Skip Navigation
UT wordmark
College of Liberal Arts wordmark
government masthead
Robert G. Moser, Chair BAT 2.116, Mailcode A1800, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-5121

Patrick McDonald

Associate Professor Ph.D., Ohio State University

Patrick McDonald

Contact

Biography

Professor McDonald teaches courses on international relations theory, international political economy, and international security. His current research focuses on the economic causes of war and peace. His book, The Invisible Hand of Peace: Capitalism, the War Machine, and International Relations Theory, was published by Cambridge University Press in March 2009. His research has been published in the American Journal of Political Science, International Studies Quarterly, the Journal of Conflict Resolution, The Washington Quarterly, and World Politics. Prior to arriving at UT, Professor McDonald was a postdoctoral fellow at the Christopher H. Browne Center for International Politics at the University of Pennsylvania.

Recent Publications:
2009. The Invisible Hand of Peace: Capitalism, the War Machine, and International Relations Theory. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

GOV 388K • Study Of Internatl Relations

39090 • Fall 2014
Meets TH 1230pm-330pm BAT 5.102
show description

GOV 388K, Study of International Relations

Fall 2014

 

Description

 This graduate course on the study of international relations provides a broad theoretical overview of the field of international relations, surveying some of its most prominent contributions during the past thirty years.  It is designed to help you prepare to take the Ph.D. preliminary exams for the IR subfield in the Government Department and to help you prepare to execute your own original research projects.  The substance of the course is conceptually organized around the question of how social order is constructed and sustained in the international system.  Our discussions of theory will focus on the following sources of order:  balance of power, hegemony, technology, ideas, norms, international organizations, globalization, territory, and domestic regime type. 

 

Course requirements

There will be three key requirements for this course.  First, you will be expected to attend class, keep up with the assigned readings, and participate in our discussions.  Second, you will maintain a regular reading journal that will be randomly collected throughout the semester.  Third, you will also complete a comprehensive in-class final exam during the assigned exam period.  Your final grade will be tabulated as follows: 

 

Class participation                                                                              20%

Reading journal                                                                                   35%

            (collected at least three times during the semester)

Final Exam                                                                                          45%

 

 

Texts

 

Kenneth N. Waltz.  1979.  Theory of International Politics.  McGraw-Hill.

 

Martha Finnemore.  1996.  National Interests in International Society.  Ithaca:  Cornell University Press.

 

Alexander Wendt.  1999.  Social Theory of International Politics.  Cambridge University Press.

 

G. John Ikenberry.  2001.  After Victory:  Institutions, Strategic Restraint, and the Rebuilding of Order After Major Wars.  Princeton University Press.

 

David A. Lake and Robert Powell, eds.  1999.  Strategic Choice and International Relations.  Princeton University Press.

 

Beth A. Simmons.  2009.  Mobilizing for Human Rights:  International Law in Domestic Politics.  New York:  Cambridge University Press.

 

R. Harrison Wagner.  2007.  War and the State:  The Theory of International Politics.  Ann Arbor:  University of Michigan Press.

 

David A. Lake.  2009.  Hierarchy in International Relations.  Ithaca:  Cornell University Press.

GOV 360N • Internat Politics Econ Crisis

39265 • Spring 2014
Meets MW 300pm-430pm CBA 4.344
show description

DESCRIPTION

This course meets the university’s writing flag requirement.  It examines the international political causes and consequences of key economic crises in the twentieth century--the Great Depression and the Great Recession that began in 2008.  We will explore the following questions:  what are the political mechanisms by which a crisis in one country spreads to another?  What impedes or facilitates international cooperative efforts to stem economic crises?  How do crises transform domestic political coalitions and/or institutions?  Under what conditions can an economic crisis generate international political change and war?  The discussion and the requirements of the course will push students to think abstractly, to utilize theoretical concepts to interpret key historical events over the past century, and to improve their writing skills. 

 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

 

There will be four sets of requirements for this course.  First, you will be expected to attend class, keep up with the assigned readings, participate in our discussions, and complete short in-class writing assignments and/or quizzes.  Second, you will complete a series of short writing assignments that that will generally ask you to summarize and comment on a reading.  Third, you will turn in a midterm.  Fourth, you will complete a final paper.  This last paper will be completed in two parts—a first draft and a revised final draft.  These requirements will provide the following components of your final grade:

 

Attendance, participation, and quizzes                                      20%

Shorting writing assignments                                                    15%

Paper 1                                                                                 25%

Paper 2                                                                                   

            First draft                                                                    15%

            Final draft                                                                   25%

 

READING MATERIALS

The reading material for this course will be made available through two primary formats.  First, our course blackboard site will contain electronic copies of our assigned article readings.  Second, the following required texts are available at the University Co-op bookstore.

 

Barry Eichengreen.  1992.  Golden Fetters:  The Gold Standard and the Great Depression, 1919-1939.  New York:  Oxford University Press.

 

Menzie D. Chinn and Jeffry A. Frieden.  2011.  Lost Decades:  The Making of America’s Debt Crisis and the Long Recovery.  New York:  Norton. 

 

Michael Lewis.  2011.  Boomerang:  Travels in the Third World.  New York:  Norton.

 

Flag: Writing

GOV 388L • Research In Intl Politics

39490 • Spring 2014
Meets MW 430pm-600pm BAT 5.102
show description

This graduate course is designed to prepare students with scholarly interests in international relations to conduct their own original research.  It will introduce students to research design fundamentals, with a specific emphasis on the challenges that are specific to the field of international relations.  We will explore such topics as causal inference, conceptualization, measurement, data set construction, experimental design, archival research, and process tracing.  I will also introduce students to statistical estimators that are commonly used in international relations.

 

Requirements:

 

Students will have complete regular small task-oriented assignments and one larger project during this course.  The smaller assignments will include replicating existing studies, recoding variables from existing data sets, short literature reviews, and dataset construction.  The final project will be a research design that identifies a research question, the broader academic literature within which it is embedded, a theoretical framework capable of generating hypotheses to answer this question, and a plan for conducting empirical research that tests these hypotheses. 

 

Readings:

 

Gary King, Robert O. Keohane, and Sidney Verba.  1994.  Designing Social Inquiry:  Designing Social Inquiry:  Scientific Inference in Qualitative Research.  Princeton University Press.

 

Henry E. Brady and David Collier, eds.  2010.  Rethinking Social Inquiry:  Diverse Tools, Shared Standards.  Rowman and Littlefield. 

 

Kevin M. Clarke and David Primo.  2012.  A Model Discipline:  Political Science and the Logic of Representations.  Oxford University Press.

GOV 360N • Internat Politics Econ Crisis

38913 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 930am-1100am MEZ 2.122
show description

Course Description

This course examines the international political causes and consequences of key economic crises in the twentieth century--the Great Depression and the Great Recession that began in 2008.  We will explore the following questions:  what are the political mechanisms by which a crisis in one country spreads to another?  What impedes or facilitates international cooperative efforts to stem economic crises?  How do crises transform domestic political coalitions and/or institutions?  Under what conditions can an economic crisis generate international political change and war?  The discussion and the requirements of the course will push students to think abstractly and to utilize theoretical concepts to interpret key historical events over the past century.

 

This course will fulfill the writing flag requirement.  Writing assignments will generally take two forms.  First, students will write a series of short journal entries that test their ability to summarize concisely the theoretical arguments generated and defended empirically in the assigned readings.  Second, students will write at least two extended essays that compare prominent explanations for the origins of one or more of these economic crises.

 

Grading Policy

The following components will make up the final grade:

 

Attendance and participation:               15%

Short writing assignments                    15%

Paper 1                                             30%

Paper 2 (rough draft)                          10%

Paper 2                                             30%

 

 

Texts

Barry Eichengreen.  1995.  Golden Fetters:  The Gold Standard and the Great Depression.  New York:  Oxford University Press.

 

Menzie D. Chinn and Jeffry A. Frieden.  2011.  Lost Decades:  The Making of America’s Debt Crisis and the Long Recovery.  New York:  Norton.

GOV 360N • Internatl Political Economy

38780 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm PAR 203
show description

Course Description

This is an introductory course to the study of international political economy.  Its primary focus will be the reciprocal interaction between markets and political behavior in the international system.  We will explore such questions as why do states trade?  Under what conditions do governments restrict international commerce?  How does capital mobility constrain national economic policy?  What is the role of international organizations such as the IMF in fostering development?  Do extensive natural resource endowments limit long-term economic growth? Does globalization promote peace?  How does oil consumption threaten national security? 

 

Grading Policy

There will be three requirements for this course.  First, you will be expected to attend class, keep up with the assigned readings, participate in our discussions, and complete short in-class writing assignments and/or quizzes.  Second, there will be two mid-term examinations.  Third, a comprehensive final exam will be given during the assigned.

Attendance, participation, and quizzes- 20%

Midterm 1- 20%

Midterm 2- 25%

Final- 35%

 

Texts

The reading material for this course will be made available through two primary formats.  First, our course blackboard site will contain electronic copies of our assigned article readings.  Second, the following required texts are available at the University Co-op bookstore.

Paul Collier.  2010.  The Plundered Planet:  Why we must and how we can—manage nature for global prosperity.  New York:  Oxford University Press.

Dani Rodrik.  2011.  The Globalization Paradox:  Democracy and the Future of the World Economy.  New York:  Norton.

GOV 388K • Study Of Internatl Relations

38945 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 930am-1100am BAT 1.104
show description

Course Description

This graduate course on the study of international relations will survey some of the most prominent contributions to the field during the past thirty years.  It will be composed of two key parts.  The first is theoretical and will be oriented around a survey of multiple sources of political order in the international system, including the balance of power, hegemony, technology, ideas, norms, international organizations, globalization, nation states, and domestic regime type.  The second, focused on basic issues of research design, will examine some common empirical challenges to generating cumulative research in the field of international relations.    

 

Grading Policy

There will be four key requirements for this course.  First, you will be expected to attend class, keep up with the assigned readings, and participate in our discussions.  Second, you will complete a series of short weekly writing assignments.  Third, you will write a research proposal on the topic of your choice.  Fourth, you will complete a comprehensive in-class final exam during the assigned exam period.  Your final grade will be tabulated as follows: 

Class participation- 15%

Weekly writing assignments- 25%    

Research proposal- 30%

Final Exam- 30%

 

Texts

Kenneth N. Waltz.  1979.  Theory of International Politics.  McGraw-Hill.

Alexander Wendt.  1999.  Social Theory of International Politics.  Cambridge University Press.

G. John Ikenberry.  2001.  After Victory:  Institutions, Strategic Restraint, and the Rebuilding of Order After Major Wars.  Princeton University Press.

David A. Lake.  2009.  Hierarchy in International Relations.  Ithaca:  Cornell University Press.

Beth A. Simmons.  2009.  Mobilizing for Human Rights:  International Law in Domestic Politics.  New York:  Cambridge University Press.

GOV 360N • International Security

38780 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am MEZ B0.306
show description

This course is designed to provide you with a broad introduction to the conditions and motivations behind the use of military force in the contemporary political world.  Traditionally, this subfield in international relations has focused on how states use or threaten to use violence to preserve their sovereignty and resolve political conflicts with other states.  We will begin by examining how the anarchical structure of the international system constrains a state’s ability to meet these responsibilities.  This discussion will then lead into an examination of the origins of war between states and nuclear deterrence theory.  After these sections, we will explore whether the task of protecting national security has changed in the post-Cold War and post-9/11 worlds.

GOV 360N • Intro To Internatl Relatns

38775 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 930am-1100am MEZ B0.306
show description

see syllabus

GOV 360N • Internatl Political Economy

38780 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm MEZ B0.306
show description

see syllabus

GOV F360N • International Security

85275 • Summer 2011
Meets MTWTHF 100pm-230pm MEZ B0.306
show description

This course is designed to provide you with a broad introduction to the conditions and motivations behind the use of military force in the contemporary political world. Traditionally, this subfield in international relations has focused on how states use or threaten to use violence to preserve their sovereignty and resolve political conflicts with other states.  We will begin by examining how the anarchical structure of the international system constrains a state’s ability to meet these responsibilities.  This discussion will then lead into an examination of the origins of war between states and nuclear deterrence theory.  After these sections, we will explore whether the task of protecting national security has changed in the post-Cold War and post-9/11 worlds.  In particular, we will explore the following questions.  Does nuclear proliferation enhance or diminish international stability?  Under what conditions do civil wars occur?  Does terrorism provide a unique challenge to sovereign states?  Does globalization enhance or diminish national security? What strategies should the United States adopt to cope with traditional and emerging threats to its political interests?

GOV 360N • International Security

38995 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am PAR 1
show description

This course is designed to provide you with a broad introduction to the conditions and motivations behind the use of military force in the contemporary political world. Traditionally, this subfield in international relations has focused on how states use or threaten to use violence to preserve their sovereignty and resolve political conflicts with other states.  We will begin by examining how the anarchical structure of the international system constrains a state’s ability to meet these responsibilities.  This discussion will then lead into an examination of the origins of war between states and nuclear deterrence theory.  After these sections, we will explore whether the task of protecting national security has changed in the post-Cold War and post-9/11 worlds.  In particular, we will explore the following questions.  Does nuclear proliferation enhance or diminish international stability?  Under what conditions do civil wars occur?  Does terrorism provide a unique challenge to sovereign states?  Does globalization enhance or diminish national security? What strategies should the United States adopt to cope with traditional and emerging threats to its political interests?

GOV 388L • Bargaining & War In Intl Hist

39190 • Spring 2011
Meets W 1230pm-330pm BAT 1.104
show description

This advanced graduate course lies at the intersection of literatures on structural theories of international politics, bargaining and war, and diplomatic history. It will focus on two intellectual changes—reviewing an emerging return to structural theories of international politics; and the utilization of an alternative framework, derived from bargaining theory, to critique existing structural theories of international politics and reexamine prominent claims in the field of diplomatic history.

GOV 360N • International Relations Theory

38600 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 900am-1000am PAR 301
show description

Course Description

This is a discussion-intensive course that surveys multiple traditions in international relations theory.  It will first introduce students to “thinking theoretically” in the social sciences, or the process of building and refining logically consistent and empirically-validated explanations for social outcomes. We will discuss such things as hypothesis construction, parsimony, and empirical evidence; and practice generating empirical implications from our theories.  The bulk of the course though will be a series of six to eight units in which we exploit this theoretical focus to examine prominent topics in contemporary global politics.  These units will span across the four subfields of international relations—international security, international political economy, international organization, and foreign policy.  A selection of the following topics will be covered in various iterations of this course:  origins of war, the durability of peace settlements, the international politics of financial regulation, the international politics of economic crisis, the international politics of human rights, exchange rate cooperation, the global trading regime, global environmental regulation, transnational activism, humanitarian intervention, the political consequences of nuclear proliferation, and the politics of international investment.  Our readings will be drawn primarily from academic journals.  Students will be assessed on the basis of daily activities in class (quizzes and participation) and three argumentative essays of five to seven pages each.

 

Grading Criteria

Attendance, participation, and quizzes 25%

Paper 1 20%

Paper 2 25%

Paper 3 30%

Textbooks:

Helen V. Milner.  1997.  Interests, Institutions, and Information:  Domestic Politics and International Relations. Princeton University Press.
 
Michael Barnett and Martha Finnemore. 2004.  Rules for the World:  International Organizations in Global Politics. Cornell University Press.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

GOV 360N • Internatl Political Economy

38615 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am MEZ B0.306
show description

Course Description: This is an introductory course to the study of international political economy.  Its primary focus will be the reciprocal interaction between markets and political behavior in the international system.  We will explore such questions as why do states trade? Under what conditions do governments restrict international commerce?  How does capital mobility constrain national economic policy?  What is the role of international organizations such as the IMF in fostering development?  Do extensive natural resource endowments limit long-term economic growth? Does globalization promote peace?  How does oil consumption threaten national security? 

 

Textbooks:

Douglas Irwin.  2009.  Free Trade Under Fire, 3d edition.  Princeton:  Princeton University Press.

Paul Collier.  2007.  The Bottom Billion:  Why the Poorest Countries are Failing and What Can be Done About It.  New York:  Oxford University Press.

Patrick J. McDonald.  2009.  The Invisible Hand of Peace:  Capitalism, the War Machine, and International Relations Theory.  New York:  Cambridge University Press.

Simon Johnson and James Kwak.  2010.  13 Bankers:  The Wall Street Takeover and the Next Financial Meltdown.  New York:  Pantheon.

GOV 360N • International Security

84782 • Summer 2010
Meets MTWTHF 100pm-230pm MEZ B0.306
show description

Description: This course is designed to provide you with a broad introduction to the conditions and motivations behind the use of military force in the contemporary political world. Traditionally, this subfield in international relations has focused on how states use or threaten to use violence to preserve their sovereignty and resolve political conflicts with other states.  We will begin by examining how the anarchical structure of the international system constrains a state’s ability to meet these responsibilities.  This discussion will then lead into an examination of the origins of war between states and nuclear deterrence theory.  After these sections, we will explore whether the task of protecting national security has changed in the post-Cold War and post-9/11 worlds.  In particular, we will explore the following questions.  Does nuclear proliferation enhance or diminish international stability?  Under what conditions do civil wars occur?  Does terrorism provide a unique challenge to sovereign states?  Does globalization enhance or diminish national security? What strategies should the United States adopt to cope with traditional and emerging threats to its political interests?

Grading policy:
 
Attendance, participation, and quizzes                                              20%                                         
Midterm exam                                                                                25%
Paper                                                                                             25%
Final                                                                                              30%
 
Textbooks:
 David Fromkin.  2004.  Europe’s Last Summer:  Who Started the Great War in 1914?  New York: Knopf.

bottom border