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Kit Belgum, Chair 2505 University Avenue, Burdine Hall 336, Mailcode C3300, Austin TX 78712-1802 • 512-471-4123

John Hoberman

Professor Ph.D. Scandinavian Languages and Literature, University of California, Berkeley

John Hoberman

Contact

Biography

John Hoberman's books include Sport and Political Ideology (1984), The Olympic Crisis: Sport, Politics, and the Moral Order (1986), Mortal Engines: The Science of Performance and the Dehumanization of Sport (1992), Darwin's Athletes: How Sport Has Damaged Black America and Preserved the Myth of Race (1997), and Testosterone Dreams:  Rejuvenation, Aphrodesia, Doping (2005). He has published almost a hundred sports commentaries in American newspapers and magazines and in Der Spiegel.

Interests

European cultural and intellectual history with special interests in Sportwissenschaft and the history of ideas about race

GSD 311D • Race/Gndr Stereotype In Ger

37470 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm GEA 114
(also listed as EUS 306 )
show description

INTRODUCTION

During the nineteenth century, important scientific developments promoted a popular theory of “race.” Perhaps the most famous are Darwin’s theories, which paved the way for the development of physical anthropology, Social Darwinism and scientific speculations about biological traits that supposedly characterized the various “races.” Biological typing of human beings became a standard procedure for establishing physical and psychological “differences” between human populations – the precursor to today’s racial profiling. The history of these ideas provides us with a way to understand how pseudo-scientific “racial” representations of vulnerable minorities in popular literature and mass media, during the nineteenth century and up to the present day. have influenced the lives of millions of people and shaped our own thinking about “racial” difference. 

COURSE OBJECTIVES

This course is designed to meet four objectives: 

     1) to introduce you to biological typing in the nineteenth century with particular attention given to German-speaking countries;

     2) to build skills in critical cultural literacy by analyzing how developments in science influenced other domains; such as criminology (Lombroso), film (“M”), mental illness (Nordau), and gender and racial repression;

     3) to encourage you to consider the legacy of biological typing and its implications for contemporary society; and

     4) to assist you in refining your writing skills. 

 

REQUIRED TEXTS:      Samples from the course packet:

Charles Darwin, “The Evidence of the Descent of Man from Some Lower Form,” in The

Descent of Man [1871] (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1981): 9-33.

 

George W. Stocking, Jr., “The Dark-Skinned Savage: The Image of Primitive Man in

Evolutionary Anthropology,” in Race, Culture, and Evolution: Essays in the History of

Anthropology (1968): 110-132.

 

John Hoberman, “Darwin’s Athletes,” in Mortal Engines: The Science of Performance

and the Dehumanization of Sport (1992): 33-61.

 

Elaine Showalter, “Dr. Jekyll’s Closet,” in Sexual Anarchy: Gender and Culture at the

Fin-de-Siècle (1990): 105-126.

 

Edgar Rice Burroughs, Tarzan of the Apes (1914): 15-50.

 

Stephen J. Gould, “The ape in some of us: criminal anthropology,” in The Mismeasure of

Man (New York: W.W. Norton & Company, 1981): 122-145.

 

Daniel M. Vyleta, “Jewish Criminals,” in Crime, Jews and News: Vienna 1895-1914

(New York and Oxford: Berghahn Books, 2007): 40-69.

 

Ronald R. Thomas, “The Fingerprint of the Foreigner: Colonizing the Criminal Body in

1890s Detective Fiction and Criminal Anthropology.” English Literary History 61

(1994): 655-83.

 

Jonathan Marks, “The Eugenics Movement,” in Human Biodiversity: Genes, Race, and

History (1995): 77-97.

 

Hermann Eich, “The Germans Are … or Are They?” in The Germans [1963] (New York:

Stein and Day, 1980): 33-89.

 

ASSIGNMENTS AND GRADING (See Guidelines and Grading for Assignments section)

40%     Homework Assignments and Quizzes (in-class quizzes on homework assignments; worksheets to accompany assigned readings and prepare for class discussions)

20%    In-class examinations.

40 %    Critical Review Papers (5 papers, each 2-3 pp). 

GSD 341D • Socl Dramas Of Henrik Ibsen

37475 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm GEA 114
(also listed as C L 323, CTI 345, E 322, EUS 347, WGS 345 )
show description

Description:

This course offers a detailed introduction to Ibsen's social dramas (1877-1899), emphasizing their unity as a prolonged commentary on the society of his era and the variety of its human problems. Eight of the twelve plays are read in chronological order so as to show how each play stands in relation to those which precede or follow. Particular attention is paid to how Ibsen interprets basic human situations in different ways in different plays. Ibsen's patterned use of certain Norwegian words to create thematic ties between specific plays and characters is explored. The course pays special attention to the following topics: (1) the family, the home, the sphere of private life and their relationship to the public world of reputation, work, and citizenship; (2) the predicaments and choices of men and women in a male-dominated society; (3) Ibsen's interest in biological themes such as health, sickness, and heredity; (4) the origins and risks of various kinds of human creativity; and (5) the motives of interventions into the lives of others.

Texts/Readings:

Haugen, Einar. Ibsen's Drama: Author to Audience, Univ. of Minnesota Press

Ibsen (Rolf Fjelde,trans.) The Complete Major Prose Plays, NAL

Additional critical essays will be distributed in photocopied form.

Grading/Requirements:

This course is designed to satisfy the University's writing component requirement. Students will write two papers between eight and ten pages in length with preliminary discussion of outlines and limited rewriting. There will also be a final examination and occasional quizzes.

GER 382M • Sports In Germany: Cul/Pol Dim

38275 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm BUR 232
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Sport in Germany: Cultural and Political Dimensions

"Sport in Germany: Cultural and Political Dimensions" examines the sociocultural and political roles physical culture [Korperkultur] and sport [Sport] have played in German society over the past two centuries. Nascent German sportive nationalism begins during the early 19th century with the anti-Napoleonic movement of Friedrich Ludwig ("Turnvater") Jahn. Toward the end of the 19th century the cultural conservatism of the gymnastics movement [Turnbewegung] inspired by Jahn enters into a “cultural struggle” [Kulturkampf] against a foreign (English) sport culture that the gymnasts will eventually lose, viz. the global triumph of the competitive sports and cosmopolitan ideology of an Olympic movement of French origin. A sign of things to come is the fact that the pioneering sports medicine of the early 20th century, building on decades of German leadership in the biological sciences, is primarily German. The competition between xenophobic and cosmopolitan German attitudes emerges again before and during the 1936 Berlin Olympic Games and is resolved pragmatically (and successfully) by the Nazi regime, which wins the medals competition and achieves foreign policy goals in the process. Postwar Germany (East and West) will adopt high-performance sport [Hochleistungssport] as "a national priority," as Interior Minister Manfred Kanther phrased it many years after the establishment of the BRD and DDR. The postwar period produces unique collaborations linking the political, academic, and sports establishments on behalf of German sportive nationalism in both West and East Germany. The SED dictatorship proved to be more determined, resourceful, unscrupulous, and successful than its West German competitors. Recent German scholarship has demonstrated, however, that doping ambitions in West Germany were comparable to (if less extensive and

effective than) those of the East German sports bureaucrats led by Manfred Ewald. In recent decades the political and cultural significance of German sportive nationalism has persisted and is evident in Germany's long and successful campaign to become a world football power. Along another political axis, the 2006 football World Cup competition in Germany produced a politically acceptable version of German sportive nationalism in partnership with an impressive demonstration of a modernized German cosmopolitanism that put to rest the lingering nightmares produced by the German Olympiads of 1936 and 1972. The course also looks at sports commentaries by prominent German intellectuals such as Peter Schneider ("Die deutsche Lähmung” [The German Paralysis], 2004), Peter Sloterdijk ("Ein Team von Hermaphroditen," 2006), and various essays by other authors.

Class format/ method of instruction: The class will be conducted in a primarily discussion/secondarily lecture format. The course will be conducted in English. Course readings can be done: (1) in German and English OR (2) entirely in English.  The course will be of greatest interest to students in Germanic Studies, History, and Sports Studies.

 

Course Objectives

The principal objective of the course is to show graduate students how to find and analyze substantial aspects of German social, cultural, and political history within the history of the pre-modem physical culture movement of the 19th century and the modem sport culture of the 20th century and beyond. A second objective is to point out to graduate students significant connections that link the modem sports culture to German racial ideologies, such as those of the German nudist movement [der deutsche Naturismus] and the Nazi party [NSDAP], and to an enduring modern nationalism that welcomes forms of sportive self-assertion in addition to economic and military expressions of national viability and willpower.

 

Grading

Two short essays (25% each) and a long essay (50%).

The seminar will be conducted in English and German, with materials available in (mostly) German and English.

GRC 301 • Bad Blood

38595 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm JES A217A
(also listed as EUS 306 )
show description

INTRODUCTION

During the nineteenth century, important scientific developments promoted a popular theory of “race.” Perhaps the most famous are Darwin’s theories, which paved the way for the development of physical anthropology, Social Darwinism and scientific speculations about biological traits that supposedly characterized the various “races.” Biological typing of human beings became a standard procedure for establishing physical and psychological “differences” between human populations – the precursor to today’s racial profiling. The history of these ideas provides us with a way to understand how pseudo-scientific “racial” representations of vulnerable minorities in popular literature and mass media, during the nineteenth century and up to the present day. have influenced the lives of millions of people and shaped our own thinking about “racial” difference.

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES

This course is designed to meet four objectives: 

     1) to introduce you to biological typing in the nineteenth century with particular attention given to German-speaking countries;

     2) to build skills in critical cultural literacy by analyzing how developments in science influenced other domains; such as criminology (Lombroso), film (“M”), mental illness (Nordau), and gender and racial repression;

     3) to encourage you to consider the legacy of biological typing and its implications for contemporary society; and

     4) to assist you in refining your writing skills.  

SCA 323 • Socl Dramas Of Henrik Ibsen

38740 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm GEA 114
(also listed as C L 323, E 322, EUS 347 )
show description

Description:

This course offers a detailed introduction to Ibsen's social dramas (1877-1899), emphasizing their unity as a prolonged commentary on the society of his era and the variety of its human problems. Eight of the twelve plays are read in chronological order so as to show how each play stands in relation to those which precede or follow. Particular attention is paid to how Ibsen interprets basic human situations in different ways in different plays. Ibsen's patterned use of certain Norwegian words to create thematic ties between specific plays and characters is explored. The course pays special attention to the following topics: (1) the family, the home, the sphere of private life and their relationship to the public world of reputation, work, and citizenship; (2) the predicaments and choices of men and women in a male-dominated society; (3) Ibsen's interest in biological themes such as health, sickness, and heredity; (4) the origins and risks of various kinds of human creativity; and (5) the motives of interventions into the lives of others

Prerequisites: Upper-division standing.

SCA 335 • Scandinavia And Globalization

38830 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm BUR 337
(also listed as EUS 346 )
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Description:

Globalization, the greatest project in human history, is an historical process that encompasses worldwide cultural and economic integration. This new global order is characterized by multinational corporations and an increasingly free flow of capital and labor across the world, internationalizing the products, services, careers, travel opportunities, and mass media programming that are now available to people everywhere. All countries must now adapt to changing economies and the cultural trends transnational markets carry around the world. Cultural globalization has been driven largely by American influences -- popular music, television programming, and Hollywood films -- along with the sheer power of the English language to insinuate itself into virtually all aspects of modern experience. 

Scandinavia consists of five small countries (Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, Iceland) which, like nations everywhere, must adapt to the merciless competition of globalization by innovating and drawing upon their own social, cultural, and natural resources. In fact, Scandinavia is a conspicuously prosperous and peaceful region that has developed the most effective welfare state models in the world. This is one reason why Scandinavian societies have met the challenges of globalization and labor competition from low-wage countries so effectively. At the same time, these very small countries are vulnerable to various globalization pressures such as military threats, world economic instability, European Union policies, the charismatic influence of American popular culture, U.S.- based social media platforms, and the power of the English language to infiltrate small languages and even threaten their eventual extinction.

Yet these small Scandinavian countries also have ways of asserting themselves, via diplomatic initiatives, displays of moral leadership, the exporting of cultural products (especially films), and the production of medal-winning athletes and chess champions (Magnus Carlsen of Norway). In summary, this course examines how the small Scandinavian countries have coped with political and cultural vulnerability while cultivating the components of national identity that sustain small populations through traumatic national experiences as severe as military occupation and as intractable as peacetime economic competition with much more powerful economies and cultural products. 

Selected Texts:

Manfred Steger: Globalization: A Very Short Introduction (Oxford, 2009)

"Can the Scandinavian Model Adapt to Globalization?" (Scandinavian Studies, 2004)

Christine Ingebritsen, "Ecological Institutionalism: Scandinavia and the Greening of Global Capitalism" (Scandinavian Studies, 2012)

Hans Hognestad, "Transglobal Scandinavian? Globalization and the contestation of identities in football" (Soccer & Society, 2009)

Grading/Requirements:

Examination #1      20%

Examination #2      20%

4-page Paper         20%

Term Paper             40%

SCA 323 • Socl Dramas Of Henrik Ibsen

38290 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm GEA 114
(also listed as E 322, EUS 347, WGS 345 )
show description

Description:

This course offers a detailed introduction to Ibsen's social dramas (1877-1899), emphasizing their unity as a prolonged commentary on the society of his era and the variety of its human problems. Eight of the twelve plays are read in chronological order so as to show how each play stands in relation to those which precede or follow. Particular attention is paid to how Ibsen interprets basic human situations in different ways in different plays. Ibsen's patterned use of certain Norwegian words to create thematic ties between specific plays and characters is explored. The course pays special attention to the following topics: (1) the family, the home, the sphere of private life and their relationship to the public world of reputation, work, and citizenship; (2) the predicaments and choices of men and women in a male-dominated society; (3) Ibsen's interest in biological themes such as health, sickness, and heredity; (4) the origins and risks of various kinds of human creativity; and (5) the motives of interventions into the lives of others

Prerequisites: Upper-division standing.

Texts:

Haugen, Einar.  Ibsen's Drama: Author to Audience, University of Minnesota Press; Ibsen (Rolf Fjelde,trans.); The Complete Major Prose Plays, NAL; Additional critical essays will be distributed in photocopied form.

Requirements & Grading:

Students will write three papers between six and eight pages in length, one of which may be substantially revised (60%). There will also be a final examination and occasional quizzes (40%).

 

GRC 301 • Bad Blood

38195 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 930am-1100am MEZ 2.124
(also listed as EUS 306 )
show description

INTRODUCTION

During the nineteenth century, important scientific developments promoted a popular theory of “race.” Perhaps the most famous are Darwin’s theories, which paved the way for the development of physical anthropology, Social Darwinism and scientific speculations about biological traits that supposedly characterized the various “races.” Biological typing of human beings became a standard procedure for establishing physical and psychological “differences” between human populations – the precursor to today’s racial profiling. The history of these ideas provides us with a way to understand how pseudo-scientific “racial” representations of vulnerable minorities in popular literature and mass media, during the nineteenth century and up to the present day. have influenced the lives of millions of people and shaped our own thinking about “racial” difference.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

This course is designed to meet four objectives:

      1) to introduce you to biological typing in the nineteenth century with particular attention given to German-speaking countries;

      2) to build skills in critical cultural literacy by analyzing how developments in science influenced other domains; such as criminology (Lombroso), film (“M”), mental illness (Nordau), and gender and racial repression;

      3) to encourage you to consider the legacy of biological typing and its implications for contemporary society; and

      4) to assist you in refining your writing skills. 

REQUIRED TEXTS:

1. Course Packet available at Jenn’s Copy (approx. $45),2200 Guadalupe St (Lower Level), 473-8669.

2. Films on reserve at the Flawn Academic Center (FAC, formerly UGL)

ASSIGNMENTS AND GRADING (See Guidelines and Grading for Assignments section)

40%    Homework Assignments and Quizzes (in-class quizzes on homework assignments; worksheets to accompany assigned readings and prepare for class discussions)

20%    In-class examinations.

40 %    Critical Review Papers (5 papers, each 2-3 pp). 

Final grades will be assigned based on the traditional scale:A = 90-100%; B = 80-89%; C = 70-79%; D = 60-69%; F = 0-59%

NOR 612 • Accelerated Second-Year Nor

38460 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 1100am-100pm BUR 234
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Course Description:

Third and fourth semester Norwegian in which the students read copiously from a variety of texts, solidify their knowledge of Norwegian grammar and discuss the readings in Norwegian. The reading materials present a broad cross-section of Norwegian culture both past and present. Writing in Norwegian is also stressed.

Grading Policy:

Exams 50%.

Homework 30%.

Class Participation 20%.

Texts:

O'Leary and Shackelford. Norsk i sammenheng: Intrmediate Norwegian. (textbook). O’Leary and Shackelford. Norsk i sammenheng: Intermediate Norwegian (arbeidsbok).

SCA 323 • Socl Dramas Of Henrik Ibsen

38145 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm GEA 114
(also listed as C L 323, E 322, EUS 347, WGS 345 )
show description

Description:
This course offers a detailed introduction to Ibsen's social dramas (1877-1899), emphasizing their unity as a prolonged commentary on the society of his era and the variety of its human problems. Eight of the twelve plays are read in chronological order so as to show how each play stands in relation to those which precede or follow. Particular attention is paid to how Ibsen interprets basic human situations in different ways in different plays. Ibsen's patterned use of certain Norwegian words to create thematic ties between specific plays and characters is explored. The course pays special attention to the following topics: (1) the family, the home, the sphere of private life and their relationship to the public world of reputation, work, and citizenship; (2) the predicaments and choices of men and women in a male-dominated society; (3) Ibsen's interest in biological themes such as health, sickness, and heredity; (4) the origins and risks of various kinds of human creativity; and (5) the motives of interventions into the lives of others.

Possible Texts/Readings:
Haugen, Einar. Ibsen's Drama: Author to Audience, Univ. of Minnesota Press
Ibsen (Rolf Fjelde,trans.) The Complete Major Prose Plays, NAL
Additional critical essays will be distributed in photocopied form.

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