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Martin Kevorkian, Chair CAL 226, Mailcode B5000, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-4991

Janine Barchas

Professor Ph.D., 1995, University of Chicago

Janine Barchas

Contact

Biography

Janine Barchas (Stanford B.A. and Chicago Ph.D.) joined the University of Texas at Austin in 2002, after teaching at the University of Auckland for five years.

Barchas’ first book, Graphic Design, Print Culture, and the Eighteenth-Century Novel (Cambridge UP, 2003), won the SHARP book prize for best work in the field of book history.  In addition to several editing projects, Barchas has published articles on writers from “the long eighteenth century” in journals such as ELH, Review of English Studies, Eighteenth-Century Life, Eighteenth-Century Fiction, Nineteenth-Century Literature, and Persuasions.  Her most recent book is Matters of Fact in Jane Austen: History, Location, and Celebrity (Johns Hopkins University Press, August 2012). 

Cover for Pride and Prejudice

Ongoing projects include an investigation into the marketing of Jane Austen by means of book covers—cataloguing two centuries of cover art that packaged Austen’s work from 1833 to the present.  Prof. Barchas recently published a sample from that research in an essay for the New York Times, "The 200-Year Jane Austen Book Club."

Her latest project is a website entitled “What Jane Saw.”  This website (www.whatjanesaw.org) offers a virtual reconstruction of a museum exhibit attended by Jane Austen in 1813.  “What Jane Saw” launched on 24 May 2013, 200 years to the day that the Austens attended.

If you would like to “see” Professor Barchas talk briefly about these projects, you can also find her in a series of short UT-sponsored “Knowledge Matters” videos on YouTube.  In these videos she explains celebrity culture in Austen’s time, shows samples of outrageous and influential book covers of Austen, and talks about the making of her new “What Jane Saw” website.

What Jane Saw Interactive Exhibit

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Please visit the What Jane Saw project page.

 

Interests

Eighteenth-century literature and culture; digital humanities; the British novel; book history; textual studies; Jane Austen; early fiction by women.

E 327 • British Novel In 18th Century

35720 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm PAR 206
show description

Instructor:  Barchas, J

Unique #:  35720

Semester:  Fall 2014

Cross-lists:  n/a

Flags: Global Cultures; Writing

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: The generic label “novel” did not come into general use until the 1780s. Yet long before then writers and readers acknowledged that a “new species of writing” was rapidly transforming the literary scene (even if they couldn’t agree on what to call it). “Novel” is ultimately an apt name for a genre that experimented broadly (and, broadly, every publication was an experiment during these formative years) with both narrative content and printed self-presentation. This class explores the emergence of the British novel over the course of “the long eighteenth century,” from 1688 to 1816. Although this class includes study of a pivotal work by Defoe and consideration of the famous Fielding and Richardson rivalry, it dedicates the bulk of its attention to important fictions by early women writers. It is not coincidental that the rise of the novel coincides with the rise of the professional woman writer (and a sharp increase in female literacy); the novel’s fate would be in large part determined by the female pen. Lectures will provide a historical and visual context for these texts’ overlapping preoccupations with issues as varied as art, colonialism, landscape, economics, theatre, urbanization, and print culture.

Texts: Aphra Behn, Oroonoko (Norton); Eliza Haywood, Love in Excess (Broadview Press); Daniel Defoe, Moll Flanders (Oxford Univ Press); Samuel Richardson, Pamela (OUP); Charlotte Lennox, Female Quixote (OUP or Norton); Frances Burney, Evelina (OUP); Jane Austen, Mansfield Park (Norton); Mary Shelley, Frankenstein (OUP). Original publication dates listed in the syllabus; we are reading these novels in temporal sequence.

Requirements & Grading: Four 4-page papers, 15% each; Final exam, 30%; Attendance/Participation/Quiz, 10%.

E S349S • Jane Austen-Gbr

83410 • Summer 2014
Meets
show description

Instructor:  Barchas, J

Unique #:  83410

Semester:  Summer 2014, second session

Cross-lists:  n/a

Flags:  n/a

Restrictions: Oxford Summer Program participants

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Six semester hours of upper-division coursework in English.

Description: While living at Wadham College in Oxford, this class reads four novels by Jane Austen in the context of the real-life locations that served as settings for her stories and her life. We will read Sense and Sensibility (1811). Pride and Prejudice (1813), Persuasion (1818), and Northanger Abbey (1818) and visit country estates and towns featured in these fictions. Like the heroine Elizabeth in Pride and Prejudice, we will tour rich country estates and extant eighteenth-century gardens, particularly those of Blenheim, West Wycombe, and Prior Park. We will explore the city of Bath, where Austen and her family lived for many years and which features in Northanger Abbey. We will also travel through the Hampshire countryside, where Austen lived much of her life, in order to visit the village of Chawton, where her former home is now a museum, and the Winchester Cathedral, where Austen lies buried. We will end the term with Persuasion, a novel that provides us with an alternative judgment of the city of Bath. With many Regency gardens and period architecture still extant in Oxford’s own environs, we will spend as much time as possible outdoors -- reconstructing both Austen’s real world and her imagined one.

Recommended Reading: (1 biography and the collected letters)

Park Honan, Jane Austen: Her Life (1989), or Claire Tomalin, Jane Austen: A Life (1999), or Jon Spence, Becoming Jane Austen (2007); and Deirdre Le Faye, editor, Jane Austen’s Letters (1997).

Requirements & Grading: 3 written research reports (25% each). Participation and oral report, including field trips (25%). No final exam. Grades will be based on an A-F system, using pluses & minuses.

E 349S • Jane Austen

35845 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm PAR 206
show description

Instructor:  Barchas, J            Areas:  I / H

Unique #:  35845            Flags:  n/a

Semester:  Fall 2013            Restrictions: n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Six semester hours of upper-division coursework in English.

Description: This interdisciplinary single-author course is devoted to the six major novels of Jane Austen.  The primary emphasis in this class will be on the study of Austen in her historical context.  The class will ask how Austen fits into the development of the modern novel genre as well as how her stories touch upon issues of gender, economics, art, and the politics of her time.  Central to this class will be a brand new website, hosted by LAITS, called “What Jane Saw.”  The “What Jane Saw” website reconstructs a museum exhibit that Austen attended in 1813.  This important museum exhibit showcased over 100 portraits of celebrities by Sir Joshua Reynolds.  Lectures will use this website as a focal point from which students will pursue questions about customs, politics, and celebrity culture during the Georgian era.  In addition to reconstructing the cultural context of Austen’s fictions, we will consider a few recent re-workings of the novels, including radical “adaptations” such as Clueless and The Lizzie Bennet Diaries, which recast Emma and Pride and Prejudice into a modern mold.  By way of these slightly irreverent modernizations, we will find ourselves asking why a novelist who was for quite some time considered a parochial 18th-century throwback has won so much acclaim at the turn of the 21st century.

Texts: Jane Austen: Sense and Sensibility (1811); Pride and Prejudice (1813); Mansfield Park (1814); Emma (1815); Northanger Abbey (1817); Persuasion (1817).

Requirements & Grading: Three written reports that offer contextual histories for Austen’s novels (15% each = 45%); Final exam (30%); Quizzes (10%); Group presentation (15%).

E 392M • Jane Austen

36155 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 930am-1100am CAL 221
show description

Why invest in a graduate seminar dedicated to Jane Austen?  First, there are unique professional benefits to the mastery of a single author whose corpus is of a manageable size.   Such a focused study generates the type of deep expertise that makes for good dissertations (regardless of whether that dissertation is on an entirely different author in an completely different century).  Moreover, Austen’s popularity with undergrads now rivals Shakespeare and thus the market for teachers might reward those with classroom-ready knowledge of this particular major author.  Why take such a course with Barchas?  Well, she has just published a major book on Austen with Johns Hopkins UP (see reviews in LARB, TLS, Choice, and RES) and would like to pass on all the off-page learnings from that project before her knowledge “grows stale.”

The class will study all the surviving works of Jane Austen (6 published novels, juvenilia, and letters) in their historical context.  The research emphasis will be on her 18th-century influences as well as Regency culture.  Everyone will also read one major biography and one major critical book on Austen.  Discussion will roam the three arenas in which Austen currently appears: 1) classroom, 2) academic research, and 3) pop culture.

E 327 • English Novel In 18th Century

35390 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 800am-930am PAR 204
show description

Instructor:  Barchas, J            Areas:  III / E

Unique #:  35390            Flags: Global cultures; Writing

Semester:  Spring 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: The generic label “novel” did not come into general use until the 1780s. Yet long before then writers and readers acknowledged that a “new species of writing” was rapidly transforming the literary scene (even if they couldn’t agree on what to call it). “Novel” is ultimately an apt name for a genre that experimented broadly (and, broadly, every publication was an experiment during these formative years) with both narrative content and printed self-presentation. This class explores the emergence of the British novel over the course of “the long eighteenth century,” from 1688 to 1816. Although this class includes study of a pivotal work by Defoe and consideration of the famous Fielding and Richardson rivalry, it dedicates the bulk of its attention to important fictions by early women writers. It is not coincidental that the rise of the novel coincides with the rise of the professional woman writer (and a sharp increase in female literacy); the novel’s fate would be in large part determined by the female pen. Lectures will provide a historical and visual context for these texts’ overlapping preoccupations with issues as varied as art, colonialism, landscape, economics, theatre, urbanization, and print culture.

Texts: Aphra Behn, Oroonoko (Norton); Eliza Haywood, Love in Excess (Broadview Press); Daniel Defoe, Moll Flanders (Oxford Univ Press); Samuel Richardson, Pamela (OUP); Charlotte Lennox, Female Quixote (OUP or Norton); Frances Burney, Evelina (OUP); Jane Austen, Mansfield Park (Norton); Mary Shelley, Frankenstein (OUP). Original publication dates listed in the syllabus; we are reading these novels in temporal sequence.

Requirements & Grading: Four 4-page papers, 15% each; Final exam, 30%; Attendance/Participation/Quiz, 10%.

E 350R • The Paperback

35505 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am MEZ 1.202
(also listed as LAH 350 )
show description

Instructor:  Barchas, J            Areas:  III / F

Unique #:  35505            Flags:  Writing

Semester:  Fall 2012            Restrictions:  English Honors

Cross-lists:  LAH 350            Computer Instruction:  n/a

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: This book-history course tracks the evolution of the modern paperback through author case studies. This survey will start with the so-called “yellowbacks” sold in Victorian railway stations in the 1870s and proceed through to today’s paperbacks as they compete with e-books. We shall linger on the marketing hotspots and explosions of cheap books in 1890s, 1940s, and 1960s. Book covers, the canvas upon which the bulk of book marketing occurs, will be a strong bibliographical focus. The class will make extensive use of the Wolff collection of Victorian binding styles in the HRC (one of the top such collections in the world).

The class will be organized around a central case study, namely the marketing of Jane Austen’s novels from 1833 to now, but will ask every student to pick another major author initially published before 1850, whose work was subsequently reissued in paperback form across the entire historical span of this course. This will allow us to identify which marketing techniques are specific to an author and which are generic to the evolution of the modern book. In the fall of 2012, this class will intersect and take advantage of the TILTS lecture series on “The Fate of he Book.”

Required Readings:

--Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice (1813) and two further 19th-c novels (determined by student interest)

--Phil Baines, Penguin by Design: a Cover Story 1935-2005 (Alen Lane, 2007)

--Nicholson Baker, Size of Thoughts (1997)

--Leah Price, How to Do Things with Books in Victorian Britain (Princeton, 2012)

And selections from:

--John Carter and Nicolas Barker, ABC for Book Collectors.  8th edn (Delaware, 2004).

--Gerard Genette, Paratexts: The Thresholds of Interpretation (1987); English translation by Jane E. Lewin (Cambridge, 1997).

--The Cambridge History of the Book in Britain, 4 vols. (Cambridge, 1998).

--Philip Gaskell, A New Introduction to Bibliography (Oxford, 1972); corrected rpt. 1974, paperback rpt. Oak Knoll, 1995.

--G. Thomas Tanselle, Book Jackets: Their History, Forms, and Use (Bibliographical Society of the U of Virginia, forthcoming 2011)

Requirements & Grading: Participation, 15%; 3 essays and an annotated bibliography (2 short essays of 3-4 pp each, and one longer essay of 6-8 pp), 60%; In-class conference-style presentations, 25%.

E 314L • Reading Lit In Context-Hon

34575 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 800am-930am MEZ 2.202
show description

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: “REWRITINGS, REREADINGS” —

Designed for potential English majors who are already in the Honors I program, this course is directed toward developing and honing critical reading, writing, and research skills while also giving an overview of the critical “toolbox” available to students of literature in the field of English. We will focus on three major fictions written between 1700 and 1850 (by Defoe, Swift, and Bronte) that have not only inspired each other but generated clusters of later fictional rewritings by writers almost as famous (Coetzee, du Maurier, Ryss, and Perkins-Gilman). In our study of intertextuality, our reading will loosely track the development of the novel genre over several centuries as well as the compounding influence(s) of early writers upon later ones. We will also consider several key film “adaptations,” including Hitchcock’s Rebecca, since these, too, constitute critical and cultural interpretations of a sort. For each central work that we study, we will examine its formalist elements (there will be visits to the HRC to work with original editions), historical contexts, and the cultural contests it has inspired, particularly in the form of rewritings. Students will be introduced to research tools such as the OED, MLA Bibliography, and the DNB, as well as primary text databases such as ECCO, 19-C, and LION. Secondary criticism will feature a range of approaches, likely including Marxist, Feminist, Psychoanalytic, and Textual Studies. 

Texts: REQUIRED: Daniel Defoe, Robinson Crusoe, ed. Schinagel (Norton edition) – 1719; J. M. Coetzee, Foe (Penguin) – 1986; Jonathan Swift, Gulliver’s Travels, ed. Rivero (Norton) – 1726; Charlotte Bronte, Jane Eyre (Penguin) – 1847; Daphne du Maurier, Rebecca – 1938; Jean Ryss, Wide Sargasso Sea, ed. Raiskin (Norton) – 1993.

ADDITIONAL: Film: Rebecca, directed by Alfred Hitchcock – 1940. Short story: Charlotte Perkins Gilman, “The Yellow Wallpaper” – 1892.

Requirements & Grading: Three close-reading essays (3 pages each; 1 rewrite): 50%; One long essay (6 pages): 20%; Class presentation/written movie review (2 pages): 10%; Class presentation/annotated bibliography (5 items) 10%; Participation/quizzes: 10%.

E 327 • English Novel In 18th Century

35475 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 800am-930am PAR 208
show description

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: The generic label “novel” did not come into general use until the 1780s. Yet long before then writers and readers acknowledged that a “new species of writing” was rapidly transforming the literary scene (even if they couldn’t agree on what to call it). “Novel” is ultimately an apt name for a genre that experimented broadly (and, broadly, every publication was an experiment during these formative years) with both narrative content and printed self-presentation. This class explores the emergence of the British novel over the course of “the long eighteenth century,” from 1688 to 1816. Although this class includes study of a pivotal work by Defoe and consideration of the famous Fielding and Richardson rivalry, it dedicates the bulk of its attention to important fictions by early women writers. It is not coincidental that the rise of the novel coincides with the rise of the professional woman writer (and a sharp increase in female literacy); the novel’s fate would be in large part determined by the female pen. Lectures will provide a historical and visual context for these texts’ overlapping preoccupations with issues as varied as art, colonialism, landscape, economics, theatre, urbanization, and print culture.

Texts: Aphra Behn, Oroonoko (Norton); Eliza Haywood, Love in Excess (Broadview Press); Daniel Defoe, Moll Flanders (Oxford Univ Press); Samuel Richardson, Pamela (OUP); Charlotte Lennox, Female Quixote (OUP or Norton); Frances Burney, Evelina (OUP); Jane Austen, Mansfield Park (Norton); Mary Shelley, Frankenstein (OUP). Original publication dates listed in the syllabus; we are reading these novels in temporal sequence.

Requirements & Grading: Four 4-page papers, 15% each; Final exam, 30%; Attendance/Participation/Quiz, 10%.

E 314L • Lit Contests/-Texts-Pl I Hon

33850 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm MEZ 2.202
show description

Course Description: “REWRITINGS, REREADINGS” —

Designed for potential English majors who are already in the Honors I program, this course is directed toward developing and honing critical reading, writing, and research skills while also giving an overview of the critical “toolbox” available to students of literature in the field of English. We will focus on three major fictions written between 1700 and 1850 (by Defoe, Swift, and Bronte) that have not only inspired each other but generated clusters of later fictional rewritings by writers almost as famous (Coetzee, du Maurier, Ryss, and Perkins-Gilman). In our study of intertextuality, our reading will loosely track the development of the novel genre over several centuries as well as the compounding influence(s) of early writers upon later ones. We will also consider several key film “adaptations,” including Hitchcock’s Rebecca, since these, too, constitute critical and cultural interpretations of a sort. For each central work that we study, we will examine its formalist elements (there will be visits to the HRC to work with original editions), historical contexts, and the cultural contests it has inspired, particularly in the form of rewritings. Students will be introduced to research tools such as the OED, MLA Bibliography, and the DNB, as well as primary text databases such as ECCO, 19-C, and LION.  Secondary criticism will feature a range of approaches, likely including Marxist, Feminist, Psychoanalytic, and Textual Studies. 

Texts: REQUIRED: Daniel Defoe, Robinson Crusoe, ed. Schinagel (Norton edition) – 1719; J. M. Coetzee, Foe (Penguin) – 1986; Jonathan Swift, Gulliver’s Travels, ed. Rivero (Norton) – 1726; Charlotte Bronte, Jane Eyre (Penguin) – 1847; Daphne du Maurier, Rebecca – 1938; Jean Ryss, Wide Sargasso Sea, ed. Raiskin (Norton) – 1993.

ADDITIONAL: Film: Rebecca, directed by Alfred Hitchcock – 1940. Short story: Charlotte Perkins Gilman, “The Yellow Wallpaper” – 1892.

Grading: Three close-reading essays (3 pages each; 1 rewrite): 50%; One long essay (6 pages): 20%; Class presentation/written movie review (2 pages): 10%; Class presentation/annotated bibliography (5 items) 10%; Participation/quizzes: 10%.

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.  

E 384K • Graphic Design & Literary Text

34985 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 930am-1100am HRC 2.212
show description

How does a book’s appearance affect its interpretation? 

This course considers not only the impact of editorial theory upon the life of a literary text but the manner in which the non-verbal, or paratextual, elements of a literary work (layout, punctuation, front matter, title page, illustration, footnotes, mise en page, etc.) impact literary study.  This class provides students with a broad based understanding of the history of the book.  In the process of examining many items at the HRC, it will expose students to the fundamental tenets and problematics of editorial theory, as these impact every aspect of literary studies – regardless of specialty in historical period or genre.  Thus, this is not a class in a single historical period, rather it will range across book history from incunabula to Nabokov.  Indeed the interests and particular research expertise of the students who take the class will, partly, determine the works and authors considered.  The class will meet in the HRC and make extensive use of its collections during every session, in an effort to illustrated the editorial dilemmas under discussion through the examination of concrete examples.   

Requirements

Student presentations (for a total of 35%)

Academic Book review (1000-1200 words; 15%) 

Co-Curating a small Exhibit at the HRC (group grade; 10%)
   
Final Article-Length Inquiry  (15-20 double-spaced pages; 40%).

Readings

Gerard Genette, Paratexts: Thresholds of Interpretation (CUP, 1997).
Laurence Sterne, Tristram Shandy, ed. Ian Campbell Ross (Oxford World Classics, 1983)
John Carter, ABC for Book Collectors, 6th ed. [or later] (Oak Knoll Books, 1992).

In addition, there is a course anthology that includes essays on editorial theory, textual studies, image and text, and bibliography. 

E 379M • Jane Austen On Location-Eng

83320 • Summer 2010
Meets
show description

Restricted to participants in the Oxford Summer Program

Previously offered as E 379M, Jane Austen’s Landscapes

Course Description:

This class reads four novels by Jane Austen in the context of the real-world locations that served as settings for her stories and her life. We will read Sense and Sensibility (1811), Pride and Prejudice (1813), Persuasion (1818), and Northanger Abbey (1818) and visit country estates and towns featured in these fictions. Like the heroine of Pride and Prejudice, we will tour famous landscapes and extant eighteenth-century gardens, particularly those of Blenheim, West Wycombe, and Prior Park. In the century prior to the publication of Austen’s works, British landscape architecture had changed dramatically–as the manicured French-inspired symmetrical garden, with its clipped hedges, fountains, and mazes, gave way to the sweeping sheep-dotted vistas of Capability Brown. Austen’s novels comment on how these aesthetic alterations to the landscape reflect moral, religious, and political changes in British culture. Persuasion prominently features the city of Bath, where Austen and her family lived for many years. Our visit to locales in Bath will link place and characterization. We will also travel through the Hampshire countryside to the village of Chawton, where Austen’s former home is now a museum, and to Winchester Cathedral, where she lies buried. We will end the term with Northanger Abbey, which not only provides us with an alternative judgment of the city of Bath but offers a marvelous overview of how Classical sensibilities give way to (and compete with) the Romantic and the Gothic in Austen’s time. With many Regency gardens and period architecture still extant in Oxford’s own environs, we will spend as much time as possible outdoors—reconstructing both Austen’s real world and her imagined one.

Texts:

(Note: under no circumstances purchase the all-in-one Penguin edition of Austen’s novels; it is unwieldy, lacks explanatory notes, and seems virtually unreadable due to small type.)

Sense and Sensibility, Ross Ballaster, ed. (Penguin, 2003); Pride and Prejudice, Vivien Jones, ed. (Penguin, 2003); Northanger Abbey, Marilyn Butler, ed. (Penguin, 2003); Persuasion, Gillian Beer, ed. (Penguin, 2003).

Grading:

3 research reports of 2 pages each (20% each); 2 interpretive essays of 2 pages each  (10 % each); Participation and attendance  (20%).

Prerequisites:

Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

For more information, please download the full syllabus.

E 327 • English Novel In 18th Cen-W

34750 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 800-930 PAR 306
show description

E327-W: “The English Novel in the Eighteenth Century” (Spring 2010)

Unique #: 34750
Substantial Writing Course (SWC)/Writing Flag
Time and location:  TTh 8-9:30 pm in PAR 306
Instructor:  Prof. Barchas

Contact details:

  • Office: Calhoun 209
  • Office hours: T, Th 9:45-11:15
  • E-mail: barchas@mail.utexas.edu
  • Phone: 471-8379

Prescribed texts (available at the Co-Op) in order of reading:

Aphra Behn, Oroonoko (Norton); Eliza Haywood, Love in Excess (Broadview Press); Daniel Defoe, Moll Flanders (Oxford Univ Press); Samuel Richardson, Pamela (OUP); Charlotte Lennox, Female Quixote (OUP or Norton); Frances Burney, Evelina (OUP); Jane Austen, Mansfield Park (Norton); Mary Shelley, Frankenstein (OUP).  Original publication dates listed below; we are reading these novels in temporal sequence.

Students with Disabilities:

Students with disabilities may request appropriate academic accommodations from the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities, 471-6259.

For more information, please download the full syllabus.

E 314L • Lit Contest/-Text-Pl I Hon-W

34280 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 930-1100 MEZ 2.202
show description

E314L- W: Literary Contests and Contexts: “REWRITINGS, REREADINGS” (Plan I Honors)

Fall 2009, Unique #: 34280
Instructor: Professor Barchas
Office: Calhoun 209 Office phone and voicemail: 471-8379
Office hours: Th 12:30-3:00 E-mail: barchas@mail.utexas.edu

Note: this is a freshmen Honors Seminar with a Substantial Writing Component

Course Description:

Designed for potential English majors who are already in the Honors I program, this course is directed toward developing and honing critical reading, writing, and research skills while also giving an overview of the critical “toolbox” available to students of literature in the field of English. We will focus on three major fictions written between 1700 and 1850 (by Defoe, Swift, and Brontë) that have not only inspired each other but generated clusters of later fictional rewritings by writers almost as famous (Coetzee, du Maurier, Ryss, and Perkins-Gilman). In our study of intertextuality, our reading will loosely track the development of the novel genre over several centuries as well as the compounding influence(s) of early writers upon later ones. We will also consider several key film “adaptations,” including Hitchcock’s Rebecca, since these, too, constitute critical and cultural interpretations of a sort. For each central work that we study, we will examine its formalist elements (there will be visits to the HRC to work with original editions), historical contexts, and the cultural contests it has inspired, particularly in the form of rewritings. Students will be introduced to research tools such as the OED, MLA Bibliography, and the DNB, as well as primary text databases such as ECCO, 19-C, and LION. Secondary criticism will expose students to a wide range of approaches to these works trialed by others, likely including Marxist, Feminist, Psychoanalytic, and Textual Studies.

Students with Disabilities:

Students with disabilities may request appropriate academic accommodations from the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities, 471-6259.

For further information, please download the full syllabus.

Selected Publications

Books & Editions

Matters of Fact in Jane Austen: History, Location, and Celebrity (Johns Hopkins University Press 2012).

Graphic Design, Print Culture, and the Eighteenth-Century Novel (Cambridge University Press, 2003). Reprinted: April 2004. Paperback:  November 2008. Prize: SHARP Book History Prize.

The Annotations in Lady Bradshaigh’s Copy of Clarissa, with the editorial collaboration of Gordon Fulton, ELS Monograph Series, No. 76 (Victoria, 1998). 144 pgs.

Volume 1 (1700-1735) of Eighteenth-Century British Erotica Set II, 5 vols., gen. eds. Alexander Pettit and Patrick Spedding  (Pickering & Chatto, 2004). 523 pgs.

Recent Articles & Chapters

“A Big Name: Jane Austen and the Wentworths,” in Wentworth Castle and Georgian Political Gardening, ed. Patrick Eyres (Wentworth Castle Heritage Trust, Yorkshire, Aug. 2012), 161-175.

Digitally Reconstructing the Reynolds Retrospective Attended by Jane Austen in 1813: A Report on e-Work-in-progress,” Aphra Behn Online: Interactive Journal for Women in the Arts 1640-1830 (March 2012).

“The Real Bluebeard of Bath: A Historical Model for Northanger Abbey,” Persuasions 32 (2010): 115-134.

“Artistic Names in Austen’s Fiction: Cameo Appearances by Prominent Painters,” Persuasions 31 (2009): 145-162.

“Hell-Fire Jane: Austen and the Dashwoods of West Wycombe,” Eighteenth-Century Life 33.3 (Fall 2009): 1-36. Reprinted as “Dashwood Celebrity” in Sensibilities (Feb 2011), journal of the Jane Austen Society of Australia.

“Mapping Northanger Abbey: Or, Why Austen’s Bath of 1803 Resembles Joyce’s Dublin of 1904,” Review of English Studies, New Series, 60.245 (June 2009): 431-59.  Distinction: RES “Editor’s Choice”

“Mrs. Gaskell’s North and South: Austen’s Early Legacy,” Persuasions 30 (2008): 53-66.

“Very Austen: Accounting for the Language of Emma,” Nineteenth-Century Literature 62.3 (Dec 2007): 303-338.


Digital Project

“What Jane Saw,” a website supported by a grant from LAITS.  This site reconstructs the museum exhibit of 141 paintings by Sir Joshua Reynolds that Jane Austen attended on 24 May 1813. Site launches 24 May 2013—the 200th anniversary of the original event. 

Selected Honors

  • Humanities Research Award, University of Texas ($15,000 over 3 years; 2010-2013)
  • American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) Fellowship (2007-2008)
  • Alpha of Texas Award for Distinction in Teaching, from Phi Beta Kappa Society of University of Texas (May 2005)
  • Katherine Pantzer Fellowship in the British Book Trades, Bibliographical Society of America (March 2005)
  • Prize for "Best Book of 2003" from Society for the History of Authorship, Reading, and Publishing (SHARP), awarded for Graphic Design, Print Culture, and the Eighteenth-Century Novel
  • Newberry Library/ASECS Short-Term Fellowship (Jan-March 1997)
  • Bibliographical Society of America Fellowship (1996)

Recent Talks and Lectures

“Naming Names in Pride and Prejudice,” Plenary speaker at AGM of Jane Austen Society of North America (JASNA), Minneapolis – scheduled for Sept 2013  See: http://jasna.org/agms/minneapolis/plenary.html     

“Has Jane Austen Jumped the Shark?” (roundtable), American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies (ASECS), Cleveland -- April 2013

“What Jane Saw,” University of Michigan (18thC Group), Ann Arbor -- March 2013

“What Jane Austen Saw at the Reynolds Retrospective in London,” Jane Austen Society of Australia (JASA), Sydney -- 18 Feb 2012

“Jane Austen between the Covers,” The Centre for the Book, Univ of Otago, Dunedin --30 Jan 2012

“Dashwood Celebrity,” JASA, Sydney -- 2 July 2011

“What Jane Saw: Sir Joshua Reynolds in 1813,” David Nicol Smith Conference, Melbourne, Australia -- July 2011

“The Abnormally Interesting Wentworths,” American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies (ASECS), Vancouver -- March 2011       

“The Real Bluebeard of Bath: a historical model for Northanger Abbey,” Jane Austen Society of North America (JASNA), Portland, OR -- October 2010

“A Big Name: Austen and the Wentworths,” Wentworth Castle, Yorkshire – 7 August 2010

“’Real Solemn History’ in Austen’s Northanger Abbey, A. K. Smith Visiting Scholar Lecture, Trinity College, CT -- 25 Feb 2010            

 

Boards

Editorial Board of The Eighteenth-Century Novel since 2003.

Advisory Board of Eighteenth-Century Studies (term 1 July 2011- 30 June 2014).

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