for exams are firm, regardless of the pace of the class. I will inform you in class of the

material that will be covered in upcoming exams.

Week beginning

 

Topic

Chapters in

Mankiw

 

Special dates

 

8/26

National Income Accounting,

Measuring the Cost of Living,

Employment and Unemployment

 

2

 

 

8/31

The Long Run: Classical

Macroeconomic Theory

 

3

 

 

9/9

Money, Prices and Inflation

4

 

9/14

Unemployment

6

Homework 2 due, Friday 9/18

9/21

The Open Economy

5

Exam 1, Friday 9/25

9/28

The Short run:  Keynesian Macroeconomic Theory

9

 

10/5

Aggregate Demand:  The IS-LM Model

10

 

10/12

Aggregate Demand:  Modeling Macro Policy Using the IS-LM Model

11

 

10/19

Aggregate Supply and the Phillips Curve

13

Homework 3 due, Friday 10/23

10/26

Consumption

16

Exam 2, Friday 10/30

11/2

Investment

17

 

11/9

Money Supply and Demand

18

 

11/16

Economic Growth I

7

Homework 4 due, Wednesday 11/18

11/23

See note below

 

Exam 3, Monday 11/23

11/30

Economic Growth II

8

Homework 5 due, Wednesday 12/2

Note: there will be no class the Wednesday prior to Thanksgiving, November 25.

ECO 322 • Money And Banking

33780 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 300pm-400pm UTC 3.122
show description

THE ROLE OF MONEY AND DEPOSITORY INSTITUTIONS IN THE ECONOMY; INTRODUCTION TO FINANCIAL AND MONETARY THEORY AND POLICY. ONLY ONE OF THE FOLLOWING MAY BE COUNTED: ECONOMICS 322, FINANCE 354, 354H.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K AND 320L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

This course is about economic wealth: its various forms (called assets), the institutions that create, own, and exchange wealth, the government policies that regulate the behavior of these institutions, and the social origins and consequences of these assets, institutions, and policies. Financial assets-including but not limited to money-exist as stores of value, linking the production of goods in the present to the production and consumption of goods in the future. The focus of this course is on the challenge wealth presents to society: the need to ensure thta the public can assess with reasonable accuracy the various rates of return on financial assets. So long as financial assets, on average, meet people's expectations, people will seek to acquire and be willing to hold them. The resulting demand for financial assets is simultaneously a reflection of the public's confidence in them and a principal determinant of their rates of return. The origins and evolution of assets, institutions, and policies may be understood as an endless search for socially effective and privately profitable means of managing the risky task of betting on the future.

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