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Robert G. Moser, Chair BAT 2.116, Mailcode A1800, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-5121

Bartholomew Sparrow

Professor Ph.D., University of Chicago

Bartholomew Sparrow

Contact

Biography

Professor Sparrow studies American political development and, in particular, the conjunction between the American state and the international system. He teaches courses on American territorial expansion, American political institutions and processes (grad), American politics and government (intro), political communication, and the politics of food in America. He has received fellowships from the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, the Joan Shorenstein Center on the Press, Politics and Public Policy at Harvard University, and Harry S. Truman Presidential Library, and has been awarded the Leonard D. White and the Franklin L. Burdette/Pi Sigma Alpha awards from the American Political Science Association.

Professor Sparrow is currently completing a biography of Gen. Brent Scowcroft, the former U.S. National Security Advisor. Sparrow is the author of The Insular Cases and the Emergence of American Empire; Uncertain Guardians: The News Media as a Political Institution; and From the Outside In: World War II and the American State. He is co-editor, with Sanford Levinson, of The Louisiana Purchase and American Expansion, 1803-1898 and, with Roderick Hart, of Politics, Discourse, and American Society: New Agendas. He also has chapters in other edited volumes, and his articles have appeared in the American Political Science Review, Political Communication, Diplomatic History, the International Journal of Public Opinion Research, and other scholarly journals.

GOV 370L • Politics Of Food In America

39011 • Fall 2014
Meets MW 430pm-600pm CLA 0.112
show description

 

I. Course Description

This course examines the fundamentally political nature of food policy in the United States. It addresses the political economy of agricultural practices in the United States and of American food consumption (broadly interpreted to include food supplements and beverages).  It considers the political history of the production and regulation of food, ranging from the colonial era up to the present. It looks at food policy as it impacts public health—e.g., obesity, schoolchild nutrition.  It looks at the rules and customs of agricultural trade (including “fair trade”).  And it inquires into the ethics and moral aspects of how food is grown, processed, regulated, and consumed in the United States.

Food policy encompasses the whole of the political system: from the individual behavior of farmers and ranchers, to the group actions of companies, trade associations, commercial scientists, and food industry lobbyists, to the three institutions of government—the US Congress, the executive branch (Presidential leadership as well as the USDA, FDA, FTC, etc.), and the courts—to the global system of trade, energy, pollution, and climate change, and to restaurants, cafeterias, institutional food services, and consumers in their kitchens.

Lectures, in-class discussions, and in-class exercises will be supplemented by guest lectures and films.  News stories, relevant weblinks, and course-related comments will be posted on the course’s UT Blackboard website (BB).

Students must have 6 hours of government classes.

 

II: Materials

Required texts:

            • Eric Schlosser, Fast Food Nation, Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 2001.

• Paul Roberts, The End of Food, Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 2008.

• Timothy Pachirat, Every Twelve Seconds, New Haven: Yale University Press, 2011

• Other readings (“P” in the course schedule) will be available in a course packet at IT Copy, 512 West MLK, ph. 476-6662; itcopy@austin.rr.com

 

IV.  Grades:

Grades consist of the aggregate and weighted grades of tests (midterm, take-home final); quizzes; class exercises; class participation/attendance; and other assignments.

 

A. Tests (midterm and final)                            45%

The midterm test is worth 20 percent; the final take-home essay 25 percent of the course grade.  Tests must be taken and handed in when they are due; late tests will not be accepted.  Only hard copies are accepted; emailed copies or disk copies are not accepted.

 

B. Food Log and Analysis Paper                      25%

You must keep a food log for a 48-hour period (beginning on March 22, give or take a day, your choice), in which your keep track of what you ate and when.  You also need to trace down all the ingredients of what you eat for one of the days, describing where the food and its ingredients are from.  You are to then write a brief analysis of your experience and what patterns you found from keeping the journal.  The paper is to be no longer than 2500 words.

 

C. Quizzes                                                          15%

        There are four quizzes given over the semester.  Each quiz will review basic facts contained in the readings and lectures (including guest lectures and movie); each quiz (with the lowest score dropped) counts as 5% of your grade.

 

E. Class participation and attendance             10%

You are evaluated on your participation in the class.  You will be assessed on your engagement in the lectures and guest lectures, and in the questions and comments you contribute on the class’s BB discussion site.  You will receive a grade bonus if you miss on only two days or fewer (2 points added to your overall grade).  Failure to participate in class or to attend regularly, or misconduct (see under Rules below) will detract from your grade.

 

F.  Film review                                                     5%

You are to write a short summary of a film about the American food system or the global food system, and then analyze/interpret/criticize the documentary.  You may choose the film, as long as you check with your instructor.  The review should be no more than 1500 words in length.

 

G. Extra Credit                                                  up to 5%

You may take a field trip to a CSA, farmers’ market, or other local site, and write a short description and analysis of the visit (no more than 1500 words)

GOV 379S • Politics In Fiction

39034 • Fall 2014
Meets MW 300pm-430pm PAR 210
(also listed as LAH 350 )
show description

What is at stake in politics and government?  Why do political events unfold as they do?  Why do politicians and public officials make the choices they do?  Theories of politics and government, statistical analyses, and archival research take us so far.  Many say that the best way to capture politics and government—and especially the personal and emotional nature of politics—is through fiction.

 In “Politics and Fiction” students read some of the best fiction writing extant on American politics and government.  The reading list is based on the quality of the texts, rather than on focusing particular authors, addressing particular subjects, or covering particular time periods.  Fortunately, particular topics and time periods do come into play.  The books’ subjects range from accounts of 19th century America, to works on Vietnam and the 1960s, to novels about city and state and national politics and elections, and to contemporary lobbying and radicalism.

 Students are asked to read critically, that is to uncover the assumptions of and perspectives of each text with respect to ideology and partisanship, to consider how politics function and the political system operates, to think about the role played by individual and social psychology, and to assess what the relevant institutions are each case.  What are the political foundations and philosophic premises of the texts?  What is the author’s writing style and the effect of that style on the reader’s understanding of the text?

19th Century

Harriet Beecher Stowe, Uncle Tom’s Cabin, IBSN: 1840224023

Gore Vidal, Lincoln, IBSN: 0375708763

Mark Twain and Charles Dudley Warren, The Gilded Age.  ISBN: 0452009995

Vietnam and the 1960s

Graham Greene, The Quiet American ISBN: 0140185003

Don DeLillo, Libra ISBN: 014015604

Philip Roth, American Pastoral ISBN: 0375701429

Tim O'Brien, In the Lake of the Woods ISBN: 0140250947

 Local and State Politics

Robert Penn Warren, All the King’s Men ISBN:0156031043

Edwin O’Connor, The Last Hurrah ISBN: 0316626597*

Billy Lee Brammer, The Gay Place  ISBN:0292708319

 Contemporary Issues

Christopher Buckley, Thank you for Smoking  ISBN: 0812976525

David Goodwillie, American Subversive  ISBN: 1439157065

Students are responsible for composing (2) books reviews, making an in-class presentation, participating in class discussion, and writing short response papers.   

Students need to have taken Government 310L and 312L

 Grades

Book Reviews, two (1500-2000 words): 2 x 15 = 30 percent

Comment Papers, six (500 words maximum): 6 x 5 = 30 percent

Class Participation, including attendance: 30 percent

Presentation/Discussion leadership: 10 percent

GOV 370L • Us As Territorial Nation

39375 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm CLA 0.120
show description

I. Course Description

“The United States as a Territorial Nation” focuses on the territorial or the geographic dimension of the United States’ political development and explores how the United States became a continent-wide republic and, later, an overseas power.  It examines this development from the perspective of federalism.  The United States was founded on federal principles and then expanded as a federal union to include more inhabitants and areas as part of the “United States.” Yet from before the founding up to the early twentieth-first century, the United States has always included morethan its member states; it always had territories and possessions, a geopolitical reality defies the idea of United States as a merely a nation of states.  “The United States as a Territorial Nation” explores several themes accordingly: (1) the federalist philosophy behind the founding and the United States developed as a nation-state over time; (2) the interaction with an inclusion of other peoples within the United States, whether American Indians, Hispanics, Mormons, Chinese, or others; (3) the US government’s land acquisitions, the establishment of the “public domain”—land obtained by the U.S. government through peace settlements or purchases but not belonging to any one state—and the disposition (sale, gift, etc.) of this land; and (4) the origin of the United States “unincorporated” territories such as Puerto Rico and Guam, lying outside the continental United States, since prior to 1898 all territories eventually became member states of an expanding federal republic.

 

Students will play three political games during the semester.  Each game lasts about three and a half weeks in all—including set up and debriefing—and is played both in class and on your own time.  The games, which are closely based on actual history, involve placing each student in a particular role and encourage him/her to engage with other student-players to achieve your own game-role objectives.  Each game requires that the student read specific background materials to orient himself/herself to the key ideas, principal dynamics, and important details of the particular situation the game revolves around.  Mastery of these ideas, dynamics, and details is critical to success in the games.

In the first game, “Forest Diplomacy: War and Peace on the Colonial Frontier” (“Game 1” or “G1”), students have to grapple with several crucial issues that confronted the Penn Colony in mid-1700s America.  The issues revolve around the Indians residing in the area, Anglo settlers desire for land, the pacifist Quakers and their delicate relationship with the colony’s rulers, and the British and the ruling Penn family.  The second game, “Red Clay, 1835: Cherokee Removal and the Meaning of Sovereignty” (“G2”), makes students consider the complex interactions among the Cherokee, the last of the “Five Civilized Tribes” remaining in George, considers US Supreme Court decisions, and reviews other founding documents factoring into the removal of the Indians from Georgia under President Andrew Jackson.  In the third game, “The Quincy Library Group, 1993: Forest Policy in the Sierra Nevada” (“G3”), students play the roles of citizens living in and around a small north-central California mountain town.  The local economy was in dire straits and the townspeople had to reckon with the changes in logging and timber-harvesting rules, the presence and practices of the U.S. Forest Service, endangered species, the threat of forest fires, and other environmental issues.

 

As a writing flag course, we will explicitly talk about writing, read each others’ work, and work on revising papers.  You will are responsible for four papers.  For the first paper, you will read each and criticize your fellow students’ papers and then revise them.  There will also be one paper (sometimes two shorter papers) affiliated with each game (three total).  As a course with a multicultural flag, students are exposed to the interactions of Euro-Americans and the aboriginal North American “Indians” and with the peoples of the United States’ overseas’ territories.

 

 

Texts:

 

Thurman Wilkins, Cherokee Tragedy: The Ridge Family and the Decimation of a People 2nd ed. (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1986).

 

Bartholomew H. Sparrow, The Insular Cases and the Emergence of American Empire (Kansas 2006).  IBSN: 978-0700614820

 

Three game packets; one course reading packet.

 

Requirements and Grades

 

Students are responsible for:

Quizzes:                                                                               4 x 6 pts = 24%

Take-home final                                                                    1 x 16 pts = 16%

Papers  (first paper and its revision)                                                         = 7%       

Class participation (game participation separate)                                       = 8%

Game performances  (written and verbal)                                 3 x 15 pts = 45%   

Flag: Writing; Cultural diversity.

GOV 379S • Politics In Fiction

39390 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm CLA 0.120
(also listed as LAH 350 )
show description

 Introduction

What is at stake in politics and government?  Why do political events unfold as they do?  Why do politicians and public officials make the choices they do?  Theories of politics and government, statistical analyses, and archival research take us so far.  Many say that the best way to capture politics and government—and especially the personal and emotional nature of politics—is through fiction.

 In “Politics and Fiction” students read some of the best fiction writing extant on American politics and government.  The reading list is based on the quality of the texts, rather than on focusing particular authors, addressing particular subjects, or covering particular time periods.  Fortunately, particular topics and time periods do come into play.  The books’ subjects range from accounts of 19th century America, to works on Vietnam and the 1960s, to novels about city and state and national politics and elections, and to contemporary lobbying and radicalism.

Students are asked to read critically, that is to uncover the assumptions of and perspectives of each text with respect to ideology and partisanship, to consider how politics function and the political system operates, to think about the role played by individual and social psychology, and to assess what the relevant institutions are each case.  What are the political foundations and philosophic premises of the texts?  What is the author’s writing style and the effect of that style on the reader’s understanding of the text?

  Requirements

Students are responsible for composing (2) books reviews, making an in-class presentation, participating in class discussion, and writing short response papers.  

Students need to have taken Government 310L and 312L

 Grades

Book Reviews, two (1500-2000 words): 2 x 15 = 30 percent

Comment Papers, six (500 words maximum): 6 x 5 = 30 percent

Class Participation, including attendance: 30 percent

Presentation/Discussion leadership: 10 percent

Texts (required)

19th Century

Harriet Beecher Stowe, Uncle Tom’s Cabin, IBSN: 1840224023

Gore Vidal, Lincoln, IBSN: 0375708763

Mark Twain and Charles Dudley Warren, The Gilded Age.  ISBN: 0452009995

Vietnam and the 1960s

Graham Greene, The Quiet American ISBN: 0140185003

Don DeLillo, Libra ISBN: 014015604

Philip Roth, American Pastoral ISBN: 0375701429

Tim O'Brien, In the Lake of the Woods ISBN: 0140250947

Local and State Politics

Robert Penn Warren, All the King’s Men ISBN:0156031043

Edwin O’Connor, The Last Hurrah ISBN: 0316626597*

Billy Lee Brammer, The Gay Place  ISBN:0292708319

Contemporary Issues

Christopher Buckley, Thank you for Smoking  ISBN: 0812976525

David Goodwillie, American Subversive  ISBN: 1439157065

GOV 370L • Politics Of Food In America

39305 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm PAR 203
show description

Course Description

This course examines the fundamentally political nature of food policy in the United States. It addresses the political economy of agricultural practices in the United States and of American food consumption (broadly interpreted to include food supplements and beverages).  It considers the political history of the production and regulation of food, ranging from the colonial era up to the present. It looks at food policy as it impacts public health—e.g., obesity, schoolchild nutrition.  It looks at the rules and customs of agricultural trade (including “fair trade”).  And it inquires into the ethics and moral aspects of how food is grown, processed, regulated, and consumed in the United States.

Food policy encompasses the whole of the political system: from the individual behavior of farmers and ranchers, to the group actions of companies, trade associations, commercial scientists, and food industry lobbyists, to the three institutions of government—the US Congress, the executive branch (Presidential leadership as well as the USDA, FDA, FTC, etc.), and the courts—to the global system of trade, energy, pollution, and climate change, and to restaurants, cafeterias, institutional food services, and consumers in their kitchens.

Lectures, in-class discussions, and in-class exercises will be supplemented by guest lectures and films.  News stories, relevant weblinks, and course-related comments will be posted on the course’s UT Blackboard website (BB).

Students must have 6 hours of government classes.

 

 

Texts

• Eric Schlosser, Fast Food Nation, Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 2001.

• Paul Roberts, The End of Food, Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 2008.

• Timothy Pachirat, Every Twelve Seconds, New Haven: Yale University Press, 2011

• Other readings (“P” in the course schedule) will be available in a course packet at IT Copy, 512 West MLK, ph. 476-6662; itcopy@austin.rr.com

 

 

Grading Policy

Grades consist of the aggregate and weighted grades of tests (midterm, take-home final); quizzes; class exercises; class participation/attendance; and other assignments.

 

A. Tests (midterm and final)                            45%

The midterm test is worth 20 percent; the final take-home essay 25 percent of the course grade.  Tests must be taken and handed in when they are due; late tests will not be accepted.  Only hard copies are accepted; emailed copies or disk copies are not accepted.

 

B. Food Log and Analysis Paper                      25%

You must keep a food log for a 48-hour period (beginning on March 22, give or take a day, your choice), in which your keep track of what you ate and when.  You also need to trace down all the ingredients of what you eat for one of the days, describing where the food and its ingredients are from.  You are to then write a brief analysis of your experience and what patterns you found from keeping the journal.  The paper is to be no longer than 2500 words.

 

C. Quizzes                                                          15%

        There are four quizzes given over the semester.  Each quiz will review basic facts contained in the readings and lectures (including guest lectures and movie); each quiz (with the lowest score dropped) counts as 5% of your grade.

 

E. Class participation and attendance             10%

You are evaluated on your participation in the class.  You will be assessed on your engagement in the lectures and guest lectures, and in the questions and comments you contribute on the class’s BB discussion site.  You will receive a grade bonus if you miss on only two days or fewer (2 points added to your overall grade).  Failure to participate in class or to attend regularly, or misconduct (see under Rules below) will detract from your grade.

 

F.  Film review                                                     5%

You are to write a short summary of a film about the American food system or the global food system, and then analyze/interpret/criticize the documentary.  You may choose the film, as long as you check with your instructor.  The review should be no more than 1500 words in length.

 

G. Extra Credit                                                  up to 5%

You may take a field trip to a CSA, farmers’ market, or other local site, and write a short description and analysis of the visit (no more than 1500 words)

 

GOV 370L • Us As Territorial Nation

39010 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am MEZ 2.122
show description

I. Course Description

“The United States as a Territorial Nation” explores how the United States became a continent-wide republic and, later, an overseas power.  It focuses on the territorial or the geographic dimension of the United States’ political development.  From before the founding up to the present, early twentieth-first century, the United States included more than just its member states: it always included territories and possessions; the geopolitical reality of United States defies the idea of the US as a simply a nation of states.

The course explores several aspects of this territoriality of US political development:          (1) the federalist philosophy behind the founding; (2) the US government’s large land acquisitions and its establishment of the “public domain”—land obtained by the U.S. government through peace settlements or purchases but not belonging to any of the states; (3) the formation of separate territorial governments, and the transition of territories to states within the union; (4) how U.S. expansion affected the diverse population of American Indians, Hispanics, Mormons, Chinese, and other peoples; (5) the history of U.S. land policy, leading to the transfer of land from the public domain and from within the states to several different U.S. government departments and agencies; (6) the origin of the United States “unincorporated” territories such as Puerto Rico and Guam, lying outside the continental United States.

Students will play two political games during the semester, one early in the term, the other after the mid-semester break.  Each game lasts about three weeks total (including set up and debriefing) and is played both in class and on your own time. The games involve placing you in particular roles in actual historical situations and encourage you to engage with other student-players to achieve your particular objectives.  Each game requires that you read specific background materials to orient yourself to the key ideas, principal dynamics, and important details of the particular situation that the game revolves around.  Mastery of these ideas, dynamics, and details is critical to your success in the games.

In the first game, “Forest Diplomacy: War and Peace on the Colonial Frontier” (“G1”), students have to grapple with several crucial issues that confronted the Penn Colony in mid-1700s America.  The issues revolve around the Indians residing in the area, Anglo settlers desire for land, the pacifist Quakers and their delicate relationship with the colony’s rulers, and the British, who were in alliance with the ruling Penn family.  In the second game, “The Quincy Library Group, 1993: Forest Policy in the Sierra Nevada” (“G2”), students play the roles of citizens living in and around a small north-central California mountain town.  The local economy was in dire straits and the townspeople had to reckon with the changes in logging and timber-harvesting rules, the presence and practices of the U.S. Forest Service, endangered species, the threat of forest fires, and other environmental issues.

As a writing flag course, we will explicitly talk about writing, read each others’ work, and work on revising papers.  You will are responsible for four papers. For the first and third papers, you will read each and criticize your fellow students’ papers and then be able to revise them.  There will also be one paper affiliated with each game.

Students need to have taken Government 310L and 312L.

 

II. Textbooks and Reading Packet

Patricia Nelson Limerick, The Legacy of Conquest: The Unbroken Past of the American West (Norton 1988).  IBSN: 978-0393304978

Bartholomew H. Sparrow, The Insular Cases and the Emergence of American Empire (Kansas 2006).  IBSN: 978-0700614820

 

All other readings are in a required course packet available at IT Copy, 512 West MLK, Austin, 78701, ph. 476-6662; itcopy@austin.rr.com

 

 

III.  Course Goals

A.  By taking “The United States as a Territorial Nation” you are expected to be able to:

•  integrate the major contours of the history of the geographic expansion of the United States into the constitutional principles of the United States

• learn the several distinct phases of U.S. expansion

• recall the several causes and dynamics of territorial growth

• know the basic history and essential politics of the US public lands

• explain why U.S. geographic expansion ultimately stopped

• identify and explain the presence of the current U.S. territories

• increase your familiarity with the variety and richness of the American cultural experience.  Accordingly, this course carries the flag for Cultural Diversity in the United States. A substantial portion of your grade will come from assignments covering the practices, beliefs, and histories of at least cultural groups that have been out of the mainstream of American life.

 

B. As a writing flag course, you are asked to:

• write concise, organized, fluid, and fact-based arguments

• summarize readings, evaluate arguments, and/or propose your own ideas in your writing

• submit polished, “clean” writing to your instructor

• complete several distinct writing assignments over the semester

 

C.  By playing the political simulation games, you are expected to be able to:

• adopt roles and positions at odds with your own experience

• internalize your new role and represent that new, adopted role in your speech and writing while playing the game

• interact and engage with your colleagues in pursuit of the objectives you are assigned in your role for that game

• exercise leadership, independence of thought, and other qualities according to your game role

 

D.  As a student in the class, you are expected to demonstrate the following values:

• respect for your fellow students and teacher

• self-reflection and on-going assessment of your own learning

• honesty, responsibility, self-motivation, and hard work

• intellectual engagement in the policies, practices, and implications of U.S. geographical expansion

 

E.  Specific student assignments:

• reading the day’s assigned text(s) in advance of that day’s lecture and discussion

• participating in class discussion and course material (class participation and attendance)

• taking tests on readings and lectures (exams)

• playing the games (more instructions will follow)

• writing papers

• keeping up with the course’s BB site and your own email accounts

 

 

IVGrades:

Grades for this class are composed by the grades you receive in several distinct components.  First, there are three long quizzes, each worth 5 percent of the course grade.  Second, there is a take-home final, worth 15 percent of the course grade.  Tests, in all, therefore make up 35% of the total grade.  Secondly, your performance in the two games, which together amount to almost half the semester, will be worth 20 percent each (equaling 40% of the total grade).  The games have their own written assignments and these constitute most of the game grade (which are also composed of in-class performance, oral presentations, and other factors).  Thirdly, as a writing class, there are two other, separate writing assignments (two papers besides those associated with each game); the first paper is worth 5 percent of the grade, the third, 10 percent (15 percent of the total grade.)  Last, class participation and attendance is expected, per the class guidelines above.  Class participation—separate from the games—has two components and makes up another 15 percent of the grade.  You will make a brief presentation of the class readings for one class day and then lead off discussion with three questions (5%) and on the other class days are expected to participate in the class discussions (10%).

 

Tests (15% + 3 x 5)                 = 30%

            Games (2 x 20%)         = 40%

            Papers (5%+10%)        = 15%

            Participation (5%+10%) = 15%

 

The class uses plusses and minuses.  For Bs, for example, 80-82 is a B-, 83-86 is a B, and 87-89 is a B+.  The instructor may round up—but also reserves the right not to.

 

GOV 379S • Politics In Fiction

39030 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm GAR 2.124
(also listed as LAH 350 )
show description

What is at stake in politics and government?  Why do political events unfold as they do?  Why do politicians and public officials make the choices they do?  Theories of politics and government, statistical analyses, and archival research can only take us so far.  In fact, many say that the best way to capture politics and government—and especially the personal and emotional nature of politics—is through fiction. 

In “Politics and Fiction” students read some of the best fiction writing that exists on American politics and government.  The reading list is thus based on the quality of the text, rather than on focusing particular authors, addressing particular subjects, or covering particular time periods.  The books range from accounts of 19th century America, to works on Vietnam and the 1960s, to novels about city, state, and national politics and elections, and to treatments of contemporary lobbying and terrorism.  

Students will be asked to read critically so as to learn of the partisanship, psychology, and institutional dimensions of politics contained in the fiction they read.  But they will also be asked to question the political assumptions and philosophic premises of each book.  They will also be expected to consider the writing style employed by each author, and the effect that such style has.

Texts:

19th Century

Gore Vidal, Lincoln

Henry Adams, Democracy

Mark Twain and Charles Dudley Warren, The Gilded Age

Vietnam and the 1960s

Graham Greene, The Quiet American

Don DeLillo, Libra

Philip Roth, American Pastoral 

Tim O'Brien, In the Lake of the Woods

Local, State, and Federal Politics

Edwin O’Connor, The Last Hurrah

Robert Penn Warren, All the King’s Men

Billy Lee Brammer, The Gay Place

Garrett Epps, The Shad Treatment

Allen Drury, Advise and Consent

Michael Halberstam, The Wanting of Levine

Contemporary Issues

Christopher Buckley, Thank you for Smoking

David Goodwillie, American Subversive

Requirements

Students are responsible for composing books reviews, making in-class presentations, participating in discussions, and writing short reaction papers.

 

 

GOV 310L • American Government

38580 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm MEZ 1.306
show description

Course Description

 This course introduces you to the politics and government of the United States (a lot) and the state of Texas (some).  Among the issues we address are the following:

•  What is politics? 

•  What is democracy?

•  What is political science?

•  What ideas about the political system have been most relevant to understanding the United States as a representative democracy? 

•  What political processes and principal policies characterize the governments of the United States and of Texas, past and present?

•  What events, documents, and political realities lie behind the development of the United States from thirteen Atlantic colonies to its emergence as a superpower?

•  How do you, the citizen, fit into state and national politics and government?

The course concentrates on the political philosophy and political history of the United States and Texas.  It also takes a critical look at the institutions and processes of American and state government as they have developed up to the present.

Films and guest lectures will supplement course lectures.  Class attendance and participation is expected, and students may be called upon in class. The course is accompanied by a required text and a required course packet.  The packet contains documents from the founding, Supreme Court cases, the texts of U.S. treaties, readings from American political science, and other materials.

 

Grading Policy

Final grades will be determined in the following proportions.  Your instructor and teaching assistants may also factor in your improvement over the course of the semester and take into account how your grades are distributed among the several course components

1.Tests (3) - 65%

The first is worth 20 percent of your grade, the second is worth 20 percent, and the third is worth 25 percent of your grade. 

2.Class exercises (5) - 20%

You have five short assignments in which you have to learn about your congressional representative, U.S. senator, state representative (Texas, other), and state senator (Texas, other).  You will also have to write a brief report about an out-of-class assignment for which you are to visit the Texas State Capitol.

3.Quizzes (3) - 15%

        You are responsible for three quizzes on the assigned readings and lectures (5 percent each).   

4.Class participation - bonus up to 3%

In-class participation, such as questions, contributions to the Blackboard (BB) discussion site, and other indicators of interest and participation (speaking to your teaching assistants or instructor after class, in office hours, or by appointment) may be a tipping factor in the determination of overall grades.

 

 

Texts

American Government textbook (to be determined), course packet, and Texas Politics website.

GOV 381L • American Political Devel

38900 • Fall 2012
Meets W 330pm-630pm BAT 1.104
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Course Description

This is a research seminar on American Political Development.  The course will expose students to a number of topics related to the application of political science to American history.  Topics to be investigated include American Political Development as subfield, the state, the American South, Reconstruction, religion, industrialization, liberalism, immigration, gender, coercion, the spatial quality of US historical development, and the relationship between the United States and other states (and other international actors).   According, the seminar features a number of critically acclaimed works in the field of American political development, books and articles mostly dating from the 1990s and ‘00s.

The seminar will explicitly consider the comparative dimensions to institutional changes in US politics and government—or, conversely, on the United States as exceptional.  It will also focus on the qualitative methodologies used in APD, and focus on questions of levels of analysis and of evidence.

Students will be responsible for several reaction papers, for oral presentations, for a 15-25 page research paper OR a combination of a book review and a 24-hr. take-home exam at the end of the semester.  The research paper will consist of an article quality, original work on a topic chosen by the student in consultation with her or his instructor.  A proposal is due on the fifth week of class, and a draft of the paper is due on 13th week.   The book review, for students not choosing the research paper, consists of a review of a book not assigned in class and of the student’s own choice in consultation with her or his instructor.   The take-home final is designed to be a mock prelim exam for first and/or second year students.

 

Grading Policy 

Reaction papers 25 percent; oral presentation(s) and class participation 30 percent; research paper OR book review and take-home exam 45 percent.

 

Texts

Richard F. Bensel, The Political Economy of American Industrialization, 1877-1900 Cambridge University Press; 1 edition (November 6, 2000): 052177604X

John Gaventa, Power and Powerlessness: Quiescence and Rebellion in an Appalachian Valley (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1980): 0252007727

Marie Gottschalk, The Prison and the Gallows: The Politics of Mass Incarceration in America Cambridge University Press (June 19, 2006) ISBN: 0521682916

Ira Katznelson and Stephen Shefter, eds., Shaped by War and Trade (Princeton: Princeton U. P., 2002).  ISBN: 0691057044

James A. Morone, Hellfire Nation: The Politics of Sin in American History Yale University Press (February 8, 2003) ISBN: 0300105177

Suzanne Mettler, Dividing Citizens: Gender and Federalism in New Deal Public Policy Cornell University Press (June 11, 1998)  ISBN: 0801485460

Karen Orren and Stephen Skowronek, Search for American Political Development (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2004): ISBN: 0521547644

Paul Pierson, Politics in Time: History, Institutions, and Social Analysis (Princeton University Press; First Edition edition (August 9, 2004) ISBN:  0691117152

David Brian Robertson, The Constitution and America's Destiny (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2005); ISBN: 0521607787

Stephen Skowronek and Matthew Glassman, eds. Formative Acts: American Politics in the Making (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2007).  ISBN: 081224012X

Bartholomew Sparrow, From the Outside In: World War II and the American State.  Princeton: Princeton University Press (February 5, 1996): 069104404X

Bartholomew Sparrow, The Insular Cases and the Emergence of American Empire (Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 2006): ISBN: 0700614826

Daniel J. Tichenor, Dividing Lines: The Politics of Immigration Control in America (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2002).  ISBN: 0691088055

Richard M. Valelly, The Two Reconstructions: The Struggle for Black Enfranchisement. ISBN: 0226845303

GOV 370L • Politics Of Food In America

38835 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm WAG 420
show description

 

I. COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course examines the many aspects of food policy in the United States.  It therefore considers the behavior and motivations of individual and corporate producers, lobbyists, and members of Congress.  It investigates the role of the US president and executive branch, particularly the actions of, and regulation and implementation by the USDA, FDA, EPA, and other relevant government agencies.  It considers the role of the federal courts and some of the case law on food and agricultural issues.  It looks at the rules and customs of agricultural trade (including “fair trade”), and it inquires into the ethics and morality of how food is grown, processed, regulated, and consumed.  The course further addresses several related issues, specifically the origins and history of food production and consumption in the United States, the influence of social movements, such as those for the prohibition of alcohol, for organic food, and against genetically modified crops and animals.  It further considers the public health dimensions and the climactic implications of contemporary US food policy.  Lectures by your instructor will be supplemented by several guest lectures and films.

II: MATERIALS

Required texts (“T” in the course schedule below):

• Eric Schlosser, Fast Food Nation, Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 2001.

• Marion Nestle, Food Politics: How the Food Industry Influences Nutrition and Health, Berkeley: University of California Press, 2002.

• Peter Singer and Jim Mason, The Ethics of What We Eat: Why Our Food Choices Matter, Emmaus, Penn.: Rodale Press, 2006.

All other readings (“P” in the course schedule) are in the course packet required for this class available at IT Copy, 512 West MLK, Austin, 78701, ph. 476-6662; itcopy@austin.rr.com

News stories, weblinks, and comments may be posted on the course’s BB site.

III: COURSE GOALS

By taking “The Politics of Food in America” the student will be able to:

• discuss the major steps in the development of the U.S. food industry

• identify the legislative processes, lobbying, and litigation that have caused how food is produced, regulated, distributed, and consumed in the United States

• explain the role of the federal government in the food sector

• explain the effects of contemporary food policy on public problems such as obesity and climate change

• describe the role of genetic modification (GMs) in food production

• recognize the trade laws, global factors, and international organizations (such as the World Trade Organization, or WTO) that affect food in America

• become familiar with the ethics and/or philosophies explicit—or implicit—in food production and consumption    IV.  GRADES:

Grades consist of the aggregate, weighted grades of tests (midterm, take-home final); quizzes; class exercises; class participation/attendance; and other assignments.  The class uses plusses and minuses.  For a B, for example, 80-82 is a B-, 83-86 is a B, and 87-89 is a B+.  The same applies for all other grades except an A, which has no plus grade.  The instructor may round up, and also reserves the right not to.

A.     Tests (midterm, final)             45%

Midterm is 20 percent; final take-home essay is 25 percent.  Tests must be taken and handed in when they are due; late tests will not be accepted.  Only hard copies are accepted; emailed copies or disk copies are not accepted.

B.     Food Log and Analysis Paper          20%

You must keep a food log for a 48-hour period (beginning around March 30, your choice), keeping track of what you ate and when.  You also need to trace down all the ingredients of what you eat, for one of the days, and describe where the food and its ingredients are from.  You are to then write a brief analysis of your experience and what patterns you found from keeping the journal.  The paper is to be no longer than 2000 words.

C.     Quizzes                    15%

    There will be three quizzes held over the course of the semester.  Each quiz, reviewing the basic facts contained in the readings and lectures (including guest lectures and movie), counts as 5 percent of your grade.

E. Group Project                    10%

You and three classmates are to come up with a three-page document outlining your business plan, local, state, or federal legislation, or other ideas to grapple with the issues of food in America.  

E. Class participation                  5%

You are evaluated on your participation in the class.  You will be assessed on your engagement shown in class during lectures, guest lectures, and questions and comments posed by your fellow students, on your contributions to a Blackboard discussion site (to be set up for this class), and on other indicators of your interest and engagement in the course topic.  You will receive a grade bonus if you miss on only two days or fewer (2 points added to your overall grade).  Failure to participate in class or attend regularly (see above), or misconduct in class (see “General Rules,” above) will detract from your grade.

F.  Film review                      5%

You are to right a short summary and then analysis/interpretation of a film     about the American food system or about the global food system in relation to the United States.  You may choose the film, as long as you clear it with your instructor.  The review should be no more than 1500 words in length.

GOV 370L • Us As Territorial Nation

38865 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 800am-930am MEZ 1.204
show description

 

Course Description

“The United States as a Territorial Nation” explores how the United States became a continent-wide nation-state and, later, an overseas power.  It focuses on the territorial or geographic dimension of the United States’ political development.  Throughout the lengthy expansion period, from before the founding to the late twentieth century, the United included more than just its member states: it always included territories and possessions.  The geopolitical reality of United States therefore defies the simple idea of the United States as a nation of states.

The course explores several features of this territorial dimension of the United States’ political development: (1) the federalist philosophy behind the founding; (2) the U.S. government’s great land acquisitions and the establishment of the “public domain”—land obtained by the U.S. government through peace settlements or purchases but not belonging to any of the states; (3) the formation of separate territorial governments, and the transition of territories to states within the union; (4) how U.S. expansion affected the diverse population of American Indians, Hispanics, Mormons, Chinese, and other peoples; (5) the history of U.S. land policy, leading to the transfer of land from the public domain and from within the states to several different U.S. government departments and agencies; (6) the origin of the United States “unincorporated” territories such as Puerto Rico and Guam, gained after the Spanish-American War and lying outside the continental United States.

Students will play two political games during the semester, one early on, the other much later.   Each game lasts about three weeks total (including set up and debriefing) and is played in class and also on your own time. The games involve placing you in particular roles in actual historical situations, where you have to engage with other student-players to achieve your particular objectives.  Each game requires that you read specific background materials to orient yourself to the key ideas, principal dynamics, and important details of the particular situation that the game revolves around.  

In the first game, “Forest Diplomacy: War and Peace on the Colonial Frontier” (“G1”), students have to grapple with several crucial issues that confronted the Penn Colony in mid-1700s America.  The issues revolve around the Indians residing in the area, Anglo settlers desire for land, the pacifist Quakers and their delicate relationship with the colony’s rulers, and the British, who are in alliance with the ruling Penn family.

 In the second game, “The Quincy Library Group, 1993: Forest Policy in the Sierra Nevada” (“G2”), students play the roles of citizens living in and around a small north-central California mountain town.  The local economy is in dire straits and the townspeople have to reckon with the changes in logging and timber-harvesting rules, the presence and practices of the U.S. Forest Service, endangered species, the threat of forest fires, and other environmental issues.

As a writing class, students are responsible for four papers.  One with each game and two others.  For the first and third papers, you will read each and criticize your fellow students’ papers and then get a chance to revise them.

II. Textbooks and Reading Packet

Patricia Nelson Limerick, The Legacy of Conquest: The Unbroken Past of the American West (Norton 1988).

Bartholomew H. Sparrow, The Insular Cases and the Emergence of American Empire (Kansas 2006).

All other readings are in a required course packet (marked “P” in the course schedule below) available at IT Copy, 512 West MLK, Austin, 78701, ph. 476-6662; itcopy@austin.rr.com

IV.  GRADES:

Grades for this class are composed by the grades you receive in several distinct components.  First, there are three long quizzes, each worth 5 percent of the course grade.  Second, there is a take-home final, worth 20 percent of the course grade.  Tests, in all, therefore make up 35% of the total grade.  Secondly, your performance in the two games, which together amount to almost half the semester, will be worth 20 percent each (40% of the total grade).  The games have their own written assignments and these constitute most of the game grade (which are also composed of in-class performance, oral presentations, and other factors).  Thirdly, as a writing class, there are two other, separate writing assignments (two papers besides those associated with each game); the first paper is worth 5 percent of the grade, the third, 10 percent (15 percent of the total grade.)  Last, class participation and attendance is expected, per the class guidelines above.  And class participation—separate from the games—makes up another 10 percent of the grade.

    Tests (3 x 5% + 20%)     = 35%

    Games (2 x 20%)     = 40%

    Papers (5% + 10%)     = 15%

    Class Participation     = 10%

The class uses plusses and minuses.  For Bs, for example, 80-82 is a B-, 83-86 is a B, and 87-89 is a B+.  The instructor may round up—but also reserves the right not to.

GOV 310L • American Government

38570 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm CMA A2.320
show description

This course is an introduction to American government and politics.  While the main focus is on the national level, additional attention is paid to the state and local governments of Texas. Topics will include U.S. political history, political institutions, elections, public opinion, rights and freedoms, and public policy issues.

GOV 381J • Pol Institutions And Processes

38900 • Fall 2011
Meets T 330pm-630pm BAT 1.104
show description

Description from Fall 2010 - New description coming...

 

This seminar introduces graduate students to the study of American politics and government.   The course reviews both classic and more recent scholarship on issues in American political science.  The readings address a range of topics, from questions of democracy, the political system, and political culture, to ones of particular aspects of American politics, such as public opinion, partisanship, Congress, the presidency, and the judiciary.  Students read what political scientists have written (and argued) about the different topics related to political science on the United States.  Of special concern are the controversies within the discipline: where do political scientists disagree, and why?  What are the implications of how political scientists have worked as professionals?

GOV 370L • Politics Of Food In America

39050 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am WAG 420
show description

This course examines the political history, current practices, law, ethics, and philosophy of how food is grown, processed, regulated, and consumed in the United States.  The course addresses several key components of this topic: (1) the origins and history of food production and consumption in the United States; (2) the influence of social movements, such as those for the prohibition of alcohol, for organic food, and for GM-free food; (3) major legislation and regulatory changes regarding food and beverages; (4) the development of the food industry in the United States; (5) the regulation and administration of food and the production process, especially by the Department of Agriculture and the Food and Drug Administration; (6) the impact of trade and foreign actors in America’s food process; (7) the ethics of what we eat and how we grow and produce our food in the United States and worldwide.

GOV 370L • Us As Territorial Nation

39090 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm MEZ 2.102
show description

“The United States as a Territorial Nation” explores how the United States became a continental nation-state and, later, an overseas power.  It focuses on the territorial or geographic dimension of the United States’ political development.  Throughout the lengthy expansion period, from before the founding to the late twentieth century, the United included more than just its member states: it always included territories and possessions.  The geopolitical reality of United States therefore defies the simple idea of the United States as a nation of states. The course explores several features of this territorial dimension of the United States’ political development: (1) the federalist philosophy behind the founding; (2) the U.S. government’s several land acquisitions and the establishment of the “public domain”—land obtained by the U.S. government through peace settlements or purchases but not belonging to any of the states; (3) the formation of separate territorial governments, and the transition of territories to states within the union; (4) how U.S. expansion affected the diverse population of American Indians, Hispanics, Mormons, Chinese, and other peoples; (5) the history of U.S. land policy, leading to the transfer of land from the public domain and from within the states to several different U.S. government departments and agencies; (6) the origin of the United States “unincorporated” territories such as Puerto Rico and Guam, gained after the Spanish-American War and lying outside the continental United States.

GOV 310L • American Government

38395 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm ART 1.102
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Course Description:
This course introduces you to the politics and government of the United States (a lot) and the state of Texas (some):
•  What is politics?  
•  What ideas about politics and government have been most relevant to understanding the United States as a representative democracy?  
•  What events, documents, and political realities lie behind the development of the United States from thirteen states on the Atlantic coast to its emergence as a superpower?
•  What political processes and principal policies characterize the governments of the United States and of Texas at present?
•  What role do you, the citizen, fit into the political world and in what relation to the state and federal governments of the United States?

The course concentrates on the political philosophy, political history, governmental institutions, and political processes of American and state government as they have developed up to this day.
Course lectures will be supplemented by guest lectures and videos.  Class attendance and participation is expected; students may be called upon in class.
    The course is accompanied by a required text and a required course packet, which contains documents and readings from the founding, American history, Supreme Court cases, scholarship in political science, and other readings.


Grading Policy:
Final grades will be determined in the following proportions.  Your instructor and Teaching Assistant may also factor in your improvement over the course of the semester and how your grades are distributed among course components.

1.    Tests             65%
There are four tests; the first three are worth 15 percent of your grade, and the fourth is worth 20 percent of your grade.  These are multiple-choice tests with short essay components.  Missing more than one test (i.e., two or more) may be grounds for failure.

2.    Class projects        12%
You have four short assignments in which you have to learn about your congressional representative, U.S. senator, state representative (Texas or otherwise), and state senator (Texas or otherwise).  Each assignment is worth three percent of your course grade.  The assignments will be described in more detail once the class begins.

3.    Class participation    13%
You are evaluated on your participation in the class.  You will be evaluated on your engagement in class, on your contributions to the Blackboard (BB) discussion site, and on other indicators of your interest and participation in the course.  You are also welcome to speak to your instructor after class, in office hours, or by appointment.  (Also see general rules below.)
    
Note that attendance is required, and I shall be calling on students at random to discuss the day’s topics or to answer questions about texts.  If you miss more than one time when you are being called upon, your participation grade may be affected.

4.    Quizzes            10%
    You are responsible for periodic quizzes (six in all) on the assigned readings and lectures (2 percent each, the lowest quiz grade will be dropped).  Each quiz will review basic facts contained in the readings and lectures, including guest lectures and films.


Textbooks:
Thomas Dye and Bartholomew Sparrow, Politics in America, Texas Edition, 8th Ed.  Pearson Longman, 2009.  IBSN: 13: 978-0-13-602724-9
Required Packet of readings, available at IT Copies at 512 W. MLK***

GOV 381J • Pol Institutions And Processes

38765 • Fall 2010
Meets T 330pm-630pm BAT 5.102
show description

This seminar introduces graduate students to the study of American politics and government.   The course reviews both classic and more recent scholarship on issues in American political science.  The readings address a range of topics, from questions of democracy, the political system, and political culture, to ones of particular aspects of American politics, such as public opinion, partisanship, Congress, the presidency, and the judiciary.  Students read what political scientists have written (and argued) about the different topics related to political science on the United States.  Of special concern are the controversies within the discipline: where do political scientists disagree, and why?  What are the implications of how political scientists have worked as professionals?

Classes will be devoted to intensive reading and critical discussion of the literature (and related scholarship) of that week’s topic.  Discussion will be of the works read for that day as well as other approaches and scholarship on related issues.  Each week, a designated student leader will provide critical overviews of the topic and direct the seminar discussion.  All other students will be responsible for a question for one or more of that week’s readings.  Students’ written assignments will consist of book reviews and a capstone review essay as part of students’ professional training.
 
The last third of each class period will consist of exercises for devising appropriate research designs for the topic of that week.   Students will work in small groups so as to devise ways of furthering quality scholarship in the subfield of American political science addressed in that week’s reading.


Assessment

Grades will be based on student presentations and seminar leadership, class participation and reading question, book reviews (2), and review essay.

Student presentation/class leadership (2 ea.):            20%
Class discussion and weekly questions:                20%
Book Reviews (3), 1000 words each:                20%
Review Essay:                            20%
Take-home Final:                            20%    

GOV 370L • Politics Of Food In America

38964 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm PAR 301
show description

Course Description:

Analysis of varying topics in the study of American government and politics.

Prerequisite:

Six semester hours of lower-division coursework in government.

Grading:

TBD

Readings:

TBD

 

 

 

GOV 370L • Us As Territorial Nation-W

38996 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 930-1100 BAT 5.102
show description

Course Description:

Analysis of varying topics in the study of American government and politics.

Prerequisite:

Six semester hours of lower-division coursework in government.

Grading:

TBD

Readings:

TBD

 

 

 

GOV 370L • Us As Territorial Nation-W

39335 • Fall 2009
Meets MW 300pm-430pm RAS 310
show description

Course Description:

Analysis of varying topics in the study of American government and politics.

Prerequisite:

Six semester hours of lower-division coursework in government.

Grading:

TBD

Readings:

TBD

 

 

 

GOV 370L • Us As Territorial Nation-W

84605 • Summer 2009
Meets MTWTHF 1000-1130 PAR 302
show description

Course Description:

Analysis of varying topics in the study of American government and politics.

Prerequisite:

Six semester hours of lower-division coursework in government.

Grading:

TBD

Readings:

TBD

 

 

 

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