Skip Navigation
UT wordmark
College of Liberal Arts wordmark
government masthead
Robert G. Moser, Chair BAT 2.116, Mailcode A1800, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-5121

Jeffrey Tulis

Associate Professor Ph.D., University of Chicago

Jeffrey Tulis

Contact

Biography

Professor Tulis's interests bridge the fields of political theory and American politics, including more specifically, American political development, constitutional theory, political philosophy and the American presidency.  His publications include The Presidency in the Constitutional Order (LSU, 1981; Transaction, 2010), The Rhetorical Presidency (Princeton, 1987), The Constitutional Presidency (Johns Hopkins 2009), The Limits of Constitutional Democracy (Princeton, 2010) and recent journal articles and chapters on constitutional interpretation, the logic of political change, and the meaning of political success. Four collections of essays on The Rhetorical Presidency with responses by Tulis have been published, most recently a special double issue of Critical Review: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Politics and Society, (2007), where his book is described as "one of the two or three most important and perceptive works written by a political scientist in the twentieth century."

He has served as President of the Politics and History Section of the American Political Science Association. He received the President's Associates Teaching Excellence Award at the University of Texas. He has held research fellowships from NEH, ACLS, Olin Foundation, Harvard Law School, and the Mellon Preceptorship at Princeton University, where he taught before moving to Texas. He has held visiting positions at Notre Dame and Harvard. He has served as associate chair of the Department of Government from 1989-2001 and was acting chair during 1992-93. and for part of each year between 1989 and 2001. During the academic year 2008-09, he was a Laurance S. Rockefeller Visiting Fellow at the University Center for Human Values at Princeton.

Recent publications include "Andrew Johnson and the Politics of Failure" (with Nicole Mellow), in Stephen Skowronek and Matthew Glassman, eds. Formative Acts: Reckoning with Agency in American Politics, Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2007. His forthcoming books include: Democratic Decay and the Politics of Deference (Princeton, 2012), Legacies of Loss in American Politics , with Nicole Mellow (Princeton, 2013), and an expanded edition of The Rhetorical Presidency (Princeton, 2013). For two decades he served as co-editor of the Johns Hopkins Series in Constitutional Thought, and he currently co-edits (with Sanford Levinson) a new series titled Constitutional Thinking, at the University Press of Kansas.

Interests

Political Theory and American Politics

GOV 379S • Regime Persp On Amer Politics

38100 • Spring 2015
Meets T 330pm-630pm MEZ 1.104
(also listed as CTI 335, LAH 350 )
show description

This is a seminar on American politics and culture.   Two purposes govern the selection of texts for the course and guide our discussion of them.  All of our texts attempt to look at American politics as a whole.  Most books and courses on America look at only a part, such as the Presidency, or elections, or popular culture.  Here we attempt to think about how the parts of America fit together.  Even when these texts speak about a part, for example an institution such as the presidency or the Congress, they present the topic from a vantage point on the whole polity.   To see the polity as a whole also means that we will have to revisit and rethink aspects of our political life that we take for granted – that we don’t examine because those parts have become so natural or familiar to us.  Seeing the polity whole enables us to render the familiar unfamiliar, to make what we take for granted strange and new.

 

To see the polity as a whole requires that we get some distance from our subject, much as to see the planet earth as a whole requires one to look at it from outer space.  Just as it is difficult to get visual perspective on a place living within it, it is difficult to understand the promise or pathologies of a regime from within.  To get critical distance from our politics, we will closely study three sets of texts that look at American politics from a distance.   The first part of the course will recover the perspective of the founding debate between Federalists and Anti-federalists.   This fundamental debate reveals what is a stake in the basic architecture of the American regime.  The second part of the course is a close study of Tocqueville’s Democracy in America.  Regarded by many as the best book ever written on democracy and the best book written on America, Tocqueville sees our polity whole because he looks at it from the vantage point of Europe, in general, and France, in particular.  In the third part of the seminar we think about American politics from the perspective of thoughtful commentators who feel only nominally included in the polity.   Half in and half out, these extraordinary black American writers reveal fissures and fault lines in the American regime.  We end the class with a discussion of America’s place in the world today – examining a speech by a writer who articulately raises challenges to our self-understanding that are inarticulately expressed today in rage and ranting from enemies of the United States.

 

Requirements:

 

Three take home analytic essays, chosen from a list of topics I provide, each weighted 25% of the course grade.  Late essays will not be accepted, except with a doctor’s excuse or a Dean’s excuse for family emergency.

 

OR as an option: you may write the two short essays (both together weighted 25%) and do a longer 15 page paper on a topic of your choice in consultation with me (weighted 50% of your course grade).   Government honors students who are thinking of doing an honors thesis next year may prefer this option to begin to develop research and writing skills for longer work.  Students who prefer this option will need to designate their preferred third short essay and have discussed with me a topic for their long paper by March 30. 

 

Texts:

The Federalist

Selected Anti-Federalist writings

Tocqueville, Democracy in America

Essays, speeches and articles by Frederick Douglass, W.E.B. Dubois, Booker T. Washington, James Baldwin and Ralph Ellison

GOV 382M • Tocqueville

38135 • Spring 2015
Meets M 330pm-630pm BAT 5.102
show description

This graduate seminar will be devoted to close readings of two principal writings of Tocqueville: Democracy in America and The Ancien Regime and the Revolution. We will also assess some of the best secondary studies of Tocqueville, including work by Sheldon Wolin, Harvey Mansfield, Delba Winthrop, Jon Elster, Francois Furet, and a book by Pierre Manent.

 

Course requirements will include two very short analytic essays and one seminar paper (20-25 pages).

GOV 310L • American Government-Honors

38722 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm GAR 2.112
show description

Introduction to American Politics

 

This honors seminar offers an introduction to American politics that emphasizes the confluence of ideas, mores, institutions, and interests, in the constitutional system. This course covers more theory, and the readings are more demanding, than other versions of GOV 310. 

 

One of the main objectives of the course is to deepen your understanding of the practical aspects of contemporary public affairs by developing your ability to understand the theoretical foundations of American politics.  Although we cover the nuts and bolts of politics there is much more theory in this version of GOV 310. If you have registered for this section mainly because 310 is a legislative requirement that you need to fulfill, this is not the right version for you.  There is a substantial workload in this class.

 

Regular attendance, thorough and timely preparation, and active participation are all necessary to do well.

 

Course requirements:

 

  1. Four essays (approximately 1000 words each).  Three of these will be assigned analytic essay topics. The last will be a book review of a title chosen by the student from a long list of provided possibilities.   (15% each essay, 60% of total course grade)

 

  1. Two in-class tests. These will count 15% each, 30% of total course grade.

 

  1. Class participation. (10% of course grade).  Both informed participation and occasional leadership of the seminar will be graded.

 

No make-up exams or late papers, except for documented medical or other emergencies.

 

Texts: (tentative)

Joseph M. Bessette and John J. Pitney, American Government and Politics: Deliberation, Democracy and Citizenship

Mary Nichols and David Nichols, Readings in American Government

Thomas Mann and Norman Ornstein, Its Even Worse Than It Looks: How the American Constitutional System Collided With the New Politics of Extremism

Bruce Ackerman,Before the Next Attack: Preserving Civil Liberties in an Age of Terrorism

GOV 370L • Presidency In Constitutl Order

38977 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 930am-1100am CBA 4.332
show description

Jeffrey K. Tulis

The Presidency in the Constitutional Order

 

A study of the place of the presidency in the American political order that stresses

    tension between power and accountability inherent in the office and the system.

    Topics include: separation of powers, presidential selection, impeachment,

    relations with Congress and bureaucracy, emergency powers, presidential

    character, and leadership.

 

This is a very demanding writing flag class.  If you are enrolling in this class just in order

to satisfy the writing flag, you are in the wrong class.  Interest in political theory and willingness

to work very hard are necessary for success in this class.

 

 

Readings (tentative):

 

Joseph M. Bessette, The Constitutional Presidency

Andrew Rudalevige, The New Imperial Presidency

Bruce Ackerman, The Rise and Decline of the American Republic

Michael Nelson, ed., The Presidency in the Political System

Michael Nelson, ed., The Evolving Presidency

Louis Fisher, Constitutional Conflicts Between Congress and the President

 

 

Requirements:

 

Active and prepared class participation

Regular quizzes on the reading

Four analytic essays (approximately 1200 words).

One term paper, (approximately 5000 words).

GOV 379S • Regime Persp On Amer Politics

39395 • Spring 2014
Meets T 330pm-630pm MEZ 1.104
(also listed as CTI 335, LAH 350 )
show description

This is a seminar on American politics and culture.   Two purposes govern the selection of texts for the course and guide our discussion of them.  All of our texts attempt to look at American politics as a whole.  Most books and courses on America look at only a part, such as the Presidency, or elections, or popular culture.  Here we attempt to think about how the parts of America fit together.  Even when these texts speak about a part, for example an institution such as the presidency or the Congress, they present the topic from a vantage point on the whole polity.   To see the polity as a whole also means that we will have to revisit and rethink aspects of our political life that we take for granted – that we don’t examine because those parts have become so natural or familiar to us.  Seeing the polity whole enables us to render the familiar unfamiliar, to make what we take for granted strange and new.

 

To see the polity as a whole requires that we get some distance from our subject, much as to see the planet earth as a whole requires one to look at it from outer space.  Just as it is difficult to get visual perspective on a place living within it, it is difficult to understand the promise or pathologies of a regime from within.  To get critical distance from our politics, we will closely study three sets of texts that look at American politics from a distance.   The first part of the course will recover the perspective of the founding debate between Federalists and Anti-federalists.   This fundamental debate reveals what is a stake in the basic architecture of the American regime.  The second part of the course is a close study of Tocqueville’s Democracy in America.  Regarded by many as the best book ever written on democracy and the best book written on America, Tocqueville sees our polity whole because he looks at it from the vantage point of Europe, in general, and France, in particular.  In the third part of the seminar we think about American politics from the perspective of thoughtful commentators who feel only nominally included in the polity.   Half in and half out, these extraordinary black American writers reveal fissures and fault lines in the American regime.  We end the class with a discussion of America’s place in the world today – examining a speech by a writer who articulately raises challenges to our self-understanding that are inarticulately expressed today in rage and ranting from enemies of the United States.

 

Requirements:

 

Three take home analytic essays, chosen from a list of topics I provide, each weighted 25% of the course grade.  Late essays will not be accepted, except with a doctor’s excuse or a Dean’s excuse for family emergency.

 

OR as an option: you may write the two short essays (both together weighted 25%) and do a longer 15 page paper on a topic of your choice in consultation with me (weighted 50% of your course grade).   Government honors students who are thinking of doing an honors thesis next year may prefer this option to begin to develop research and writing skills for longer work.  Students who prefer this option will need to designate their preferred third short essay and have discussed with me a topic for their long paper by March 30. 

 

Texts:

The Federalist

Selected Anti-Federalist writings

Tocqueville, Democracy in America

Essays, speeches and articles by Frederick Douglass, W.E.B. Dubois, Booker T. Washington, James Baldwin and Ralph Ellison

GOV 381L • Constitutional Conflict

39415 • Spring 2014
Meets M 330pm-630pm BAT 1.104
show description

Course Description:

 

     Many of the most important debates regarding the nature and character of contemporary American politics are essentially arguments regarding the structure of separation of powers.  In this seminar we will consider such questions as whether the American system is prone to deadlock of stalemate in the construction of national policy; whether conflict is a hindrance to institutional responsibility or an essential attribute of responsibility; whether there are “political questions” especially suitable to resolution between President and Congress; how one can distinguish salutary from pathological conflict, and whether it is truly possible to harness the ambition of office holders to the duties of their office.

     More specifically, we will review literature and arguments regarding constitutional reform; divided government; separation of powers theory; and case studies of Supreme Court appointments; the budget process; and war powers and foreign affairs. In these contexts we will also discuss current controversies surrounding war authorization, intelligence and secrecy, sequestration, government shut downs and budget resolutions, and debt ceiling politics.

     The course is designed to accommodate two different student needs: it will provide a good overview of important literature relevant to the comprehensive examination in American politics and it will provide opportunities for research.  This subject area is a treasure trove of “hot” topics, publication possibilities, subjects for MA theses and Ph.D. dissertations.   I will tailor the written requirements to the objectives of individual students.

 

Grading:

 

1. All students will prepare a short analytic essay early in the semester, and an annotated bibliography at mid-semester.  These assignments will count (30%) of the grade.

2. Students interested primarily in exam preparation will complete an examination near the end of the semester based on study questions assigned in advance. OR

   Students interested in research will write a 20-25 page paper. (60%)

3. A basic requirement of the course is that students prepare for each seminar by carefully reading the material assigned for that week.  Class discussion is an essential component of the course. (10%)

 

Tentative Texts:

Jones, Separate But Equal Branches

The Federalist

Silverstein, Imbalance of Powers

Wilson & Schram, Separation of Powers and Good Government

Burgess, Contest for Constitutional Authority

Farrier, Passing the Buck: Congress, the Budget and Deficits

Weissman, A Culture of Deference

Zeisberg, War Powers: The Politics of Constitutional Authority

Fisher, Congressional Abdication on War and Spending

Lowi, The End of Liberalism

GOV 330K • The American President

39140 • Fall 2013
Meets MW 300pm-430pm MEZ B0.306
show description

Course Description

This course offers an over view of the place of the presidency in the American political order.  Topics covered include: constitutional design of the office; nominations and elections; legislative leadership; leadership of the bureaucracy; staffing and organizing the White House; the presidency and the judiciary; war and emergencies.  We will spend extra time this fall on the presidential campaign and election of 2012.

 

Grading Policy

Two in-class examinations  (50% of the final grade)

One short (1000 word) take-home essay (30% of the final grade)

Class participation and quizzes (20% of the final grade)

 

Texts

Richard J. Ellis, The Development of the American Presidency (Routledge, 2012)

Richard J. Ellis and Michael Nelson, eds, Debating the American Presidency, (2nd edition, CQ Press, 2009)

Packet of selected primary texts (to be linked or posted on Blackboard).

GOV 330K • The American President

39145 • Fall 2013
Meets MW 500pm-630pm MEZ B0.306
show description

Course Description

This course offers an over view of the place of the presidency in the American political order.  Topics covered include: constitutional design of the office; nominations and elections; legislative leadership; leadership of the bureaucracy; staffing and organizing the White House; the presidency and the judiciary; war and emergencies.  We will spend extra time this fall on the presidential campaign and election of 2012.

 

Grading Policy

Two in-class examinations  (50% of the final grade)

One short (1000 word) take-home essay (30% of the final grade)

Class participation and quizzes (20% of the final grade)

 

Texts

Richard J. Ellis, The Development of the American Presidency (Routledge, 2012)

Richard J. Ellis and Michael Nelson, eds, Debating the American Presidency, (2nd edition, CQ Press, 2009)

Packet of selected primary texts (to be linked or posted on Blackboard).

GOV 381L • American Founding

39040 • Spring 2013
Meets T 630pm-930pm BAT 1.104
show description

NOTE WELL:  Course meets Tuesdays, 6:30 to 9:30pm

Batts Hall  1.104

 

 

Course Description:

This is a seminar on American political thought and constitutional design.  It is designed for students of American politics and political theory.  The principal themes include: 1) the nature of founding and its constitutive significance; 2) the relation of structure and power in American politics; 3) the meaning and significance of the Federalist/Anti-Federalist debate; 4) the philosophic background of the American founding; and 5) the relevance of the founding to debate to prospects for, and pathologies of, American politics today.

We will conduct a close reading of the Madison’s Notes, of The Federalist, and selected Anti-Federalist writings.  We will also study a larger and growing body of secondary literature on the constitutional convention, ratification and early American political thought.

 

Texts:

James Madison, Notes of the Debates: In the Federal Convention of 1787

The Federalist (Rossiter, ed.)

The Anti-Federalist (Storing, ed.)

David Brian Robertson, The Constitution and America’s Destiny (2005)

Pauline Maier, Ratification (2012)

Gordon Wood, The Idea of America (2011)

Jack Rakove, Original Meanings: Politics & Ideas in the Making of the Constitution

Herbert Storing, What the Anti-Federalists Were For (1981)

Numerous essays and articles (to be posted on line or gathered in packet)

 

Grading: 

Active seminar participation, including three short papers and presentations (40%) and one article-length seminar paper (60%)

GOV 330K • The American President

38675 • Fall 2012
Meets MW 300pm-430pm MEZ B0.306
show description

Course Description

This course offers an over view of the place of the presidency in the American political order.  Topics covered include: constitutional design of the office; nominations and elections; legislative leadership; leadership of the bureaucracy; staffing and organizing the White House; the presidency and the judiciary; war and emergencies.  We will spend extra time this fall on the presidential campaign and election of 2012.

 

Grading Policy

Two in-class examinations  (50% of the final grade)

One short (1000 word) take-home essay (30% of the final grade)

Class participation and quizzes (20% of the final grade)

 

Texts

Richard J. Ellis, The Development of the American Presidency (Routledge, 2012)

Richard J. Ellis and Michael Nelson, eds, Debating the American Presidency, (2nd edition, CQ Press, 2009)

Packet of selected primary texts (to be linked or posted on Blackboard).

GOV 330K • The American President

38680 • Fall 2012
Meets MW 500pm-630pm MEZ B0.306
show description

Course Description

This course offers an over view of the place of the presidency in the American political order.  Topics covered include: constitutional design of the office; nominations and elections; legislative leadership; leadership of the bureaucracy; staffing and organizing the White House; the presidency and the judiciary; war and emergencies.  We will spend extra time this fall on the presidential campaign and election of 2012.

 

Grading Policy

Two in-class examinations  (50% of the final grade)

One short (1000 word) take-home essay (30% of the final grade)

Class participation and quizzes (20% of the final grade)

 

Texts

Richard J. Ellis, The Development of the American Presidency (Routledge, 2012)

Richard J. Ellis and Michael Nelson, eds, Debating the American Presidency, (2nd edition, CQ Press, 2009)

Packet of selected primary texts (to be linked or posted on Blackboard).

GOV 330K • The American President

38675 • Fall 2011
Meets MW 330pm-500pm WAG 420
show description

see syllabus

GOV 330K • The American President

38680 • Fall 2011
Meets MW 530pm-700pm UTC 1.146
show description

see syllabus

GOV 379S • Regime Persp On Amer Politics

39110 • Spring 2011
Meets W 330pm-630pm BAT 5.102
(also listed as CTI 326, LAH 350 )
show description

This is a seminar on American politics and culture.   Two purposes govern the selection of texts for the course and guide our discussion of them.  All of our texts attempt to look at American politics as a whole.  Most books and courses on America look at only a part, such as the Presidency, or elections, or popular culture.  Here we attempt to think about how the parts of America fit together.  Even when these texts speak about a part, for example an institution such as the presidency or the Congress, they present the topic from a vantage point on the whole polity. To see the polity as a whole also means that we will have to revisit and rethink aspects of our political life that we take for granted – that we don’t examine because those parts have become so natural or familiar to us.  Seeing the polity whole enables us to render the familiar unfamiliar, to make what we take for granted strange and new.

To see the polity as a whole requires that we get some distance from our subject, much as to see the planet earth as a whole requires one to look at it from outer space.  Just as it is difficult to get visual perspective on a place living within it, it is difficult to understand the promise or pathologies of a regime from within it.  To get critical distance from our politics, we will closely study three sets of texts that look at American politics from a distance.   The first part of the course will recover the perspective of the founding debate between Federalists and Anti-federalists.   This fundamental debate reveals what is a stake in the basic architecture of the American regime.  The second part of the course is a close study of Tocqueville’s Democracy in America.  Regarded by many as the best book ever written on democracy and the best book written on America, Tocqueville sees our polity whole because he looks at it from the vantage point of Europe, in general, and France, in particular.  In the third part of the seminar we think about American politics from the perspective of thoughtful commentators who feel only nominally included in the polity.   Half in and half out, these extraordinary black American writers reveal fissures and fault lines in the American regime.  We end the class with a discussion of America’s place in the world today – examining a speech by a writer who articulately raises challenges to our self-understanding that are inarticulately expressed today in rage and ranting from enemies of the United States.

 

Requirements:

Four take home writing assignments.  Analytic essays, each 1000-1500 words.  (Grades weighted: 10%, 25%, 25%, and 25%)  Late essays will not be accepted, except with a doctor’s excuse or a Dean’s excuse for family emergency. Regular preparation and class participation: 15%.

OR as an option:   By prior arrangement with me by the due date of the second analytic essay, students may substitute one longer research paper (15 – 20 pages) for two of the last three analytic papers  This paper will be on a topic of the students choosing , if I approve, and the due date will be the same as the last assigned analytic essay.  This project would count 50% of the students course grade.

 

Texts:

The Federalist

Selected Anti-Federalist writings

Selected writings by Frederick Douglass, W.E.B. Dubois, Ralph Ellison, James Baldwin

Solzhenitsyn, “A World Split Apart”

Tocqueville, Democracy in America

GOV 382M • Tocqueville

39150 • Spring 2011
Meets T 630pm-930pm BAT 5.102
show description

See syllabus

GOV 370L • President, Congress, And Court

38695 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 800am-930am UTC 3.112
show description

Course Description:

    A Study of the political relationship of the President, Congress and Court in the American constitutional order.  Has this relationship changed over the course of American history?  Is American national politics prone to stalemate or deadlock between the branches regarding major issues of public policy?  Do we have a new “imperial presidency?” Should the Court arbitrate disputes between the President and Congress over custody of their respective powers? Has Congress abdicated its constitutional responsibilities? We will examine questions like these in light of practical problems such as executive privilege and secrecy, the war on terror, budget politics and controversies regarding appointments to the Supreme Court.

  
Grading:

Three in class essay tests, for which study questions will be distributed in advance.  The exam questions will be chosen from the list of study questions.  (25% each)  One short take home essay (10% each). Class participation and attendance (15%).  


Tentative Texts:
The Federalist
Fisher, Congressional Abdication on War and Spending
Rudalevige, The New Imperial Presidency
Bessette and Tulis, The Constitutional Presidency
Skowronek, Presidency in Political Time
Goldsmith, The Terror Presidency
A course packet of articles and essays

GOV 370L • President, Congress, And Court

38700 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 500pm-630pm UTC 3.122
show description

Course Description:

    A Study of the political relationship of the President, Congress and Court in the American constitutional order.  Has this relationship changed over the course of American history?  Is American national politics prone to stalemate or deadlock between the branches regarding major issues of public policy?  Do we have a new “imperial presidency?” Should the Court arbitrate disputes between the President and Congress over custody of their respective powers? Has Congress abdicated its constitutional responsibilities? We will examine questions like these in light of practical problems such as executive privilege and secrecy, the war on terror, budget politics and controversies regarding appointments to the Supreme Court.

  
Grading:

Three in class essay tests, for which study questions will be distributed in advance.  The exam questions will be chosen from the list of study questions.  (25% each)  One short take home essay (10% each). Class participation and attendance (15%).  


Tentative Texts:
The Federalist
Fisher, Congressional Abdication on War and Spending
Rudalevige, The New Imperial Presidency
Bessette and Tulis, The Constitutional Presidency
Skowronek, Presidency in Political Time
Goldsmith, The Terror Presidency
A course packet of articles and essays

GOV 312L • Iss & Policies In Amer Gov-Hon

38698 • Spring 2010
Meets MW 330pm-500pm UTC 3.104
show description

Government 312L satisfies the second half of the mandated six hours of government that every UT student must take.  Course covers analysis of varying topics concerned with American political institutions and policies, including the United States Constitution, and assumes basic knowledge of government from GOV 310L, which is a prerequiste. May be taken for credit only once.

GOV 370L • President, Congress, And Court

38966 • Spring 2010
Meets MW 500pm-630pm MEZ B0.306
show description

Course Description:

Analysis of varying topics in the study of American government and politics.

Prerequisite:

Six semester hours of lower-division coursework in government.

Grading:

TBD

Readings:

TBD

 

 

 

GOV 370L • President, Congress, And Court

39295 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm UTC 3.112
show description

Course Description:

Analysis of varying topics in the study of American government and politics.

Prerequisite:

Six semester hours of lower-division coursework in government.

Grading:

TBD

Readings:

TBD

 

 

 

Publications

Tulis, JK (2011), "Plausible Futures," in Dunn, Charles W. (ed.) The Presidency in the Twenty-First Century, University Press of Kentucky.

Tulis, J.K. and Macedo, S. (2010) The Limits of Constitutional Democracy, Princeton University Press.

Tulis, J.K. and Macedo, S. (2010) "Constitutional Boundaries," in The Limits of Constitutional Democracy, Princeton University Press.

Tulis, JK (2010), "The Possibility of Constitutional Statesmanship," in Tulis, JK and Macedo, S (eds.) The Limits of Constitutional Democracy, Princeton University Press.

Tulis, J. (2009) The Constitutional Presidency. Johns Hopkins University Press.

Tulis, J. (2009) Impeachment in the Constitutional Order. In J. Tulis & J.M. Bessette (Eds.), The Constitutional Presidency. Johns Hopkins University Press.

Tulis, J. & Bessette, J.M. (2009) On the Constitution, Politics, and the Presidency. In J. Tulis & J.M. Bessette (Eds.), The Constitutional Presidency. Johns Hopkins University Press.

Tulis, J (and Bessette, J.M) (2010) The Presidency in the Constitutional Order: Historical Perspectives,  Reissued Classics Series, Transaction Publishers,

Tulis, J and Bessette, J.M. (2010, "Introduction to the Transaction Edition," The Presidency in the Constitutional Order: Historical Perspectives, Transaction Publishers.

 

 

Tulis, JK, (2009) "The Two Constitutional Presidencies," in Nelson, Michael (ed.) The Presidency in the Political System, Congressional Quarterly Press.

Tulis, J. & Mellow, N. (2007) Andrew Johnson and the Politics of Failure. In S. Skowronek & M. Glassman (Eds.), Formative Acts: Reckoning with Agency in American Politics. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

Tulis, J. (2007, September) The Rhetorical Presidency in Retrospect. Critical Review: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Politics and Society, 19(2&3).

bottom border