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Sheryl Luzzadder-Beach, Chair 305 E. 23rd Street • CLA 3.306 • A3100 • Austin, Tx 78712 • 512-232-1595

Bella B. Jordan

Lecturer Ph.D., UT Austin

Bella B. Jordan

Contact

  • Phone: 512-232-9127
  • Office: Department of Slavic Languages and Literature, BUR 470
  • Campus Mail Code: F3600

Biography

Teaches Geography of the Former Soviet Union and Regions and  Cultures of Europe.

 

 

 

 

GRG 326 • Regions & Cultures Of Europe

37545 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm BUR 220
(also listed as EUS 346, REE 345 )
show description

A systematic introduction to geography of all regions of Europe, from Iceland to Sicily and European Russia and Finland to Bretagne and Galicia. The course is based on a renowned textbook by Alexander B. Murphy, Terry G. Jordan-Bychkob and Bella Bychkova Jordan and focuses on all the major aspects of the European makeup: its physical, economics, political, and cultural geography, geolinguistics and environmental issues. Special attention is given to such issues as expansion of the European Union and NATO, problems associated with immigration and ethnic tensions, challenges of multiculturalism and intergration. A significant portion of the class is dedicated to the analysis of the evolution of the European civilization during the last two millennia and resulting geographical patterns in modern Europe.

Requirements and Grading:

The grade is based on 3 exams

GRG 356T • Northern Lands And Cultures

37615 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 400pm-500pm BUR 130
(also listed as EUS 346, REE 345 )
show description

Designed to develop a geographical understanding of the Circumpolar region of the North, an ancient human habitat and a home to distinct, millenia old, civilizations. These indigenous Arctic cultures and livelihoods are being constantly challenged by modern industrial powers, and the clash between two contesting realities is profound. Emphasis is given to a historical geographical perspective on the major processes forming cultural and natural landscapes (including global warming), and influence society, economy, spiritual life and politics. Regions include: Alaska, the Canadian northern territories, Scandinavian North, including Sapmi (Lapland), Iceland, Greenland, the Russian North, and Siberia.

Requirements and Grading

The final grade for the course is based on 3 exams

GRG 327 • Geog Of Former Soviet Union

37785 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm BUR 130
(also listed as REE 345 )
show description

This course is designed to give a deeper understanding of the Post-Soviet space, focusing on the major geographic factors that define this enormous Eurasian realm, including modern and historical cultural landscapes, economy and politics of the region, demography and health, religious cultures, environmental crises, contested territories, and the most recent geopolitical developments in the region.

Readings:

A Geography of Russia and Its Neighbors. By Mikhail S. Blinnikov. 2011, NY: The Gifford Press.

Grading requirements:

1)    Students must take 2 exams, each worth 25% of the totals grade.

2)    Students will prepare an oral presentation on a topic related to the term paper and approved by the instructor. The presentation’s length should not exceed 15 minutes.

3)    Students will write a term paper, worth 30% of the final grade. The paper must be

10-12 pages long, double-spaced, typed in 12-point font. The bibliography should contain scholarly publications, including books and articles from peer-reviewed journals. 

Course prerequisite: Upper division standing.

GRG 326 • Regions & Cultures Of Europe

37800 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm BUR 220
(also listed as EUS 346, REE 345 )
show description

This course is a systematic introduction to geography of all regions of Europe, from Iceland to Sicily and European Russia and Finland to Bretagne and Galicia. The course is based on a renowned textbook by Alexander B. Murphy, Terry G. Jordan-Bychkov and Bella Bychkova Jordan and focuses on all the major aspects of the European makeup: its physical, economic, political, and cultural geography, geolinguistics and environmental issues. A special attention is given to such issues as expansion of the European Union and NATO, problems associated with immigration and ethnic tensions, challenges of multiculturalism and integration. A significant portion of the class is dedicated to the analysis of demographic, urban and agricultural patterns. The historical perspective allows the analysis of the evolution of the European civilization during the last two millennia and resulting geographical patterns in modern Europe.

Required textbook: Alexander B. Murphy, Terry G. Jordan-Bychkov and Bella Bychkova Jordan.  The European Culture Area: A Systematic Geography, 2009, 5th edition. Rowman and Littlefield: Lanham, Boulder, CO. Available at The Co-Op and amazon.com     

Course grading policy: students must take 3 exams, each worth 33.3% of the final grade. Make-up exams will be allowed only in cases of medical emergency with the written proof from the doctor’s office. There will not be a final exam.

Prerequisites: Upper division

GRG 356T • Northern Lands And Cultures

37865 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm BUR 130
(also listed as EUS 346, REE 345 )
show description

This course is designed to develop a geographical understanding of the circumpolar region of the North, an ancient human habitat and a home to distinct, millennia old, civilizations. These indigenous Arctic cultures and livelihoods are being constantly challenged by modern industrial powers, and the clash between two contesting realities is profound. Emphasis is given to a historical geographical perspective on the major processes forming cultural and natural landscapes (including global warming), and influencing society, economy, spiritual life and politics. Regions include: Alaska, the Canadian northern territories, Scandinavian North, including Sapmi (Lapland), Iceland, Greenland, the Russian North, and Siberia.

Prerequisites:  Upper division

Readings:   Course package

Grading:  Basis for the course grade:

1)      Students will take 2 exams, each worth 25% of the final grade. Total of 50 points.

2)      Students will prepare and oral presentations on a topic relevant to the course subject matter and approved by the instructor. The presentations must be 10-12 minutes long in a PowerPoint format. It accounts for 20% of the final grade.

Students will write term papers on a topic similar to that of their oral presentations. The term papers must be 10-11 pages long (not including bibliography and title page), typed double-space in 12-size font. The paper must include a map created by the students, illustrating the major points of the paper’s topic.  Late papers will not be accepted! 30% of the final grade.

GRG 327 • Geog Of Former Soviet Union

37470 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm PAR 1
(also listed as REE 345 )
show description

This course is designed to give a deeper understanding of the Post-Soviet space, focusing on the major geographic factors that define this enormous Eurasian realm, including modern and historical cultural landscapes, economy and politics of the region, demography and health, religious cultures, environmental crises, contested territories, and the most recent geopolitical developments in the region.

Prerequisites: upper division

Readings: Mikhail Blinnikov, “A Geography of Russia and Its Neighbors”, New York: The Guilford Press, 2011.

Grading: 1) students must take 2 exams, each worth 25% of the total grade. Make-up exams will be allowed only in cases of medical emergency, with the written proof from the doctor’s office. There will not be a final exam.

       2) students will present a paper on a topic relevant to the course subject matter – 20%;

      3) students will write a term paper on a topic similar to oral presentation topic – 30% of the total grade

GRG 326 • Regions & Cultures Of Europe

37370 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm PAR 1
(also listed as EUS 346, REE 345 )
show description

This course is a systematic introduction to geography of all regions of Europe, from Iceland to Sicily and European Russia and Finland to Bretagne and Galicia. The course is based on a renowned textbook by Alexander B. Murphy, Terry G. Jordan-Bychkov and Bella Bychkova Jordan and focuses on all the major aspects of the European makeup: its physical, economic, political, and cultural geography, geolinguistics and environmental issues. A special attention is given to such issues as expansion of the European Union and NATO, problems associated with immigration and ethnic tensions, challenges of multiculturalism and integration. A significant portion of the class is dedicated to the analysis of demographic, urban and agricultural patterns. The historical perspective allows the analysis of the evolution of the European civilization during the last two millennia and resulting geographical patterns in modern Europe.

Prerequisites: upper division undergraduate students

Readings: Alexander B. Murphy, Terry G. Jordan-Bychkov and Bella Bychkova Jordan.  The European Culture Area: A Systematic Geography, 2009, 5th edition. Rowman and Littlefield: Lanham, Boulder, CO. Available at The Co-Op and amazon.com

Grading: The final grade is based on 3 exams.

GRG 356T • Northern Lands And Cultures

37425 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm PAR 203
(also listed as EUS 346, REE 345 )
show description

This course is designed to develop a geographical understanding of the Circumpolar region of the North, an ancient human habitat and a home to distinct, millennia old, civilizations. These indigenous Arctic cultures and livelihoods are being constantly challenged by modern industrial powers, and the clash between two contesting realities is profound. Emphasis is given to a historical geographical perspective on the major processes forming cultural and natural landscapes (including global warming), and influence society, economy, spiritual life and politics. Regions include: Alaska, the Canadian northern territories, Scandinavian North, including Sapmi (Lapland), Iceland, Greenland, the Russian North, and Siberia.

Prerequisites: upper division undergraduate students

Readings: course package

Grading: the final grade for the course is based on 3 exams

GRG 327 • Geography Of Former Sov Union

37325 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm PAR 1
(also listed as REE 345 )
show description

Course Description

 This course is designed to give a deeper understanding of the Post-Soviet space, focusing on the major geographic factors that define this enormous Eurasian realm, including modern and historical cultural landscapes, economy and politics of the region, demography and health, religious cultures, environmental crises, contested territories, and the most recent geopolitical developments in the region. 

 

Texts:

1)   students must take 2 exams, each worth 25% of the total grade. Make-up exams will be allowed only in cases of medical emergency, with the written proof from the doctor’s office;

2)   each student will prepare an oral presentation on a topic approved by the instructor, worth 20% of the final grade;

students will submit a term paper on a topic related to the topic of the oral presentation, worth 30% of the total grade.

 

Requirements and Grading

A Geography of Russia and Its Neighbors. 2011.By Mikhail S.Blinnikov. New York: The Guilford Press.

GRG 326 • Regions & Cultures Of Europe

37320 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm BUR 136
(also listed as EUS 346, REE 345 )
show description

Course description: This course is a systematic introduction to geography of all regions of Europe, from Iceland to Sicily and European Russia and Finland to Bretagne and Galicia. The course is based on a renowned textbook by Alexander B. Murphy, Terry G. Jordan-Bychkov and Bella Bychkova Jordan and focuses on all the major aspects of the European makeup: its physical, economic, political, and cultural geography, geolinguistics and environmental issues. A special attention is given to such issues as expansion of the European Union and NATO, problems associated with immigration and ethnic tensions, challenges of multiculturalism and integration. A significant portion of the class is dedicated to the analysis of demographic, urban and agricultural patterns. The historical perspective allows the analysis of the evolution of the European civilization during the last two millennia and resulting geographical patterns in modern Europe.

Course grading policy: students must take 3 exams, each worth 33.3% of the final grade. Make-up exams will be allowed only in cases of medical emergency with the written proof from the doctor’s office. There will not be a final exam.

GRG 356T • Shamanistic Worlds

37595 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm PAR 1
(also listed as R S 373, REE 345 )
show description

This course is designed to explore the most ancient religious tradition of shamanism, vestiges of which can still be found in different regions of the world. It will focus on multiple facets of shamanism, including its major concepts, cosmology, theory and practice, roles and functions of a shaman as a mediator between the world of spirits and humans. Such important notions and phenomena associated with the figure of a shaman, as seance, trance, transcendental journey, animal cults and mother beasts, diverse paths of becoming a shaman, and other related topics will be investigated. The course draws examples from diverse scholarly sources and studies conducted in places so far apart from each other as Siberia, Peru, Sub-Saharan Africa, northern Scandinavia, East Asia, and Australia.

Course Requirements:

a) students will take 2 exams, each worth 25% of the final grade.

b) they will write a term paper on the topic selected by a student and approved by the instructor. The term paper must be double-spaced, 12-font sized, 10-12 pages long, including bibliography and a map. It will account for 30% of the final grade.

c) by the end of the semester students will deliver an oral presentation on the same topic as the term paper. The presentation will be worth 20% of the grade.

Required Readings:

The instructor will provide a list of books and articles required for the course.

GRG 326 • Regions & Cultures Of Europe

37135 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm BUR 136
(also listed as EUS 346, GRG 327, REE 345 )
show description

The land and peoples of the former Soviet Union, with an examination of such problems as ethnic tension, economic restructuring, and the quality of life.

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

GRG 327 • Regions & Cultures Of Europe

37140 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm BUR 136
(also listed as EUS 346, GRG 326, REE 345 )
show description

The land and peoples of the former Soviet Union, with an examination of such problems as ethnic tension, economic restructuring, and the quality of life.

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

Undergraduate Courses

Fall 2010 RUS 326 Adv Rus Composition & Conv I

Course Description

This course is designed to teach advanced writing and oral communication skills in the Russian language based on the use of the current Russian media, including newspaper and magazine articles, news program, DVD clips and short films.  The goal of the course is to help students learn how to master both formal and informal knowledge of contemporary Russian and the ability to discuss the most important issues of the Russian society. These will include Russian political challenges, socio-economic development, demographic and health problems, everyday life, religion and art.

Text

All course material will be provided by the instructor before the assignments in advance.

Requirements and Grading

Writing essays on topics given by the instructor—double spaced 12 font typed essays (for graduate students—2 pages long, for the undergraduates—1 page long.

Oral assignments allowing discussion in class time—once a week.

By the end of the semester, students will give one final oral paper on a topic chosen by a student and approved by the instructor.

Take home written essays—60% of the final grade.

Participation and discussion in the class—20%.

Final oral presentation 20%.

Prerequisite:

Three years of advanced level Russian courses.

Fall 2011 RUS 326/REE 385/RUS 380C

Course description: This course is designed to teach advanced writing and oral communication skills in the Russian language based on both traditional approach to grammatical and lexical studies of the language and innovative use of current Russian media, including newspaper and magazine articles, news programs, DVD clips and short films. The goal of the course is to help students learn how to master both formal and informal knowledge of contemporary Russian and ability to discuss the most important issues of the Russian society. These will include Russian current political issues, socio-economic development, demographic and health problems, ecological challenges, and everyday life.

Fall 2011 REE 345/GRG 326/EUS 346 "Regions and Cultures of Europe"

Course description: This course is a systematic introduction to geography of all regions of Europe, from Iceland to Sicily and European Russia and Finland to Bretagne and Galicia. The course is based on a renowned textbook by Alexander B. Murphy, Terry G. Jordan-Bychkov and Bella Bychkova Jordan and focuses on all the major aspects of the European makeup: its physical, economic, political, and cultural geography, geolinguistics and environmental issues. A special attention is given to such issues as expansion of the European Union and NATO, problems associated with immigration and ethnic tensions, challenges of multiculturalism and integration. A significant portion of the class is dedicated to the analysis of demographic, urban and agricultural patterns. The historical perspective allows the analysis of the evolution of the European civilization during the last two millennia and resulting geographical patterns in modern Europe.

Graduate Courses

Fall 2010 RUS 380C Adv Rus Composition & Conv I

Course Description

This course is designed to teach advanced writing and oral communication skills in the Russian language based on the use of the current Russian media, including newspaper and magazine articles, news program, DVD clips and short films.  The goal of the course is to help students learn how to master both formal and informal knowledge of contemporary Russian and the ability to discuss the most important issues of the Russian society. These will include Russian political challenges, socio-economic development, demographic and health problems, everyday life, religion and art.

Text

All course material will be provided by the instructor before the assignments in advance.

Requirements and Grading

Writing essays on topics given by the instructor—double spaced 12 font typed essays (for graduate students—2 pages long, for the undergraduates—1 page long.

Oral assignments allowing discussion in class time—once a week.

By the end of the semester, students will give one final oral paper on a topic chosen by a student and approved by the instructor.

Take home written essays—60% of the final grade.

Participation and discussion in the class—20%.

Final oral presentation 20%.

Prerequisite:

Three years of advanced level Russian courses.

Fall 2011 RUS 326/REE 385/RUS 380C

Course description: This course is designed to teach advanced writing and oral communication skills in the Russian language based on both traditional approach to grammatical and lexical studies of the language and innovative use of current Russian media, including newspaper and magazine articles, news programs, DVD clips and short films. The goal of the course is to help students learn how to master both formal and informal knowledge of contemporary Russian and ability to discuss the most important issues of the Russian society. These will include Russian current political issues, socio-economic development, demographic and health problems, ecological challenges, and everyday life.

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