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David Birdsong, Chair 201 W 21ST STREET STOP B7600, HRH 2.114A, AUSTIN, TX 78712 • 512-471-5531

Barbara E. Bullock

Professor Ph.D., Delaware (Linguistics)

Barbara E. Bullock

Contact

Biography

I am a linguist with an original specialization in the study of phonology and phonetics--the sound structure of language-- but my interests in language are wide ranging. My current research program, which I conduct in collaboration with colleagues and students, is devoted to empirical investigations of the effect of bilingualism and language contact on linguistic structure. My interests lie generally in exploring the Romance language diaspora in the Americas, particularly among rural populations who have little to no formal education in French, Spanish, and Haitian Creole and whose linguistic forms are all too often denigrated. Currently, I am the Project Director, with Almeida Jacqueline Toribio, of the Spanish in Texas Project which is developing a corpus of authentic speech from sociolinguistic, video interviews with Spanish speakers all over the state. Our team has developed a process by which these videos can be searched by teachers, learners, and researchers for structural and thematic properties thus allowing the corpus to be easily exploited for pedagogical purposes. We are working to improve our abilities to annotate oral, mixed-language corpora.

A fundamental aspect of my research program has involved fieldwork in two locations: in the linguistic enclave community of Frenchville, Pennsylvania, a village, which was in its last stages of a language shift from a bilingual French-English community to an English monolingual one and, on the island of Hispaniola along the border between the Dominican Republic and Haiti. Aside from fieldwork, I also conduct laboratory research on bilinguals and language learners on various aspects of bilingual speech, including code-switching and phonetic convergence. I have also recently begun to explore the power of corpus linguistics and natural language processing as effective tools in research on bilingual speech forms. I am the co-editor of The Cambridge Handbook of Linguistic Code-switching and of a special issue on linguistic convergence for the journal, Bilingualism: Language and Cognition

 

Interests

Bilingualism and language contact, language variation and change, hypercorrection, accommodation, lab phonology & sociophonetics, corpus

FR 324L • Practical Phonetics

36960 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm MEZ 2.124
show description

This course has a dual emphasis on descriptive phonetics and on its practical application to improve your pronunciation and auditory discrimination of French. By the end of the semester you should be able to:

  1. Read and correctly produce phonetic transcriptions of French.
  2. Transcribe written and oral French into IPA.
  3. Describe the relationship between spelling and pronunciation.
  4. Describe how French sounds are produced.
  5. Describe the basic intonation, rhythm and stress patterns of French.
  6. Discriminate between sounds that are difficult for Anglophones or Hispanophones to perceive.
  7. Perceive and produce liaison and enchaînement in obligatory contexts.
  8. Demonstrate a marked improvement in your listening skills and in your own pronunciation of French.

FR 392K • Sociophonetics

37035 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm WEL 4.224
show description

FR392K: Sociophonetics

Unique number: 37035

TTh 11-12:30

MEZ1.104

Speakers constantly index aspects of their identity not only through the content of their utterances but through the form the utterance takes. Sociophonetic research examines the intersection between variation in phonetic/phonological form and social factors (such as a speaker’s region, age, group identity, ethnic background, sexual orientation, level of education, and the like.) It is concerned not only with the acoustic production of variation but also with the effects of sociophonetic variation on speech perception, on language change, and on language acquisition. This course is a practical introduction to this relatively young field with a focus on the sociolinguistic principles of linguistic variation. We will discuss the conceptual underpinnings of this interdisciplinary field and we will explore its analytical methods. This will be a “hands on” course; we will learn what type of phonetic/phonological variation to measure, how to measure it, and how to design and conduct experiments based. Most of the extant work in sociophonetics so far has analyzed variation in English. Here, we will consider how it has been and can be applied to variation in other languages. Knowledge of the sound patterns of the language that you wish to investigate is useful.

Prerequisites:

None; although you must have an understanding of basic descriptive linguistics. Experience with PRAAT is extremely helpful.

Required text:

Erik R. Thomas. 2011. Sociophonetics: An introduction. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.
Research articles available through Zotero, Canvas, or the library.

Evaluation:
Critical reviews of research articles: 45%
Pilot research project: 30%
Active class involvement and preparation: 25%

 

 

FR 322E • Advanced French II

37300 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm MEZ 2.122
show description

Ce cours de langue avancée a pour but principal d’améliorer vos compétences linguistiques en français (i.e., la compréhension auditive, l’expression orale, la lecture, et l’expression écrite) ainsi que votre connaissance de la grammaire et du lexique. Dans ce cours, vous aurez l’occasion de discuter des controverses sociales dans le monde francophone et aux Etats-Unis (e.g, la mondialistion, l’immigration, le système éducatif, etc.). A l’aide des textes contemporains, vous allez apprendre à mieux communiquer vos pensées en français en comparant la culture française avec la nôtre. 

FR 324L • Practical Phonetics

37310 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm BEN 1.108
show description

This course has a dual emphasis on descriptive phonetics and on its practical application to improve your pronunciation and auditory discrimination of French. By the end of the semester you should be able to:

  1. Read and correctly produce phonetic transcriptions of French.
  2. Transcribe written and oral French into IPA.
  3. Describe the relationship between spelling and pronunciation.
  4. Describe how French sounds are produced.
  5. Describe the basic intonation, rhythm and stress patterns of French.
  6. Discriminate between sounds that are difficult for Anglophones or Hispanophones to perceive.
  7. Perceive and produce liaison and enchaînement in obligatory contexts.
  8. Demonstrate a marked improvement in your listening skills and in your own pronunciation of French.

FR 396K • Lab Approaches To Romance Phon

37215 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm MEZ 1.104
show description

Laboratory phonology is a methodological approach that allows researchers to explore the connections between phonetics and phonology. In general terms, this approach encourages the use of the empirical methods of phonetics to test the theoretical and descriptive claims of phonology and it has become a leading paradigm for research on linguistic sound systems. Laboratory approaches have also been fruitfully extended to explore related areas such as language variation and change and bilingual perception and production.

Goals: (1) to encourage you to explore the major descriptive and theoretical issues presented by the Romance languages and (2) to prepare you to conduct laboratory research on the sound systems of Romance languages.

Readings with cover three major areas and will be chosen “organically” (i.e., directed by your interests):

  • Segmental level issues: contrast, “quasi-contrast”, assimilation, co-articulation, sandhi processes, vowel reduction
  • Prosodic level issues: stress and pitch accent, syllable structure, phrasing, lengthening/shortening
  • Cross-dialectal or cross-linguistic production and perception

Materials:

All readings will be posted on the course delivery system.

You should have PRAAT pre-installed on your computer.

Evaluation:

Active class involvement and preparation:       25%

Critical reviews of research articles:       25%

Independent research project:       50%  

 

FR 322E • Advanced French II

36825 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm MEZ B0.302
show description

Ce cours de langue avancée a pour but principal d’améliorer vos compétences linguistiques en français (i.e., la compréhension auditive, l’expression orale, la lecture, et l’expression écrite) ainsi que votre connaissance de la grammaire et du lexique. Dans ce cours, vous aurez souvent l’occasion de discuter des controverses sociales dans le monde francophone et aux Etats-Unis (e.g, la mondialisation, l’immigration, la politique, le système éducatif, etc.). 

FR 324L • Practical Phonetics

36835 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm BEN 1.108
show description

This course has a dual emphasis on descriptive phonetics and on its practical application to improve your pronunciation and auditory discrimination of French. By the end of the semester you should be able to:

  1. Read and correctly produce phonetic transcriptions of French.
  2. Transcribe written and oral French into IPA.
  3. Describe the relationship between spelling and pronunciation.
  4. Describe how French sounds are produced.
  5. Describe the basic intonation, rhythm and stress patterns of French.
  6. Discriminate between sounds that are difficult for Anglophones or Hispanophones to perceive.
  7. Perceive and produce liaison and enchaînement in obligatory contexts.
  8. Demonstrate a marked improvement in your listening skills and in your own pronunciation of French.

FR 392K • French In Contact

36860 • Fall 2012
Meets MW 200pm-330pm HRH 2.106C
show description

This seminar is devoted to an examination of contact-­‐induced language change in French and in languages in contact with French.

FR 322E • Advanced French II

36680 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm MEZ B0.302
show description

Description of FR322E

 

FR 322E • Advanced French II

Prerequisites

FR 320E with a grade of at least a C

Course Description

This course will be taught in French.

The objective of this course is to improve all four language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) through a series of communicative tasks (compositions, listening comprehension activities, dictations, oral practice, etc.). Emphasis is placed on diversifying vocabulary, mastering a wider range of grammatical structures, increasing fluency, and developing appropriate rhetorical strategies for essay writing in French. And finally, participants can expect to learn about social issues in the French-speaking world (e.g. role of media in society, immigration, globalization, education, etc.)

Grading Policy

Chapter Exams (4 x 10%) 40%

Oral Exams  (3 x 5%) 15%


Compositions  (4 x 5%) 20%

Daily Assignments  15%

Final Project  10%

FINAL EXAM: NO

Texts

Oukada, Larbi. 2nd Ed. 2012. Controverses. Boston: Thomson/Cengage Heinle. (ISBN textbook 9780495797777; workbook 9781439082065): Required

Hawkins, French Grammar and Usage, (2nd edition), 2001, MCG, ISBN: 9780658017988: Recommended

Oxford, Compact Oxford Hachette French Dictionary, 3rd Ed., Oxford University Press, ISBN: 9780198610717: Recommended

FR 392K • Sociophonetics

36725 • Fall 2011
Meets MW 330pm-500pm HRH 2.112
show description

Speakers constantly index aspects of their identity not only through the content of their utterances but through the form the utterance takes. Sociophonetic research examines the intersection between variation in phonetic/phonological form and social factors (such as a speaker’s region, age, group identity, ethnic background, sexual orientation, level of education, and the like.) It is concerned not only with the acoustic production of variation but also with the effects of sociophonetic variation on speech perception, on language change, and on language acquisition.

This course is both a theoretical and practical introduction to this relatively young field. We will discuss the theoretical underpinnings of this interdisciplinary field and we will explore its analytical methods. This will be a “hands on” course; we will learn what type of phonetic/phonological variation to measure, how to measure it, and how to design and conduct experiments.

Most of the extant work in sociophonetics so far has analyzed variation in English. Here, we will consider how it has been and can be applied to variation in the Romance languages, particularly in French and Spanish. If you have your own data, you will be encouraged to analyze it in this class.

Prerequisites: You must have an understanding of basic articulatory phonetics (i.e., how sounds are categorized.)

Required text:

Erik R. Thomas. 2011. Sociophonetics: An introduction. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.
Research articles posted on Blackboard.

Potentially required text:
Mariana Di Paolo & Malcah Yaeger-Dror. 2010. Sociophonetics: A student guide. NY: Routledge. 

Evaluation:

Presentations of exercises: 30%
Critical reviews of research articles: 30%
Pilot research project: 30%
Active class involvement and preparation: 10%

 

 

FR 322E • Advanced French II

36410 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm BEN 1.106
show description

 Prerequisites

FR 320E with a grade of at least a C


Course Description

This course will be taught in French.

The objective of this course is to improve all four language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) through a series of communicative tasks (compositions, listening comprehension activities, dictations, oral practice, etc.). Emphasis is placed on diversifying vocabulary, mastering a wider range of grammatical structures, increasing fluency, and developing appropriate rhetorical strategies for essay writing in French. And finally, participants can expect to learn about social issues in the French-speaking world (e.g. role of media in society, immigration, globalization, education, etc.)


Grading Policy

Chapter Exams (4 x 10%) 40%

Oral Exams  (3 x 5%) 15%
Compositions  (4 x 5%) 20%

Daily Assignments  15%

Final Project  10%

FINAL EXAM: NO


FR 322E • Advanced French II

36945 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 1200-100pm HRH 2.112
show description

Attachment

FR 322E • Advanced French II

36950 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm HRH 2.112
show description

Description of FR322E

 

FR 322E • Advanced French II

Prerequisites

FR 320E with a grade of at least a C

Course Description

This course will be taught in French.

The objective of this course is to improve all four language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) through a series of communicative tasks (compositions, listening comprehension activities, dictations, oral practice, etc.). Emphasis is placed on diversifying vocabulary, mastering a wider range of grammatical structures, increasing fluency, and developing appropriate rhetorical strategies for essay writing in French. And finally, participants can expect to learn about social issues in the French-speaking world (e.g. role of media in society, immigration, globalization, education, etc.)

Grading Policy

Chapter Exams (4 x 10%) 40%

Oral Exams  (3 x 5%) 15%


Compositions  (4 x 5%) 20%

Daily Assignments  15%

Final Project  10%

FINAL EXAM: NO

Texts

Oukada, Larbi. 2nd Ed. 2012. Controverses. Boston: Thomson/Cengage Heinle. (ISBN textbook 9780495797777; workbook 9781439082065): Required

Hawkins, French Grammar and Usage, (2nd edition), 2001, MCG, ISBN: 9780658017988: Recommended

Oxford, Compact Oxford Hachette French Dictionary, 3rd Ed., Oxford University Press, ISBN: 9780198610717: Recommended

Publications

Bullock, Barbara E. and Almeida Jacqueline Toribio. “Correcting the record on Dominican [s] hypercorrection.” Romance Linguistics 2009, S. Colina, A. Olarrea, and A. Carvalho (eds.). pp. 15-25. New York: John Benjamins.

Bullock, Barbara E. (2009) Prosody in contact in French: A case study from a heritage variety in the United States. The International Journal of Bilingualism. 13: 165-194.

download

Bullock, Barbara E. and Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2009. “Themes in the study of code-switching.” In The Handbook of Linguistic Code-switching, B. Bullock and A.J. Toribio (eds.), 1-17. Cambridge University Press.

Bullock, Barbara E. 2009. The phonetic reflexes of code-switching. In The Handbook of Linguistic Code-switching, B. Bullock and A.J. Toribio (eds.), 1-17. Cambridge University Press.

Barbara E. Bullock & Almeida Jacqueline Toribio. 2009. The Cambridge Handbook of Linguistic Code-switching. Cambridge/New York: The Cambridge University Press.

download

Bullock, Barbara E. and Almeida Jacqueline Toribio. 2009. Reconsidering Cibaeño Spanish: Data from the rural Cibao. Revista Internacional de Lingüística Iberoamericana 2.14: 46-74.

Bullock, Barbara E. and Luke Eilderts. 2009. Prononcer mâle ou prononcer mal: The perception of feminized speech in early modern France. The French Review 83.2: 282-294.

download

Bullock, Barbara E. & Toribio, Almedia Jacqueline. 2008. Kreyol incursions into Dominican Spanish: The perception of Haitinized Speech among Dominicans. In Mercedes Niño-Murcia and Jason Rothman, Bilingualism and Identity: Spanish and the crossroads with other languages, Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins.

Bullock, Barbara E., Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline, González, Verónica, Dalola, Amanda. 2006. Language dominance and performance outcomes in bilingual pronunciation. In M.G. O’Brien, C. Shea, J. Archibald (eds.), Proceedings of the 8th Generative Approaches to Second Language Acquisition: The Banff Conference, 9-16, Somerville, MA: Cascadilla.

download

Bullock, Barbara E. and Almeida Jacqueline Toribio. 2009. How to hit a moving target: On the sociophonetics of code-switching. In Interdisciplinary Approaches to Code-Switching, L. Isurin, D. Winford & K. de Bot (eds.), pp. 189-206. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.

Bullock, Barbara E. & Gerfen, Chip. 2005. The preservation of schwa in the converging phonological system of Frenchville French. Bilingualism: Language and Cognition 8.2: 117-130.

Graduate Students

I have worked with and am working with a number of wonderful graduate students.


Recent graduates:

Mark Amengual (2013): Mark completed his dissertation on phonetic transfer in the vowel systems of Spanish-Catalan bilinguals in 2013. His dissertation research was sponsored by an NSF DDRIG. He has just accepted a position as an Assistant Professor of Applied Linguistics at UC-Santa Cruz. We have collaborated on a number of projects on Dominican Spanish with Almeida Jacqueline Toribio.

Dan Olson (2012): Dan completed his dissertation Bilingual language contexts: Variable langauge switching costs and phonetic production. He is currently Assistant Professor of Spanish Linguistics at Purdue University. We continue to work together on the sociophonetics of code-switching.


Current PhD students in French:

Amanda Dalola: Amanda just completed her dissertation on the sociophonetics of phrase final vowel devoicing in L1 and L2 French. She has accepted a position as an Assistant Professor of French and Linguistics at the University of South Carolina.

Beki Post: Beki is writing her dissertation on Arabic-French code-switching among young adults in Morocco. Beki's research in Morocco was sponsored by an NSF DDRIG; she has presented and published widely on Arabic-French code-switching.

Anna Troyansky: Anna is embarking on her PhD research on linguistic input and language use of 1st and 2nd generation beur women in France.

Megan Oprea: Megan is collecting data for her PhD research on The effects of gender, Islam and national identity on the language attitudes of 2nd generation Maghrebis in France.


Sociophonetic Projects:

Jenna Nichols: Jenna is working on topics in the sociophonetics of North American varieties of French. She and I have been working on legacy data from Frenchville French.

Adam McBride: Adam is investigating different methods for the acoustic measurement of variable vowel nasalization in oral French corpora under my supervision.


Corpus Projects:

Jacqueline Larsen-Serigos: Jacqueline, a PhD student of Hispanic Linguistics, is a corpus linguist. We are working on several projects related to code-switching and borrowing in corpora.

Arthur Wendorf: Arthur, a PhD student of Hispanic Linguistics, is a corpus linguist with interests in L2 learning. We have collaborated on topics related to annotating mixed language data.

Adriano Trovato: Adriana, a graduate student of Hispanic Linguistics is working with me on a phonetic analysis of labial fricatives in the Spanish in Texas corpus.

 

 

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