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Martin Kevorkian, Chair CAL 226, Mailcode B5000, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-4991

Jeffrey Barnouw

Professor Emeritus Ph.D., 1969, Yale University

Jeffrey Barnouw

Biography

Jeffrey Barnouw holds a Ph.D from Yale and is a professor in the English Department. His research interests Include: Literature and Philosophy, Literature and Music, History of Critical Theory and Rhetoric, and The Enlightenment.

Interests

Literature and philosophy; literature and music; history of critical theory and rhetoric; the Enlightenment.

E 379N • The Enlightenment-W

35115 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm PAR 304
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E379N: The Enlightenment  (35115)

Professor Barnouw Spring 2010       Crosslisted: CL 323  (33300)        
Tu Th 2-3:30                       Parlin 304   barnouw@yahoo.com
Office Hours: Tu Th 12:30-2 Parlin 319 barnouw@mail.utexas.edu

Texts:

  • Mandeville, The Fable of the Bees, Liberty Fund paperback  0 86597 075 0
  • Johnson, The Major Works,Oxford World’s Classics  0 19 284042 8
  • Hume, Selected Essays,Oxford World's Classics 0 19 283621 8
  • Hume, Dialogues concerning Natural Religion, Oxford World's Classics 0 19 283876 8
  • Voltaire, Letters concerning the English Nation, Oxford World's Classics 0 19 283708 7
  • Voltaire, Candide & related writings, Hackett 0 87220 546 0
  • Diderot, Rameau's Nephew & D'Alembert's Dream Penguin Books 0 14 044173 5
  • Rousseau, The Basic Political Writings, Hackett 0 87220 047 7
  • Kant, Perpetual Peace & other Essays, Hackett 0 915145 47 2 

Grading:

The final grade will be based on three papers (two 5-page, one 6-page) 25% each, an oral report and class participation, together 25%. Plus/minus grading will be used for this course. Attendance is required. More than three unexcused absences may result in a lower grade, more than five unexcused absences in failure for the course. Students will have access to the course’s Blackboard site through UT Direct.

Policies:

Students with disabilities may request appropriate academic accommodations from the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities, 471-6259.

Submitting as one’s own work passages taken from other sources, printed or on-line, is plagiarism and will result in a punitive failure for the course. The papers do not need to (although they certainly may) use ‘outside’ sources.

It is your own understanding of texts and issues, your own judgment, and (as a bonus) your imagination, subtlety, wit that I am most eager to see and appreciate. Every paper must have a title that indicates its main thrust. Please feel free to discuss your ideas with me beforehand. One rewrite of either the first or second paper is possible.

For more information, please download the full syllabus.

E 320M • Literature And Music-W

34970 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm PAR 101
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Literature and Music, Fall 2009

E320M (34970)  /  CL323 (33430)
TuTh 12:30 - 2:00  /  Parlin 101                                              

Prof. Barnouw
Phone: (512) 471-4045  /  email: barnouw@yahoo.com
Office Hours: TuTh 2:00 – 3:25  /  Parlin 319  /  barnouw@mail.utexas.edu

      

Grading: 

The course grade will be based on the three papers, totalling 16 pages (60% of total grade), an in-class oral presentation (20%) and participation in discussion (20%). Attendance is required. More than three unexcused absences may result in a lower grade, more than five unexcused absences may result in failure for the course. Students will have access to the course’s Blackboard site through UT Direct.

Policies:

Students with disabilities may request appropriate academic accommodations from the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities, 471-6259.

Submitting as one’s own work passages taken from other sources, printed or on-line, is plagiarism and will result in a punitive failure for the course. The papers do not need to (although they certainly may) use ‘outside’ sources.

It is your own understanding of works and issues, your own judgment, and (as a bonus) your imagination, subtlety, wit that I am most eager to see and appreciate. Every paper must have a title which indicates the main thrust of the paper. Please feel free to discuss your ideas with me beforehand. One rewrite of either the first or second paper is possible.

For more information, please download the full course syllabus.

E 379N • Homer In Translation-W

35295 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm BEN 1.126
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E379N: Homer in Translation (35295)

TuTh 3:30-5  /  Benedict 1.126  /  Fall 09 
Prof. Barnouw  /  Phone: 471-4045  /  email: barnouw@yahoo.com
Office Hours: TuTh 2:00-3:25  /  Parlin 319  /  email: barnouw@mail.utexas.edu

Texts:

  • Homer, The Iliad, tr. Robert Fagles, Penguin Classics paper  0140445927
  • Homer, The Odyssey, tr. Albert Cook, Norton Critical Edition  0393964051
  • Latacz, Homer. His Art and His World, Univ. of Michigan Pr  0472083538
  • Barnouw, Odysseus, Hero of Practical Intelligence University Press of America  076183026X

Grading:

The course grade will be based on the three papers, 16 pages in all (5, 5, 6), an oral report and participation in class discussion, five factors weighted more or less equally, although consideration will be given for improvement. Attendance is required. More than three unexcused absences may result in a lower grade, more than five unexcused absences in failure for the course. Students will have access to the course’s Blackboard site through UT Direct.

Policies:

Students with disabilities may request appropriate academic accommodations from the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities, 471-6259.

Submitting as one’s own work passages taken from other sources, printed or on-line, is plagiarism and will result in a punitive failure for the course. The papers do not need to (although they certainly may) use ‘outside’ sources.

It is your own understanding of texts and issues, your own judgment, and (as a bonus) your imagination, subtlety, wit that I am most eager to see and appreciate. Every paper must have a title that indicates its main thrust. Please feel free to discuss your ideas with me beforehand. One rewrite of either the first or second paper is possible.

For more information, please download the full course syllabus.

Publications

"Britain and European Literature and Thought." In The Cambridge History of English Literature, 1660-1780 (pp.423-444). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2005.

"Odysseus, Hero of Practical Intelligence. Deliberation and Signs in Homer's Odyssey." Lanham, Maryland: University Press of America, 2004.

"Learning from Experience, or Not: From Chrysippus to Rasselas." Studies in Eighteenth-Century Culture, 33, 313-336, September 2004.

Propositional Perception. Phantasia, Predication and Sign in Plato, Aristotle and the Stoics. Lanham, Maryland: University Press of America, 2002.

"Bible, science et souverainete chez Bacon et Hobbes." Revue de Theologie et de Philosophie, 133, 247-265, 2001.

"The Beginnings of 'Aesthetics' and the Leibnizian Conception of Sensation." In P. Mattick (Ed.), Eighteenth-Century Aesthetics and the Reconstruction of Art (pp.52-95). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 1993.

"Passion as 'Confused' Perception or Thought in Descartes, Malebranche and Hutcheson." Journal of the History of Ideas, 53, 397-424, September 1992.

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