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Jacqueline Jones, Chair 128 Inner Campus Dr., Stop B7000, GAR 1.104 Austin, TX 78712-1739 • 512-471-3261

Emilio Zamora

Professor Ph.D., The University of Texas at Austin

Emilio Zamora

Contact

  • Phone: 512-475-8706
  • Office: GAR 2.104B
  • Office Hours: Fall 2014: W 9 a.m.-12 p.m. & by appointment
  • Campus Mail Code: B7000

Biography

Zamora has roots in the Mexico-Texas border region dating back to the 1700s and grew up on both sides of the international line. Zamora has authored three books, co-edited three anthologies, assisted in the production of a Texas history text, translated and edited a WWI diary, and written numerous scholarly articles.  He has received six best-book awards (Texas State Historical Association, the Texas Philosophical Society, the Texas Institute of Letters, the Tejano Genealogy Society of Austin, the Texas Historical Commission, and the Southern Historical Association), a best-article prize (the Western History Association), and a Fulbright García-Robles fellowship.  Zamora is a lifetime member of the Texas Institute of Letters, a life-time Fellow with the Texas State Historical Association, a current Fellow of the Barbara White Stuart Centennial Professorship in Texas History at the University of Texas, and a current Fellow with the Institute for Historical Studies (UT, 2013-14).

Research interests

Dr. Zamora’s research interests include the history of Mexicans in the United States and their relationship with Mexico, as well as oral history, the history of the U.S. working class, Texas history, and the archival enterprise in Texas and northern Mexico.
 

Courses taught

Mexicans in the United States since 1848; Oral History, Theory and Practice; Texas History in the Twentieth Century

Awards/Honors

  • Fellow with Institute for Historical Studies, University of Texas at Austin, 2014.
  • Appointed (fourth year) Fellow, the Barbara White Stuart Centennial Professorship in Texas History, University of Texas at Austin, 2014.
  • Inducted into the Texas Institute of Letters, 2012.
  • Elected in 2012 to serve a three-year term on the Board of Directors of the Texas State Historical Association.  I also serve as the chair of the Association’s Education Committee and as a member of the Handbook of Texas Committee.
  • Four Best Book Prizes in 2010 from the Texas State Historical Association, the Philosophical Society of Texas, the Texas Institute of Letters, and the Tejano Genealogy Society of Austin for Claiming Rights and Righting Wrongs in Texas, Mexican Workers and Job Politics during World War II (College Station: Texas A&M University Press, 2009).
  • Inducted as a Fellow into the Texas State Historical Association, 2010.
  • Fulbright García-Robles Fellowship (Mexico), 2007-2008.
  • National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship, 1995-1996.
  • A Best Article Award in 1992 from The Western History Association, for “The Failed Promise of Wartime Opportunity for Mexicans in the Texas Oil Industry,” The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, 95 (January 1992): 323-50.
  • Two Best book Prizes in 1994 from the Texas Historical Commission and the Southern Historical Association, for The World of the Mexican Worker in Texas (College Station: Texas A&M University Press, 1993). 
  • Distinguished Service Awards from the Tejano Monument Project (2013), Ahora Si (with my partner Dr. Angela Valenzuela, 2013), Austin City Council (2012), Texas A&M University in Kingsville (2010, 1012), the Recovering the U.S. Hispanic Literary Heritage Recovery Project (2008), the Intercultural Development Research Associates (with Dr. Valenzuela, 2006), City of Houston (with Dr. Valenzuela, 1996), and the University of Houston (1996).

 

HIS 314K • History Of Mexican Amers In Us

38410 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 930am-1100am UTC 4.132
(also listed as MAS 316 )
show description

The reading and lecture course examines the historical development of the Mexican community in the United States since 1848, with an emphasis on the period between 1900 and the present.  The primary purpose of the course is to address time and place specific variations in the incorporation of the Mexican community as a national minority and bottom segment of the U.S. working class.  One of my central concerns is to explain two inter-related historical trends in this incorporation, steady upward mobility and unrelenting social marginalization.  I emphasize work experiences, race thinking, social relations, trans-border relations, social causes and larger themes in U.S. history such as wars, sectional differences, industrialization, reform, labor and civil rights struggles, and the development of a modern urbanized society. Also, I incorporate relevant aspects of the history of Latinos, African Americans, and Mexico.

Texts:

Manuel G. Gonzales, Mexicanos, A History of Mexicans in the US (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1999).

Angela Valenzuela, “The Drought of Understanding and the Hummingbird Spirit,” Unpublished essay in my possession.

Emilio Zamora, Claiming Rights and Righting Wrongs in Texas, Mexican Workers and Job Politics during WWII (College Station: Texas A&M University Press, 2009).

Emilio Zamora, “Guide for Writing Family History Research Paper.

Grading:

Mid-term examination (20%),

Final examination (20%),

Research paper (30%),

Four chapter reports (20%)

Film report (10%).

HIS 350R • Mexican Amers In Texas History

38678 • Spring 2015
Meets TH 330pm-630pm WEL 3.260
show description

This seminar will introduce students to the historical experience of Mexican-origin persons in Texas, with reading and research assignments involving basic texts, as well as archival materials at the Nettie Lee Benson Latin American Collection, the Dolph Briscoe Center for American History, and the EBSCO-Arte Público Hispanic Historical Collection (Digitized Series 1 and 2) at the University of Texas at Austin.  Our major concern will be to explain how, under what circumstances, and with what consequences Mexican-origin persons and communities from Texas were incorporated into the socio-economy of the United States.  The first half of the course will be dedicated to readings and class discussions that will allow the students to explore important themes, including immigration, diplomatic and ethnic relations, organized labor, and equal rights movements.  The approach to the readings will be comparative, trans-regional, and transnational, that is, the course will focus on Mexicans in Texas but will cast a wide net to include the larger Latino community and African Americans, as well as trans-border relations between Mexican and Indigenous communities.

The second half of the course will learn about the rich archival materials on Mexican American history and the analytical frameworks and research methodologies that the authors of our texts have used in selecting and interpreting the records.  This will involve visits to the archives, presentations by the University of Texas library staff on the archival materials, the selection of at least five records utilized by one of authors, and the preparation of a paper that provides a history of the books and a critical evaluation of the use of archival records by the authors.  The students will be closely supervised in the examination of the records and the preparation of an oral presentation and a research paper.

Required Readings:

Ignacio M. Garcia, United We Win: The Rise and Fall of La Raza Unida Party. Tucson: University of Arizona Mexican American Studies Research Center, 1989.

David Montejano. Anglos and Mexicans in the Making of Texas, 1836-1986. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1987.

Guadalupe San Miguel, Jr., "Let All of Them Take Heed": Mexican Americans and the Campaign for Educational Equality in Texas. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1987.

Assignments and Requirements

Students will be required to attend class regularly and participate in class discussions.

During the first half of the course, the students will be expected to keep up with the reading assignments from our texts (approximately four chapters from each text) and prepare a three-page report on each of the texts.  Each report will be worth 15 points, for a maximum of 45 points in the course.

During the last half of the course, the students will be introduced to archival collections with relevance to the history of Mexicans in Texas.  The students will be expected to visit and become familiarize with a particular archival collection and prepare a 15-minute oral presentation on the history, general contents, and strengths/limitations of the collection.  This assignment will be worth 20 points.

The student will also be responsible for preparing a 20-page research paper based on an examination of least five archival records that address a specific theme, event, or historical figure and their interpretative use by one of the authors of our texts.  The paper will have a maximum value of 35 points.

HIS 314K • History Of Mexican Amers In Us

39295 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 930am-1100am BUR 208
(also listed as MAS 316 )
show description

The reading and lecture course examines the historical development of the Mexican community in the United States since 1848, with an emphasis on the period between 1900 and the present.  The primary purpose of the course is to address time and place specific variations in the incorporation of the Mexican community as a national minority and bottom segment of the U.S. working class.  One of my central concerns is to explain two inter-related historical trends in this incorporation, steady upward mobility and unrelenting social marginalization.  I emphasize work experiences, race thinking, social relations, trans-border relations, social causes and larger themes in U.S. history such as wars, sectional differences, industrialization, reform, labor and civil rights struggles, and the development of a modern urbanized society. Also, I incorporate relevant aspects of the history of Latinos, African Americans, and Mexico.

 

Texts:

Manuel G. Gonzales, Mexicanos, A History of Mexicans in the US (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1999).

Angela Valenzuela, “The Drought of Understanding and the Hummingbird Spirit,” Unpublished essay in my possession.

Emilio Zamora, Claiming Rights and Righting Wrongs in Texas, Mexican Workers and Job Politics during WWII (College Station: Texas A&M University Press, 2009).

Emilio Zamora, “Guide for Writing Family History Research Paper.

 

Grading:

Mid-term examination (25%),

Final examination (25%),

Research paper (30%),

Two chapter reports (10%)

Film report (10%).

HIS 320R • Texas, 1914 To The Present

39495 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm BUR 208
(also listed as MAS 374, URB 353 )
show description

The reading and lecture course surveys change and continuity in the history of Texas within the context of U.S. history and Mexico-U.S. relations.  Special attention is given to Mexico-U.S. relations, politics and social relations between 1900 and 1970, as well as the home front experience of Texans during the Second World War.  The overriding theme is the incorporation of Texas into the national socio-economy from the state’s early “colonized” status to its modern position as a fully integrated part of the nation.  The course is organized around our readings.  The De la Teja/Marks/Tyler text provides a synthesis of Texas history while the Zamora text provides a closer examination of home front experiences.  The two chapters from the Campbell book will serve as a basis for an examination of the post-war period extending into 2001.

            Three semester hours of Texas history may be substituted for half of the American history requirement.  Course materials, including a copy of my resume, this syllabus, lecture notes, bibliographies, and notes on interviewing techniques, will be available on Blackboard (http://courses.utexas.edu), UT’s course management site.  Call the ITS help desk (475-9400) if you have problems accessing the site.

Texts:

Randolph B. Campbell, Chapter 16, “Modern Texas, 1971-2001,” In Gone To Texas, A History of the Lone Star Stateby Randolph B. Campbell (New York: Oxford University Press, 2003): 438-67.

Jesús de la Teja, Paula Marks, and Ron Tyler, Texas, Crossroads of North America (New York: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2004).

Emilio Zamora, Claiming Rights and Righting Wrongs in Texas, Mexican Workers and Job Politics during WWII(College Station: Texas A&M University Press, 2009).

 Grading:

Research paper (35%), 5 chapter reports (25%), and 4 film reports (40%).

HIS 314K • History Of Mexican Amers In Us

39605 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 930am-1100am BUR 208
(also listed as MAS 316 )
show description

The reading and lecture course examines the historical development of the Mexican community in the United States since 1848, with an emphasis on the period between 1900 and the present.  The primary purpose of the course is to address time and place specific variations in the incorporation of the Mexican community as a national minority and bottom segment of the U.S. working class.  One of my central concerns is to explain two inter-related historical trends in this incorporation, steady upward mobility and unrelenting social marginalization.  I emphasize work experiences, race thinking, social relations, trans-border relations, social causes and larger themes in U.S. history such as wars, sectional differences, industrialization, reform, labor and civil rights struggles, and the development of a modern urbanized society. Also, I incorporate relevant aspects of the history of Latinos, African Americans, and Mexico.

Texts:

Manuel G. Gonzales, Mexicanos, A History of Mexicans in the US (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1999). Angela Valenzuela, “The Drought of Understanding and the Hummingbird Spirit,” Unpublished essay in my possession.

Emilio Zamora, Claiming Rights and Righting Wrongs in Texas, Mexican Workers and Job Politics during WWII (College Station: Texas A&M University Press, 2009).

Emilio Zamora, “Guide for Writing Family History Research Paper.

Grading:

Mid-term examination (25%),

Final examination (25%),

Research paper (30%),

Two chapter reports (10%)

Film report (10%).

HIS 320R • Texas, 1914 To The Present

39710 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm BUR 208
(also listed as MAS 374, URB 353 )
show description

The reading and lecture course surveys change and continuity in the history of Texas within the context of U.S. history and Mexico-U.S. relations.  Special attention is given to Mexico-U.S. relations, politics and social relations between 1900 and 1970, as well as the home front experience of Texans during the Second World War.  The overriding theme is the incorporation of Texas into the national socio-economy from the state’s early “colonized” status to its modern position as a fully integrated part of the nation.  The course is organized around our readings.  The De la Teja/Marks/Tyler text provides a synthesis of Texas history while the Zamora text provides a closer examination of home front experiences.  The two chapters from the Campbell book will serve as a basis for an examination of the post-war period extending into 2001.

Three semester hours of Texas history may be substituted for half of the American history requirement.  Course materials, including a copy of my resume, this syllabus, lecture notes, bibliographies, and notes on interviewing techniques, will be available on Blackboard (http://courses.utexas.edu), UT’s course management site.  Call the ITS help desk (475-9400) if you have problems accessing the site.

 

Texts:

Randolph B. Campbell, Chapter 16, “Modern Texas, 1971-2001,” In Gone To Texas, A History of the Lone Star Stateby Randolph B. Campbell (New York: Oxford University Press, 2003): 438-67.

Jesús de la Teja, Paula Marks, and Ron Tyler, Texas, Crossroads of North America (New York: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2004).

Emilio Zamora, Claiming Rights and Righting Wrongs in Texas, Mexican Workers and Job Politics during WWII(College Station: Texas A&M University Press, 2009).

 

Grading:

Research paper (35%), 5 chapter reports (25%), and 4 film reports (40%).

HIS 314K • History Of Mexican Amers In Us

39295 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 930am-1100am UTC 4.134
(also listed as MAS 316 )
show description

The lecture course examines the historical development of the Mexican community in the United States since 1848.  The primary intent of the course is to describe and explain time and place specific variations in the socio-cultural incorporation of the Mexican community as a national minority and bottom segment of the U.S. working class.  Within this experience of incorporation, I will emphasize the following: Texas, inequality, trans-border experiences, migrations, social struggles, identity, and the process of historical production.  Also, I will treat Mexican American history within the context of U.S., Latino, and Mexico history and, whenever possible, relate it to African American history. 

HIS 392 • Oral Hist: Theory And Practice

39895 • Spring 2013
Meets T 200pm-500pm GAR 1.122
(also listed as MAS 392 )
show description

Course Description:

The seminar will address the method and theory of oral history, and provide students an opportunity to read and discuss important written materials, conduct oral history interviews, analyze their interviewing experiences and findings, and prepare an oral history paper.  Selected readings will provide a basis for understanding the method of oral history, evaluating oral narratives, and preparing oral history projects.  Three sets of relationships that shape oral narratives will frame the general discussion in the class: relationships between words, ideas and accounts embedded in the narratives; relationships between the interviewers and the informants; and relationships between the informants’ recollections and their assessments of past and contemporary situations.

The course will involve extensive reading, research project planning and the implementation of an oral history.The readings are meant to provide the students the necessary methodological and conceptual grounding for planning and implementing the research project.  At least five meetings will be devoted to the readings of the texts, with at least two students leading the discussion for each book.  Everyone will be expected to prepare a report on selected essays from each of the books, and participate in the discussion.  Subsequent class meetings will be devoted to planning the research project and reporting on the progress and the results of the research papers.

            Course materials, including a copy of my resume, the syllabus, lecture notes, bibliographies, and notes on interviewing techniques will be available on Blackboard (http://courses.utexas.edu), UT’s course management site.  Call the ITS help desk (475-9400) if you have problems accessing the site.

Requirements:

Five Book Reports (3-5 pages each) and corresponding oral reports that address important themes in the readings (such as memory, shared authorship, the interview, and ethical issues in interviewing): The reports will represent 50 points in a 100-point scale.   Submission deadlines, noted below, allow for the students to benefit from class discussions on the readings.  Two student volunteers will lead each week’s discussions of the readings.  Each report should focus on at least three chapters or essays in each book that have relevance to the student’s research goals.  Students should use the readings in their preparation of their research plans and papers.  The readings, in other words, offer the necessary bibliographic information for the preparation of the research plan and a bibliography for the paper.

A 5-10 page research plan and corresponding oral report: The plan should contain a purpose statement that notes a central research problem and corresponding research questions, issues and hypothesis, a statement on how oral history will help reach research goals and expand knowledge, a review of the pertinent literature, biographies of persons to be interviewed, interviewing protocols, and a statement of expected findings and their significance.  The plan will guide the research activities and undergo changes as the project progresses.  The deadline for a draft of the plan is March 22 and the deadline for the final draft is May 3.  The plan will be worth 10 points.

A 12-15-page oral history paper (based on at least two, 2-hour semi-structured interviews, as well as preliminary interviews or conversations with the informants) that addresses the interviewing process and findings: Students should engage the assigned readings as models for their papers.  The paper will be worth 40 points.

Readings and course schedule will be available during our first class meeting.

HIS 314K • History Of Mexican Amers In Us

39125 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm BUR 208
(also listed as MAS 316 )
show description

This lecture course examines the historical development of the Mexican community in the United States since 1848.  The primary intent of the course is to describe and explain time and place specific variations in the socio-cultural incorporation of the Mexican community as a national minority and bottom segment of the U.S. working class.  Within this experience of incorporation, I will emphasize the following: Texas, inequality, trans-border experiences, migrations, social struggles, identity, and the process of historical production.  Also, I will treat Mexican American history within the context of U.S., Latino, and Mexico history and, whenever possible, relate it to African American history. 

 

Grading

Mid-term examination (20%), a final examination (20%), a research report (20%), five chapter reports (25%), and three film reports (15%).

 

Texts

 

Manuel G. Gonzales, Mexicanos, A History of Mexicans in the US (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1999).

Hector Tobar, Translation Nation (New York: Riverhead Books, 2005).

Emilio Zamora, Claiming Rights and Righting Wrongs in Texas, Mexican Workers and Job Politics during WWII (College Station: Texas A&M University Press, 2009).

HIS 320R • Texas, 1914 To The Present

39255 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 930am-1100am GAR 0.102
(also listed as MAS 374, URB 353 )
show description

This reading and lecture course surveys change and continuity in the history of Texas within the context of U.S. history, southern history, and Mexico-U.S. relations.  The primary purpose of the course is to understand the incorporation of Texas into the national socio-economy from the state’s early “colonized” status to its “modern” position.  The course will offer a general survey of Texas history and focus on the home front of the Second World War and the desegregation of Mansfield High School in the 1950.   This will allow me to underscore an underlying argument in the course—Texas history traverses regional and national borders.  My references to world events, national politics, the South, and Mexico will serve the same purpose.  The De la Teja/Marks/Tyler text and the Campbell essays provide a synthesis of Texas history while the Zamora and Ladino texts provided closer examinations of four central themes—the Second World War, hemispheric relations, labor, and politics at mid-century.

Grading

Two examinations (40%), 5 chapter reports (30%), 2 film reports (20%), and a report based on two related topics appearing in the Texas Handbook Online (10%)

 

Readings

Randolph B. Campbell, Ed., Chapter 16, “Modern Texas, 1971-2001,” In Gone To Texas, A History of the Lone Star State (New York: Oxford University Press, 2003): 438-67.  An electronic copy of Campbell’s book—with Chapter 16—is available at the Perry-Castañeda Library.

Jesús de la Teja, Paula Marks, and Ron Tyler, Texas, Crossroads of North America (New York: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2004).  A copy of the book will be available on a two-hour reserve basis at the Perry-Castañeda Library.

Emilio Zamora, Claiming Rights and Righting Wrongs in Texas, Mexican Workers and Job Politics during WWII (College Station: Texas A&M University Press, 2009).  A copy of the book is available on a two-hour reserve basis at the Perry-Castañeda Library.

Robyn Duff Ladino, Desegregating Texas Schools; Eisenhower, Shivers, and the Crisis at Mansfield High (Austin: University of Texas Press, 1996).  An electronic copy of this book is also available at our undergraduate library.

HIS 320R • Texas, 1914 To The Present

39260 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 800am-930am GAR 0.102
(also listed as MAS 374, URB 353 )
show description

Course Description

            The reading and lecture course surveys change and continuity in the history of Texas within the context of U.S. history and Mexico-U.S. relations.  Special attention is given to Mexico-U.S. relations, politics and social relations between 1900 and 1970, as well as the home front experience of Texans during the Second World War.  The overriding theme is the incorporation of Texas into the national socio-economy from the state’s early “colonized” status to its modern position as a fully integrated part of the nation.  The course is organized around our readings.  The De la Teja/Marks/Tyler text provides a synthesis of Texas history while the Zamora text provides a closer examination of home front experiences.  The two chapters from the Campbell book will serve as a basis for an examination of the post-war period extending into 2001.

            Three semester hours of Texas history may be substituted for half of the American history requirement.  Course materials, including a copy of my resume, this syllabus, lecture notes, bibliographies, and notes on interviewing techniques, will be available on Blackboard (http://courses.utexas.edu), UT’s course management site.  Call the ITS help desk (475-9400) if you have problems accessing the site.

Course Requirements

Your course grade will be based on a research paper (35%), 5 chapter reports (25%), and 4 film reports (40%).  Your final grade will be computed cumulatively.  I will discuss the requirements more fully in class.

Chapter Reports.  You will be expected to submit brief reports on 6 of the 9 assigned chapters.  The reports should include two-sentence responses for each of the following questions: What is the issue or point that the author is explaining or arguing?  How does he go about doing this?  How effective is his explanation or argument? Each report will be worth 5 points and will be due on the meeting after the chapter is assigned.  

Film Reports.  Prepare a two-page report on each of the four assigned films.  You can earn as many as 10 points for each of them.  The reports should address the following: the overall purpose of the film, the supportive arguments and techniques that the film maker uses, and the relevance of the film to the course content.  The film reports will be due on the class meeting after the showing of each of the films.  

Research Paper.  You will be expected to write a 10-page history of your family based on at least two interviews and two overarching themes (for example, immigration, work experiences, identity, gender roles) spanning three generations or more.  You will be required to write your paper in three parts.  The first installment will be a 2-3 planning document in which you report on the purpose of your paper, the interviews that you will conduct, and the themes that you will address.  The planning document is worth 5 points.   The second installment,  will be a draft of the introduction and a preliminary narrative of your paper’s themes.  This part will be worth 15 points.  The final installment—worth 15 points—will incorporate the first two parts into a final draft of the paper that will include a conclusion and a family tree.  

Attendance.  More than three unexcused absences will result in a five-point deduction on the final grade, and one more point deduction for every class missed after the three unexcused absences.  Also, you are expected to be on time for class and to remain in the classroom for the duration of the class.  Teaching assistants will be checking attendance and I will reward students who attend regularly (with an allowance of two unexcused absence) with one or two points if this can help you reach a higher letter grade for the course.

Readings

Randolph B. Campbell, Chapter 16, “Modern Texas, 1971-2001,” In Gone To Texas, A History of the Lone Star Stateby Randolph B. Campbell (New York: Oxford University Press, 2003): 438-67.  Chapters 15 and 16 can be found in the electronic copy of the book, available at the Perry-Castañeda Library.

Jesús de la Teja, Paula Marks, and Ron Tyler, Texas, Crossroads of North America (New York: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2004).  A copy of the book is available on a two-hour reserve basis at the Perry-Castañeda Library.

Emilio Zamora, Claiming Rights and Righting Wrongs in Texas, Mexican Workers and Job Politics during WWII(College Station: Texas A&M University Press, 2009).  A copy of the book is available on a two-hour reserve basis at the Perry-Castañeda Library.

Films

Border Bandits

The Life and Times of Rosie the Riveter

When I Rise

Hill Country

HIS 314K • History Of Mexican Amers In Us

39110 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 800am-930am UTC 4.132
(also listed as MAS 316 )
show description

The reading and lecture course examines the historical development of the Mexican community in the United States since 1848, with an emphasis on the period between 1900 and the present.  The primary purpose of the course is to address time and place specific variations in the incorporation of the Mexican community as a national minority and bottom segment of the U.S. working class.  One of my central concerns is to explain two inter-related historical trends in this incorporation, steady upward mobility and unrelenting social marginalization.  I emphasize work experiences, race thinking, social relations, trans-border relations, social causes and larger themes in U.S. history such as wars, sectional differences, industrialization, reform, labor and civil rights struggles, and the development of a modern urbanized society. Also, I incorporate relevant aspects of the history of Latinos, African Americans, and Mexico. 

Textbooks

Manuel G. Gonzales, Mexicanos, A History of Mexicans in the US (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1999).  A copy of the book is available on a two-hour reserve basis at the PCL.

Hector Tobar, Translation Nation (New York: Riverhead Books, 2005). A copy of the book is available on a two-hour reserve basis at the PCL.

Emilio Zamora, Claiming Rights and Righting Wrongs in Texas, Mexican Workers and Job Politics during WWII (College Station: Texas A&M University Press, 2009).  A copy of the book is available on a two-hour reserve basis at the PCL.

 

Films

“A Medal for Benny,” 1945.  Paramount Pictures.

“Taking Back the Schools,” Part 3 of Chicano! History of the Mexican American Civil Rights Movement, 1996.           

Course Requirements

Your course grade will be based on eight chapter reports (40%), three film reports (30%), and a family history paper (30%).  I will provide added guidance on the preparation of the reports in class.  We will post your scores as promptly as possible.  Make sure to stay on schedule since make-up or extra credit work will not be accepted. 

HIS 320R • Texas, 1914 To The Present

39510 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm UTC 3.112
(also listed as MAS 374, URB 353 )
show description

Course Description

            The reading and lecture course surveys change and continuity in the history of Texas within the context of U.S. history and Mexico-U.S. relations.  Special attention is given to Mexico-U.S. relations, politics and social relations between 1900 and 1970, as well as the home front experience of Texans during the Second World War.  The overriding theme is the incorporation of Texas into the national socio-economy from the state’s early “colonized” status to its modern position as a fully integrated part of the nation.  The course is organized around our readings.  The De la Teja/Marks/Tyler text provides a synthesis of Texas history while the Zamora text provides a closer examination of home front experiences.  The two chapters from the Campbell book will serve as a basis for an examination of the post-war period extending into 2001.

            Three semester hours of Texas history may be substituted for half of the American history requirement.  Course materials, including a copy of my resume, this syllabus, lecture notes, bibliographies, and notes on interviewing techniques, will be available on Blackboard (http://courses.utexas.edu), UT’s course management site.  Call the ITS help desk (475-9400) if you have problems accessing the site.

Course Requirements

Your course grade will be based on a research paper (35%), 5 chapter reports (25%), and 4 film reports (40%).  Your final grade will be computed cumulatively.  I will discuss the requirements more fully in class.

Chapter Reports.  You will be expected to submit brief reports on 6 of the 9 assigned chapters.  The reports should include two-sentence responses for each of the following questions: What is the issue or point that the author is explaining or arguing?  How does he go about doing this?  How effective is his explanation or argument? Each report will be worth 5 points and will be due on the meeting after the chapter is assigned.  

Film Reports.  Prepare a two-page report on each of the four assigned films.  You can earn as many as 10 points for each of them.  The reports should address the following: the overall purpose of the film, the supportive arguments and techniques that the film maker uses, and the relevance of the film to the course content.  The film reports will be due on the class meeting after the showing of each of the films.  

Research Paper.  You will be expected to write a 10-page history of your family based on at least two interviews and two overarching themes (for example, immigration, work experiences, identity, gender roles) spanning three generations or more.  You will be required to write your paper in three parts.  The first installment will be a 2-3 planning document in which you report on the purpose of your paper, the interviews that you will conduct, and the themes that you will address.  The planning document is worth 5 points.   The second installment,  will be a draft of the introduction and a preliminary narrative of your paper’s themes.  This part will be worth 15 points.  The final installment—worth 15 points—will incorporate the first two parts into a final draft of the paper that will include a conclusion and a family tree.  

Attendance.  More than three unexcused absences will result in a five-point deduction on the final grade, and one more point deduction for every class missed after the three unexcused absences.  Also, you are expected to be on time for class and to remain in the classroom for the duration of the class.  Teaching assistants will be checking attendance and I will reward students who attend regularly (with an allowance of two unexcused absence) with one or two points if this can help you reach a higher letter grade for the course.

Readings

Randolph B. Campbell, Chapter 16, “Modern Texas, 1971-2001,” In Gone To Texas, A History of the Lone Star Stateby Randolph B. Campbell (New York: Oxford University Press, 2003): 438-67.  Chapters 15 and 16 can be found in the electronic copy of the book, available at the Perry-Castañeda Library.

Jesús de la Teja, Paula Marks, and Ron Tyler, Texas, Crossroads of North America (New York: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2004).  A copy of the book is available on a two-hour reserve basis at the Perry-Castañeda Library.

Emilio Zamora, Claiming Rights and Righting Wrongs in Texas, Mexican Workers and Job Politics during WWII(College Station: Texas A&M University Press, 2009).  A copy of the book is available on a two-hour reserve basis at the Perry-Castañeda Library.

Films

Border Bandits

The Life and Times of Rosie the Riveter

When I Rise

Hill Country

HIS 350L • Creat & Interp Oral Narratives

39640 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am GAR 2.128
show description

HIS 350L

The course will introduce students to the theory and practice of oral history and oral narratives.  The course will also provide students an opportunity to organize an oral history project, conduct oral history interviews, transcribe portions of the interviews and analyze their interviewing experiences and findings.  Students will expound on the readings and local (Austin) field experiences on the basis of discussions, oral reports and written assignments throughout the semester.

Texts

Frisch, Michael. A Shared Authority: Essays on the Craft and Meaning of Oral and Public History. Albany: State University of New York Press, 1990.

Perks, Robert and Alistair Thomson. The Oral History Reader. New York: Routledge, 1998.

Thompson, Paul. The Voice of the Past: Oral History. New York: Oxford University Press, 1988.

Trouillot, Michel-Rolph. Silencing the Past; Power and the Production of History. Boston: Beacon Press, 1995.

 

This course contains a Writing flag.

 

Grading

Dr. Zamora will offer short lectures.  The course grade will be based on class discussion (15%), three reading  (chapters/articles) reports (15%), an oral history project planning report (15%), an interviewing report (15%), a draft of a portion of the oral history paper (15%), a final 15-page oral history paper (25%).

HIS 314K • History Of Mexican Amers In Us

39035 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 1000am-1100am UTC 4.132
(also listed as MAS 316 )
show description

HISTORY OF MEXICAN AMERICANS IN THE UNITED STATES
314K (39035), Also MAS 316 (35725)
Fall 2010

Instructor: Emilio Zamora
Garrison 2.104B, 475-8706 (office), 739-0168 (cell)
E.zamora@mail.utexas.edu

Office Hours: Wed: 11-12, Thurs: 12:30-1 and by appointment

Course Description

The reading and lecture course examines the historical development of the Mexican community in the United States since 1848, with an emphasis on the period between 1900 and the present.  The primary purpose of the course is to address time and place-specific variations in the incorporation of the Mexican population as a national minority and bottom segment of the U.S. working class.  One of my major objectives is to explain two inter-related historical trends in this incorporation—steady upward mobility and unrelenting social marginalization.  We will survey the history with lectures and readings from our two texts, as well as with films.  I will assign writing exercises, require attendance, and encourage discussion.

Course materials, including a copy of my resume, the syllabus, and lecture (daily) notes will be posted e on Blackboard, UT’s course management site.  Call the ITS help desk (475-9400) if you have questions about Blackboard.

Course Requirements

            Your course grade will be based on eight chapter reports (40%), three film reports (30%), and a family history paper (30%).  I will provide added guidance on the preparation of the reports in class.  We will post your scores as promptly as possible.  Make sure to stay on schedule since make-up or extra credit work will not be accepted. 

Chapter Reports.  I have assigned 10 ten chapters from three books listed below.  You can earn as many as 5 points for each of the reports on 8 of these assigned chapters.  The reports should provide two-sentence responses to the following questions: What is the issue or point that the author is explaining or arguing?  How does the author do this?  How effective is the author’s explanation or argument?  Each report will be due at the end of the class meeting after the chapter has been assigned (If you select Chapter 5 from Gonzalez, for instance, you should submit your report on September 8).

 Film Reports.  Students can earn a maximum of 10 points for each of the 1-2 page reports on three films that we will view in class.  The reports should address the overall purpose of the film, the supportive arguments and techniques that the film maker uses, and the relevance of the film to the course content.  Each report will be due on the class meeting after the complete screening of the film.  For instance, Border Bandits will be viewed on September 17 and 20 and the report will be submitted on September 22.

Family History Paper.  You will be expected to write a 10-page history of your family based on at least two interviews and two overarching themes (for example, immigration, work experiences, identity) spanning three generations or more.  You will be required to write your paper in three parts.  The first one will be a 2-3 planning document in which you report on the purpose of your paper, the interviews that you will conduct, and the themes that you will address.  The planning document is worth 5 points; it is due on September 24.   The second part, due on October 15, will be a draft of the introduction and a preliminary narrative of your paper’s themes.  This part will be worth 10 points.  The last part—worth 15 points—will incorporate the first two parts and expand the narrative into a final draft of the paper.  The final paper is due on December 1.

I will provide instructions on interviewing and the writing of the three installments.  I can provide an optional research assignment if students are unable to prepare a family history paper.

Attendance.  Three unexcused absences will result in a five-point deduction on the final grade, and one added point deduction for each absence after the three unexcused absences.  Also, you are expected to be on time for class and to remain in the classroom for the duration of the class.  Teaching assistants will be checking attendance and I will reward students who attend regularly (with an allowance of two unexcused absence) with one or two points if this can help them reach the next higher letter grade for the course.

Grading

I will use the following grading scale:

            A            93-100
            A-            90-92
            B+            87-8
            B            83-86
            B-            80-82
            C+            77-79
            C            73-76
            C-            70-72
            D+            67-69
            D            63-66
            D-            60-62
            F            59 and Below

Readings

Manuel G. Gonzales, Mexicanos, A History of Mexicans in the US (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1999).  A copy of the book is available on a two-hour reserve basis at the Perry-Castañeda Library (Chapters 5, 6, 7, 8, 9).

Emilio Zamora, Claiming Rights and Righting Wrongs in Texas, Mexican Workers and Job Politics during WWII (College Station: Texas A&M University Press, 2009).  Two copies of the book are available on a two-hour reserve basis at the Perry-Castañeda Library (Chapters 3, 4, 5, 6).

Emilio Zamora, “Voluntary Organizations and the Ethic of Mutuality,” pp. 86-109, In The World of the Mexican Worker in Texas (College Station: Texas A&M University Press, 1993).  An electronic copy of the book is available at the Perry-Castañeda Library (Chapter 4).

Emilio Zamora, “Texas Occupational Distribution and Relative Concentration of Mexicans, 1930-1970.” I will post the table will be posted on Blackboard.

Films
Border Bandits, 2009
A Class Apart, 2009
Taking Back the Schools, 1996

Schedule

I will initiate the classes with lectures or general remarks.  The lectures will follow outlined notes that I will post on Blackboard.  My remarks will serve as points of departure in our class discussions.  The reading assignments require that you come to the following class meeting prepared to discuss them.  The assignment that I note for September 3 (Chapter 5 from Gonzales’ book), for instance, means that you should have done the reading by the subsequent class meeting, on September 8.

Part I. Introduction

8-25            Course Description, Requirements, and Objectives

Assignment: Gonzalez, Introduction/Zamora, Forward and Introduction (Report is not required on these reading assignments)

I will discuss the texts, course schedule, requirements, expectations, terms, and concepts.  I will also address the primary purpose of the course, that is, to examine the way Mexicans have been incorporated into American society and the consequences of this social incorporation.  My primary concern will be to explain how Mexicans have undergone upward occupational and social mobility at the same time that they have remained marginalized since the middle 1800s.

8-27            Explanations of Assignments and Requirements

Discussion of reading assignments and chapter summaries, film reports, and family history papers

Part II. The Conquest Generation, 1848-1900

8-30            Pre-20th Century Review: Independent Mexico, U.S. Expansionism, and Wars

An expansionist United States reached the current Southwest as Spanish colonial rule was coming to an end between 1810 and 1821.  Mexico’s independence movement left it vulnerable to U.S. expansionism, characterized by the Texas insurrection (1835-36) and the Mexico-U.S. war (1846-48).  The result included Mexico’s loss of more than one-half of its territory, the absorption of the “Mexican cession” into a politically charged environment in the United States, and the incorporation of Mexicans as a territorial minority.  I will share selected interpretations of these events with reference to works by Carey McWilliams (North From Mexico), Juan Gómez-Quiñones (Roots of Chicano Politics), and Mario García (Mexican Americans).

9-1            Class discussion

            This will be the first of several times that I will set aside for the class to discuss the readings and my observations.  I will do this by creating small discussion groups and giving you around ten minutes to discuss specific topics.  Each group will select an individual to report on their deliberations.

9-3            The Territorial, Political, and Economic Incorporation of the Annexed Territories

            Assignment: Gonzales, Chapter 5

            We will continue the discussion initiated during the previous class meetings, paying closer attention to the consequences of the wars and military pacification to selected regions and communities.  I will use Albert Camarillo’s study of Santa Barbara (Chicanos in a Changing Society) to illustrate how military occupation, racial conflict, and the arrival of Anglos introduced important social and political changes.  I will use his concepts of proletarianization and barrioization to explain social marginalization and community building.

9-8            Class discussion

Part III. The Mexicanist Generation, 1900-1930s

9-10            Introduction, 1900-1930

Unequal and racialized social relations emerged with the economic incorporation of the Southwest.  Industrialization included the development of railroads, mining, agriculture (ranching and farming), urban based industries like construction, and a demand for low-wage Mexican labor.  The racial ideas that emerged “naturally” joined with imported antipathies directed against the “other” as well as negative ideas associated with the wars (1835-36, 1846-48) and the undeclared “low intensity” fighting of the late nineteenth century.  Studies by Montejano (Anglos and Mexicans in the Making of Texas) and Anoldo De León (They Called Them Greasers) will help us understand the role that racial ideas played in justifying and reinforcing inequality.

9-13            Class discussion

9-15            Work, Migration, and Community Building

Immigration is a central theme during the early 1900s; it includes experiences like the reserve army of Mexican labor, labor controls, and workers’ struggles as transnational social movements.  The subject of immigration also allows us to understand the unequal relations between Mexico and the United States and the emerging differences and divisions in the Mexican community.  I will use works by Carey McWilliams (North From Mexico) and Emilio Zamora (The World of the Mexican Worker in Texas).

9-17            Film: Border Bandits

9-20            Continuation of film

9-22            Film discussion

9-24            Research Plan and Family History Paper Discussion

            Submit planning document

            Assignment: Chapter 4, “Voluntary Organizations and the Ethic of Mutuality.”

9-27            Mexico, Self-organizing, and a Moralist Mexican Political Culture, I

            Organizations, especially mutual aid societies, reflected and reinforced the popular collectivist value of mutualism.  Sara Estela Ramirez, a teacher, poet, and early supporter of an anarchist-syndicalist exiled group, was a major exponent of the cultural value and her writings explain how intellectuals like her promoted mutualism, reciprocity, and even altruism to sustain different social causes.  Works by Gómez-Quiñones (Sembradores) and Zamora (The World of the Mexican Worker in Texas) will serve as points of reference.

9-29            Americanization, Political Divisions and a New Ethnic Ethos, Part I

            I will refer to three important political leaders—Emilio Flores, Clemente Idar, and José de la Luz Saenz—to demonstrate how an ethnic or Mexican American political identity emerged among Mexicans in places like Texas.  The armed revolt of 1915 in South Texas and the emergence of the moderate League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) in 1929 reflect the political distance between Mexican activists.  I will use Zamora’s The World of the Mexican Workers in Texas to address the subject of political divisions.

10-1            Americanization, Political Divisions and a New Ethnic Ethos, Part II

10-4            Class discussion

            Assignment: Gonzales, Chapter 6

10-6            The Depression Years: Hard Times, Survival, and Activism, Part I

            Mexicans were especially hard hit during the Depression.  Hard times, however, also reinforced mutualism and unity, and energized the Mexican social movement, especially the cause for workers’ rights.  A recent study by Zaragosa Vargas (Labor Rights and Civil Rights) will help us address the hard times of the Depression.

10-8            The Depression Years: Hard Times, Survival, and Activism, Part II

Part IV. The Mexican Americanist Generation, 1940s-1960s

10-11            Introduction, 1940s-1960s

            Assignments: Gonzales, Chapter 7; “Texas Occupational Distribution and Relative Concentration of Mexicans, 1930-1970.”

Mexicans, like the rest of the nation, recovered from the hard times of the Depression when the wartime demand on the economy provided them more better-paying jobs, especially in urban areas.  Mexicans, however, they did not benefit from wartime opportunities to the same extent as Anglos and Blacks.  I will refer to works by Walter Fogel (Mexican Americans in Southwest Labor Markets) and Mario Barrera (Race and Class in the Southwest), Alonso Perales (Are We Good Neighbors?) and Pauline Kibbe (Latin Americans in Texas).

10-13            Open

            “Open” means that I have not planned class activities for this date.  I am doing this to allow for instances when I may have to adjust the schedule during the semester.

10-15            Class discussion

            Submit the first draft of your paper

Assignment: Chapter 7 (the 1940s, pp. 161-75)

10-18            The preparation of Claiming Rights and Righting Wrongs in Texas

I will address the three major parts of the book, the wartime labor market, the cause for equal rights, and statist politics

            Assignment: Zamora, Chapter 3

10-20            Elevating the Mexican Cause to a Hemispheric Level

Drawing primarily from the Chapter 3 assignment, I will discuss Mexico’s decision to intervene on behalf of Mexican rights in the United States and the State Department’s resolve “to bring the Good Neighbor Policy home” and elevate racial discrimination to a point of major importance in relations between Mexico and the United States.

10-22            Class discussion

            Assignment: Zamora, Chapter 4

10-25            Energizing the Cause for Equal Rights

Assignment: Zamora, Chapter 5

Texas became a key site in testing the Good Neighbor Policy in the United States and in explaining the emergence of LULAC as the major Mexican civil rights organization in the country.

10-27            Statist Politics, the case of the USES and the FEPC

            Assignment: Zamora, Chapter 6

The case of the FEPC and the United States Employment Service demonstrates that the activist state of the 1940s promoted upward mobility and reinforced inequality.  This observation becomes more important during the post-war period as Mexican American civil rights leaders increasingly turned to government as the final arbiter in promoting equal rights.

10-29            Class discussion

            Assignment: Gonzales, Chapter 7 (the 1950s and 1960s, pp. 175-90)

11-1            The 1950s, New Strategies during the Post-War Period

Demographic changes, urbanization, and an optimism that drew inspiration from the nation’s foundational documents encouraged unionization, electoral politics, and legal challenges against discrimination and segregation.  Today, I will discuss the continuing labor cause and the emerging electoral movement for equal representation.

11-3            Film: A Class Apart

11-5            Continuation of film

11-8            Class discussion

Part V. The Recent Generation, 1960s-Present

11-10            Introduction

            Assignment: Gonzales, Chapter 8

            The Mexican community underwent significant social differentiation and pursued multiple acculturation paths.  LULAC and the American G.I. Forum practiced a form of liberal pluralism while disillusionment with persistent discrimination and inequality forecast political divisions and a bolder form of politics associated with the “Chicano Generation.

11-12            The Chicano Movement, Part I

            An examination of the major leaders—César Chavez, Reies Lopez Tijerina, Rodolfo Gonzalez, and José Angel Gutierrez—allows us to examine the major trends in the Mexican social movement.

11-15            The Chicano Movement, Part II

            I will continue the previous discussion, but will focus on the growth of the “middle class,” demographic factors, the youth, and women to explain the seeming upheaval of the 1960s and 1970s.

11-17            Film: Taking Back the Schools

11-19            Continuation of film

11-22            Film discussion

            Assignment: Gonzales, Chapter 9

11-24            Latinos and Immigration

            I will be using a recent book by Hector Tobar entitled Translation Nation to discuss the Latino community, especially its experience with immigration to the United States.

11-25, 26     Thanksgiving holiday

11-29            Future Trends

            I will be using a publication by David Hays-Bautista’s The Burden of Support: Young Latinos in an Aging Society and Steve Murdock’s “Population Change in the United States: Historical Patterns and Future Trends Affecting Education, The Labor Force and Economic Development.”  The latter will be posted for your future reference.

12-1            Submit final draft of family history paper.

12-3            Open

This course contains a Cultural Diversity flag.

HIS 320R • Texas, 1914 To The Present

39145 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm UTC 4.132
(also listed as MAS 374, URB 353 )
show description

Texas History, 1914 to the Present
HIS320R / 39145
Fall 2010

Instructor: Emilio Zamora
Garrison 2.104B, 475-8706 (office), 739-0168 (cell)
E.zamora@mail.utexas.edu

Office Hours: Wed: 10-11, Thurs: 12:30-1 and by appointment

Course Description

            The reading and lecture course surveys change and continuity in the history of Texas within the context of U.S. history and Mexico-U.S. relations.  Special attention is given to Mexico-U.S. relations, politics and social relations between 1900 and 1970, as well as the home front experience of Texans during the Second World War.  The overriding theme is the incorporation of Texas into the national socio-economy from the state’s early “colonized” status to its modern position as a fully integrated part of the nation.  The course is organized around our readings.  The De la Teja/Marks/Tyler text provides a synthesis of Texas history while the Zamora text provides a closer examination of home front experiences.  The two chapters from the Campbell book will serve as a basis for an examination of the post-war period extending into 2001.

            Three semester hours of Texas history may be substituted for half of the American history requirement.  Course materials, including a copy of my resume, this syllabus, lecture notes, bibliographies, and notes on interviewing techniques, will be available on Blackboard (http://courses.utexas.edu), UT’s course management site.  Call the ITS help desk (475-9400) if you have problems accessing the site.

Course Requirements

Your course grade will be based on a research paper (35%), 5 chapter reports (25%), and 4 film reports (40%).  Your final grade will be computed cumulatively.  I will discuss the requirements more fully in class.

Chapter Reports.  You will be expected to submit brief reports on 6 of the 9 assigned chapters.  The reports should include two-sentence responses for each of the following questions: What is the issue or point that the author is explaining or arguing?  How does he go about doing this?  How effective is his explanation or argument? Each report will be worth 5 points and will be due on the meeting after the chapter is assigned.  The report for De la Teja’s Chapter 11 (assigned on September 9), for instance, should be submitted on September 14, at the end of the class period.  The assigned chapters include: De la Teja—Chapters 11, 12, 13, 14, Zamora—Chapters 2, 3, 4, 5, Campbell—Chapters 16.  Please note that De la Teja, Chapter 12 is assigned in two parts (pp. 358-80 and 380-90) and that you can report on each separately.

Film Reports.  Prepare a two-page report on each of the four assigned films.  You can earn as many as 10 points for each of them.  The reports should address the following: the overall purpose of the film, the supportive arguments and techniques that the film maker uses, and the relevance of the film to the course content.  The film reports will be due on the class meeting after the showing of each of the films.  The report for Border Bandits, for instance, is due on September 16.

Research Paper.  You will be expected to write a 10-page history of your family based on at least two interviews and two overarching themes (for example, immigration, work experiences, identity, gender roles) spanning three generations or more.  You will be required to write your paper in three parts.  The first installment—due on September 28—will be a 2-3 planning document in which you report on the purpose of your paper, the interviews that you will conduct, and the themes that you will address.  The planning document is worth 5 points.   The second installment, due on November 2, will be a draft of the introduction and a preliminary narrative of your paper’s themes.  This part will be worth 15 points.  The final installment—worth 15 points—will incorporate the first two parts into a final draft of the paper that will include a conclusion and a family tree.  The final paper is due on December 6.

Attendance.  More than three unexcused absences will result in a five-point deduction on the final grade, and one more point deduction for every class missed after the three unexcused absences.  Also, you are expected to be on time for class and to remain in the classroom for the duration of the class.  Teaching assistants will be checking attendance and I will reward students who attend regularly (with an allowance of two unexcused absence) with one or two points if this can help you reach a higher letter grade for the course.

Grading

I will use the following grading scale:

            A            93-100
            A-            90-92
            B+            87-89
            B            83-86
            B-            80-82
            C+            77-79
            C            73-76
            C-            70-72
            D+            67-69
            D            63-66
            D-            60-62
            F            59 and Below

Readings

Randolph B. Campbell, Chapter 16, “Modern Texas, 1971-2001,” In Gone To Texas, A History of the Lone Star State by Randolph B. Campbell (New York: Oxford University Press, 2003): 438-67.  Chapters 15 and 16 can be found in the electronic copy of the book, available at the Perry-Castañeda Library.

Jesús de la Teja, Paula Marks, and Ron Tyler, Texas, Crossroads of North America (New York: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2004).  A copy of the book is available on a two-hour reserve basis at the Perry-Castañeda Library.

Emilio Zamora, Claiming Rights and Righting Wrongs in Texas, Mexican Workers and Job Politics during WWII (College Station: Texas A&M University Press, 2009).  A copy of the book is available on a two-hour reserve basis at the Perry-Castañeda Library.

Films

Border Bandits

The Life and Times of Rosie the Riveter

When I Rise

Hill Country

Schedule

I will initiate the classes with general remarks or lectures based on outlined notes that I will post on Blackboard prior to each class meeting.  These remarks or lectures are noted as topics in the schedule.  The reading assignments correspond to the remarks or lectures scheduled for the next class meeting.  The topic “Summary Discussion” and the “Review for Examination” will allow us to take stock of the material that we will have read and discussed.

 

8-26            Course Introduction

            Texts, course schedule, requirements, and expectations in the course.           

8-31            The Family History Paper

            The major writing assignment in the course requires special attention.  I will post helpful research and writing suggestions in Blackboard and devote this class period to a discussion of the assignment

9-2            Background to the Twentieth Century, 1836-1900

Assignment: De la Teja, “Preface” and Chapter 11

My purpose today and September 9 is to introduce the twentieth century with a survey of Texas history during the last half of the twentieth century.  I will address the early phase of incorporation with an emphasis on the wars, the cotton culture, industrialization, demography, social relations, and early reform.

9-7            Early Twentieth Century, 1900-1930, I

I will provide a general survey of Texas history during the early 1900s.               Our attention will be on social reform, the advent of farming, and labor organizing as a feature of the emerging urban setting.

9-9            Early Twentieth Century, 1900-1930, II

            I will lecture on mutuality as a cultural value that explains many of the social causes of the early 1900s.

9-14            Film: Border Bandits

9-16            Film Discussion

Assignment: De la Teja, Chapter 12, pp. 358-80

            Submit film report #1

9-21            The Great Depression I

            I will offer general observations on the economic crisis, the federal government’s efforts at relief, recovery and reform, and the political issues that an activist state generated in Texas.

9-23            The Great Depression II

            Part of the class will be devoted to a class discussion

9-28            Submit and discuss planning document for research paper

Assignment: De la Teja, Chapter 12, pp. 380-90

9-30            Wartime Experiences

            I will be primarily concerned with describing in general terms the war and home front experiences in Texas

            Assignment: Zamora, Chapter 2

10-5             Wartime Recovery

I will discuss the expansion of the economy, recovery experiences, and the government’s role in ameliorating and reinforcing social inequalities.

10-7            Film: The Life and Times of Rosie the Riveter

10-12            Film Discussion

Assignment: Zamora, Chapter 3

Submit film report #2

10-14            The Good Neighbor Policy, Mexico, and Texas

Drawing on Chapter 3, I will discuss how Mexico elevated race to a level of hemispheric importance and influenced the State Department to promote improved ethnic relations in Texas

10-19            Submit and discuss the first installment of your research paper

Assignment: Zamora, Chapter 4

10-21            Invigorating Social Causes

            Assignment: Zamora, Chapter 5

10-26            The USES and the FEPC

            The depression and the Second World War gave rise to an elaborate governmental apparatus that played a central role in regulating the economy and social relations.  The state, consequently, became a key arbiter as well as a source of conflict in politics.  Today, I wish to underscore that the state is not a monolithic force, but an institution that responds to multiple constituencies with different policy initiatives. 

10-28            Politics in the 1940s, I

            I will discuss conservative rule in Texas with a focus on Governor Coke Stevenson, a state’s rights advocate and proponent of “small government”.

11-2            Submit and discuss second installment of your research paper

11-3            Departmental Screening: When I Rise

            Wednesday, 6-8 pm, Garrison 0.102.  The Department of History is screening this film and I am making use of the opportunity to assign it for viewing outside our classroom

11-4            Discussion of film

            Submit film report #3

Assignment: De la Teja, Chapter 13

11-9            I will address the views of key authors—V. O. Key, Chandler Davidson, and David Montejano to explain the demise of Jim Crowism.

11-11            I’ll be attending a conference today, we won’t hold class

            Assignment: Campbell, Chapter 16

11-16            Economic Growth and Expansion, The Driving Force

            My major point today is that economic growth and expansion and the accompanying increase and concentration of the population in urban centers like Dallas, Houston, and San Antonio helps to explain the liberal challenge against “establishment” rule.

11-18            Film: Hill Country

11-23            Discussion of film

            Submit film report #4

11-25            Thanksgiving Holiday

11-30            Discussion of Papers

12-2            Discussion of Papers

12-6            Submit an electronic copy of your completed research paper

This course contains a Cultural Diversity flag.

HIS 314K • History Of Mexican Amers In Us

84965 • Summer 2010
Meets MTWTHF 830am-1000am MEZ 1.306
(also listed as MAS 316 )
show description

The reading, lecture, and film course examines the historical development of the Mexican community in the United States since 1848, with an emphasis on the period between 1900 and the present.  The primary purpose of the course is to address time and place specific variations in the incorporation of the Mexican community as a national minority and bottom segment of the U.S. working class.  One of my central concerns is to explain two inter-related historical trends in this incorporation, steady upward mobility and unrelenting social marginalization.

The course will be divided into two parts.  The first will survey the history with lectures and readings from our two texts.  The second part will focus on the representations of Mexicans through selected films.  In both cases, I will assign writing exercises, require attendance and encourage discussion.

Grading

The course grade will be based on three short examinations (45%), three chapter reports (15%), and four film reports (40%).  Your final grade will be computed cumulatively.

Texts

Manuel G. Gonzales, Mexicanos, A History of Mexicans in the US (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1999).  A copy of the book is available on a two-hour reserve basis at the PCL.

Vicki L. Ruiz, From Out of the Shadows; Mexican Women in Twentieth-Century America (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2008).  An electronic copy of the book is available at the library

HIS 314K • History Of Mexican Amers In Us

39270 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 1000-1100 BUR 108
show description

HISTORY OF MEXICAN AMERICANS IN THE UNITED STATES
Spring 2010

 
Emilio Zamora
Garrison 2.104B, 475-8706 (office), 739-0168 (cell)
E.zamora@mail.utexas.edu

Office Hours: Tues: 9-10, 1-2, and by appointment

 

Course Description

The reading and lecture course examines the historical development of the Mexican community in the United States since 1848, with an emphasis on the period between 1900 and the present.  The primary purpose of the course is to address time and place specific variations in the incorporation of the Mexican community as a national minority and bottom segment of the U.S. working class.  One of my central concerns is to explain two inter-related historical trends in this incorporation, steady upward mobility and unrelenting social marginalization.  I emphasize work experiences, race thinking, social relations, trans-border relations, social causes and larger themes in U.S. history such as wars, sectional differences, industrialization, reform, labor and civil rights struggles, and the development of a modern urbanized society. Also, I incorporate relevant aspects of the history of Latinos, African Americans, and Mexico. 

Course materials, including a copy of my resume, this syllabus, lecture notes, and notes on interviewing techniques, will be available on Blackboard, UT’s course management site.  Call the ITS help desk (475-9400) if you have questions about Blackboard.

 

Course Requirements

         Your course grade will be based on a mid-term examination (25%), a final examination (25%), a research paper (30%), two chapter reports (10%) and a film report (10%).  Your final grade will be computed cumulatively.  The final examination will cover the material from the middle to the end of the semester.  I will discuss the requirements more fully in class.

        Mid-Term Examination.  The examination will be administered on March 10, and will include identification and essay questions.  I will post a review sheet for the examination and devote most of the class meeting prior to the examination—March 8—to a discussion of the review sheet.

        Final Examination.  The final examination will also include identification and essay questions on the material covered in the course since the mid-term examination.  I will post a review sheet for the final examination and devote part of our last class on May 7 to a discussion of the review sheet.

       Research Project.  You will be expected to write a 12-page history of your family based on at least two interviews and two overarching themes (e.g., immigration, work experiences, identity) spanning three generations or more.  The paper is due on April 28.  I will provide instructions on interviewing and the writing of the paper.  I am willing to provide an optional research assignment if students are unable to prepare a family history paper.

       Chapter Reports.  Select two assigned chapters (from the following: Gonzales—Chapters 4, 5, 6, 7; Zamora—Chapters 2, 3, 4, 5) and prepare ¾-page reports for each that address the following questions: What is the issue or point that the author is explaining or arguing?  How does he go about doing this?  How effective is his explanation or argument?  Each report will be worth 5 points and will be due on the meeting after the chapter is assigned.  A report on Gonzalez’ Chapter 4, for instance, should be submitted on February 3, at the end of the class period.

       Film Report.  Students can earn a maximum of 10 points by preparing a 2-3-page report on one of the two films that will be shown in class.  The report should minimally address the following: the overall purpose of the film, the supportive arguments and techniques that the film maker uses, and the relevance of the film to the course content.  The report will be due on the class meeting after the showing of the film that you will have selected.  For instance, if you select “A Medal for Benny,” submit the report on March 22.

      Extra Credit. On February 26, the Center for Mexican American Studies will be hosting a conference that will include history presentations.  You could earn as many as 3 extra points for your final grade, if you submit a ¾-page report on one of the history presentations.

      Attendance.  More than three unexcused absences will result in a five-point deduction on the final grade, and one more point deduction for every class missed after the three unexcused absences.  Also, you are expected to be on time for class and to remain in the classroom for the duration of the class.  Teaching assistants will be checking attendance and I will reward students who attend regularly (with an allowance of two unexcused absence) with one or two points if this can help them reach the next higher letter grade for the course.

 

Grading

I will use the following grading scale:

            A            93-100
            A-            90-92
            B+            87-89
            B            83-86
            B-            80-82
            C+            77-79
            C            73-76
            C-            70-72
            D+            67-69
            D            63-66
            D-            60-62
            F            59 and Below

 

Textbooks

Manuel G. Gonzales, Mexicanos, A History of Mexicans in the US (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1999).  A copy of the book is available on a two-hour reserve basis at the PCL.

Hector Tobar, Translation Nation (New York: Riverhead Books, 2005). A copy of the book is available on a two-hour reserve basis at the PCL.

Emilio Zamora, Claiming Rights and Righting Wrongs in Texas, Mexican Workers and Job Politics during WWII (College Station: Texas A&M University Press, 2009).  A copy of the book is available on a two-hour reserve basis at the PCL.

 

Films

“A Medal for Benny,” 1945.  Paramount Pictures.
“Taking Back the Schools,” Part 3 of Chicano! History of the Mexican American Civil Rights Movement, 1996.           

 

Schedule

I will initiate the classes with general remarks or lectures that address the statements and questions that I have noted for each class meeting.  Outlined notes corresponding to each class meeting will be posted on Blackboard.  The reading assignments require that you come to the next class meeting prepared to discuss them.  The assignment that I note for February 1 (Chapter 4 from Gonzales’ book), for instance, means that you should have done the reading by the subsequent class meeting, on February 3.

 

Part I. Introduction

 

1-20            Introduction
I will discuss the texts, course schedule, requirements, expectations, terms, and concepts in our study of Mexican American history.  Special attention will be given to the assigned family history paper.           

1-22            Mexican American History I
My general introductory comments on the history of Mexicans in the United States will focus on the subject as both a recent (since the late 1960s) area of study as well as a long-standing experience of a people (since pre-Colombian times) that reflects succeeding phases of social development.

1-25            Mexican American History II
I will discuss the primary purpose of the course, that is, to examine the way Mexicans have been incorporated into American society and the consequences of this social incorporation.  My primary concern will be to explain how Mexicans have undergone upward occupational and social mobility at the same time that they have remained marginalized since the middle 1800s. 

 

Part II. The Conquest Generation, 1848-1900

1-27        Pre-20th Century Review: Independent Mexico, U.S. Expansionism, and Wars, I
An expansionist United States reached the current Southwest as Spanish colonial rule was waning (1821-48) and Mexico was achieving its independence (1921).  The result included wars (Texas insurrection, 1835-36; Mexico-U.S. war 1846-48), Mexico’s loss of more than one-half of its territory, the absorption of the “Mexican cession” into a politically charged environment in the United States, and the incorporation of Mexicans as a territorial minority.  I will also address different interpretations in Mexican American history with reference to works by Carey McWilliams (North From Mexico), Juan Gómez-Quiñones (Roots of Chicano Politics), and Mario García (Mexican Americans).

1-29         Pre-20th Century Review: Independent Mexico, U.S. Expansionism, and Wars, II

2-1          The Territorial, Political, and Economic Incorporation of the Annexed Territories
Assignment: Gonzales, Chapter 4
We will continue the discussion initiated during the previous class meetings, paying closer attention to the consequences of the wars to selected regions and communities.  I will use Albert Camarillo’s study of Santa Barbara (Chicanos in a Changing Society) to illustrate how military occupation, racial conflict, and the arrival of Anglo newcomers introduced important social and political changes.  I will use his concepts of proletarianization and barrioization to explain social marginalization and community building.

2-3       The Mexican Social Structure Collapses
We will discuss Gonzales’ treatment of the last half of the nineteenth century and expand Camarillo’s local and regional analysis into New Mexico and Texas with studies by Sara Deutsch (No Separate Refuge) and David Montejano (Anglos and Mexicans in the Making of Texas).

Part III. The Mexicanist Generation, 1900-1930s

2-5      New Social Relations Emerge at the Turn of the Century
Assignment: Gonzales, Chapter 5
Unequal and racialized social relations emerged with the more advanced economic incorporation of the Southwest.  The industrialization of the southwestern economy included the development of railroads, mining, agriculture (ranching and farming), urban based industries like construction, and a demand for low-wage Mexican labor.  The racial ideas that emerged “naturally” from this unique form of economic development joined with imported antipathies directed against the “other” as well as negative ideas associated with the wars (1835-36, 1846-48) and the undeclared “low intensity” fighting of the late nineteenth century.  Studies by Montejano (Anglos and Mexicans in the Making of Texas) and Anoldo De León (They Called Them Greasers) will help us understand the role that racial ideas played in justifying and reinforcing inequality.

2-8       Work, Migration, and Community Building
    Immigration is a central theme during the early 1900s because it explains concepts like the reserve army of Mexican labor, labor controls, and workers’ struggles as transnational social movements.  The subject of immigration also allows us to understand the unequal relations between Mexico and the United States and the emerging differences and divisions in the Mexican community.  I will use works by Carey McWilliams (North From Mexico) and Emilio Zamora (The World of the Mexican Worker in Texas).

2-10     Mexico, Self-organizing, and a Moralist Mexican Political Culture, I
    Organizations, especially mutual aid societies, reflected and reinforced the popular collectivist value of mutualism.  Sara Estela Ramirez, a teacher, poet, and early supporter of an anarchist-syndicalist exiled group, was a major exponent of the cultural value and her writings explain how intellectuals like her promoted mutualism, reciprocity, and even altruism to sustain different social causes.  Works by Gómez-Quiñones (Sembradores) and Zamora (The World of the Mexican Worker in Texas) will serve as points of reference.

2-12    Mexico, Self-organizing, and a Moralist Mexican Political Culture, II

2-15   Americanization, Political Divisions and a New Ethnic Ethos
            Assignment: Gonzalez, Chapter 6
I will refer to three important political leaders—Clemente Idar, Emilio Flores, and José de la Luz Saenz—to illustrate how class and political differences led to divisions over identity, immigration, and radical political ideas during the first three decades of the twentieth century.  The armed revolt of 1915 in South Texas and the emergence of the moderate League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) in 1929 reflect the political distance between Mexican activists.  I will use Zamora’s study of Mexican workers in Texas to address the subject of political divisions.

2-17       The Depression Years: Hard Times, Survival, and Activism
   Mexicans were especially hard hit during the Depression.  Hard times, however, also reinforced mutualism and unity, and energized the Mexican social movement, especially the cause for workers’ rights.  The recent study by Zaragosa Vargas (Labor Rights and Civil Rights) will help us address the hard times of the Depression.

2-19     Our class will not meet today.  I will be attending a history faculty retreat.

2-22       Summary Discussion
Assignment: Gonzales, Chapter 7; Zamora, Chapter 2

 

Part IV. The Mexican Americanist Generation, 1940s-1960s

2-24     War, Recovery, and Unequal Opportunities, I
     Assignment (on Blackboard): Occupational Table, 1930-70;
Mexicans, like the rest of the nation, recovered from the hard times of the Depression when the wartime demand on the economy provided them more better-paying jobs, especially in urban areas.  Mexicans, however, they did not benefit from wartime opportunities to the same extent as Anglos and Blacks.  I will also make reference to works by Walter Fogel (Mexican Americans in Southwest Labor Markets) and Mario Barrera (Race and Class in the Southwest), Alonso Perales (Are We Good Neighbors?) and Pauline Kibbe (Latin Americans in Texas) .

2-26     You are encouraged to attend the 2010 NACCS Tejas Foco Conference, UT (details of the conference will be made available later) and prepare ¾-page report on a Mexican American history presentation that answers the following questions: What was a major point or argument in the presentation; How did the presenter support his/her argument; and How would you assess his/her effectiveness?

3-1       War, Recovery, and Unequal Opportunities, II
     Assignment: Zamora, Chapter 3

3-3    The Cause for Equal Rights and Mexico
            Submit conference report
Drawing primarily from the Chapter 3 assignment, I argue that Mexico’s decision to intervene on behalf of Mexican rights in the United States encouraged the State Department “to bring the Good Neighbor Policy home” and elevated racial discrimination to a point of major importance in relations between Mexico and the United States.

3-5     Our class will not meet today.  I will be attending a history conference

3-8      Review for Mid-Term Examination
      
A review sheet will be posted.

3-10    Mid-Term Examination

3-12     Film: “A Medal for Benny”
Search the internet for information on the film.  Aside from the suggested questions in the requirements section, you may want to ask the following: Why would Paramount Pictures acknowledge that Mexicans were making important contributions to the war effort and that Anglos were insensitive to this and other important aspects of Mexican life?  Why would the film caricature Mexicans as slow-witted exotics?  What memorable moment in the film illustrates an underlying argument or contention?

3-12    Film: “A Medal for Benny.”  A second class meeting is required to finish viewing the 77-minute film.

      Spring Break, 3-15/3-19

3-22    Discussion of the film and its relation to the course
     Assignment: Zamora, Chapter 4
           Submit Film Report

3-24    Energizing the Cause for Equal Rights
Assignment: Zamora, Chapter 5
Texas became a key site in testing the importance of discrimination in racialized politics and in explaining the emergence of LULAC as the principal Mexican civil rights organization in the country.

3-26    The Mexican Cause for Civil and Labor Rights in Texas
            Assignment, Gonzales, Chapter 7
The work of the Fair Employment Practice Committee offers a way to measure the influence of the Good Neighbor Policy in the cause for equal rights.

3-29        The State at Cross Purposes
     The case of the FEPC and the United States Employment Service demonstrates that the activist state of the 1940s promoted upward mobility and reinforce inequality.  This observation becomes more important during the post-war period as Mexican American civil rights leaders increasingly turn to government as the final arbiter in promoting equal rights.

3-31            The 1950s, New Strategies during the Post-War Period
       Demographic changes, urbanization, and an optimism that drew inspiration from the nation’s foundational documents encouraged unionization, electoral politics, and legal challenges against discrimination and segregation.

4-2      The 1950s:Acculturation and Assimilation
          Assignment: Gonzales, Chapter 8
The Mexican community underwent significant social differentiation and pursued multiple acculturation paths.  LULAC and the American G.I. Forum practiced a form of liberal pluralism while disillusionment with persistent discrimination and inequality forecast political divisions.

 

Part V. The Recent Generation, 1960s-Present

4-5      The Chicano Movement, I
            Assignment: Gonzales, Chapter 9
An examination of the major leaders—César Chavez, Reies Lopez Tijerina, Rodolfo Gonzalez, and José Angel Gutierrez—allows us to examine the major trends in the Mexican social movement.

4-7      The Chicano Movement, II

4-09     Social Thought and Intellectual Production
    The new form of political activism was not limited to organized action against injustices and inequality.  It was also evident in the intellectual activity that accompanied it and that generated new and reformulated ideas about group identity, civic culture, social entitlement, and strategies for change found expression in literature, public performances, and popular culture.

4-14    Film: “Taking Back the Schools,” Part 3 of Chicano, History of the Mexican American Civil Rights Movement
 Search the internet for information on the film.  Aside from the suggested questions in the requirements section, you may want to ask the following: Why are the school walkouts deserving of our attention? How does the technique of juxtaposing Does the film address relevant issues? 

4-16    Film: “Taking Back the Schools.”  A second class meeting is required to finish viewing the 57-minute film.

4-21    Discussion of film
How does this film help us better understand the Mexican social movement of the 1960s?  I will use the book by Rosales (Chicano!) as a reference.

4-23     New Opportunities and Persistent Inequality, I
A framework that accounts for upward social mobility alongside inequality helps us explain seemingly contradictory trends in education, health, and employment.  For instance, Mexican youth are graduating from high school in record numbers while their high dropout rates remain significantly high.

4-26    New Opportunities and Persistent Inequality,II

Part VI. Latinos

4-28   The Latino Population
            Submit Papers
 
            Assignment: Tobar, Part 1
My principal aim is to provide a demographic profile of the Latino population and address the challenge of studying them as a community with shared experiences.  I will draw on the anthology by Marcelo Suárez-Orozco, Latinos: Remaking America.  The lecture will serve as preparation for the commentary and discussions that will begin on April 30.  Students should come to class prepared to explain how each of Tobar’s assigned chapters support his overall argument in the book—that Latinos are changing the country as they themselves undergo major transformations. 

4-30   Commentary and Discussion
          Assignment: Tobar, Part II         

5-3     Commentary and Discussion
            Assignment: Tobar, Part III

5-5     Commentary and Discussion

5-7     Final Examination Review

The date for the examination will be announced early in the semester.

HIS 320R • Texas, 1914 To The Present

39490 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm UTC 3.112
show description

Texas History, 1914 to the Present
Spring 2010

 Emilio Zamora
Garrison 1.132, 475-8706 (office)
E.zamora@mail.utexas.edu

Office Hours: Tues: 9-10, 1-2, and by appointment

Course Description

            The reading and lecture course surveys change and continuity in the history of Texas within the context of U.S. history.  Special attention is given to politics and social relations between 1900 and 1970, as well as the home front experience of Texans during the Second World War.  The overriding theme is the incorporation of Texas into the national socio-economy from the state’s early “colonized” status to its modern position as a fully integrated part of the nation.  The course is organized around our readings.  The De la Teja/Marks/Tyler text provides a synthesis of Texas history while the Green and Zamora texts provided closer examinations of two central themes—the Second World War and politics during the last half of the twentieth century.

         Three semester hours of Texas history may be substituted for half of the American history requirement.  Course materials, including a copy of my resume, this syllabus, lecture notes, bibliographies, and notes on interviewing techniques, will be available on Blackboard (http://courses.utexas.edu), UT’s course management site.  Call the ITS help desk (475-9400) if you have problems accessing the site.

Course Requirements

        Your course grade will be based on a mid-term examination (25%), a final examination (25%), a research paper (30%), two chapter reports (10%) and a film report (10%).  Your final grade will be computed cumulatively.  The final examination will cover the material from the middle to the end of the semester.  I will discuss the requirements more fully in class.

       Mid-Term Examination.  The examination, administered on March 12, will include identification and essay questions.

       Final Examination.  The final examination will also include identification and essay questions on the material covered in the course since the mid-term examination.  I will announce the date of the final examination once the university administration makes it available.

 Research Paper.  The paper should be a 10 to 12-page family history that spans at least three generations and that is based on interviews with at least two persons in the family.  The paper should address at least two themes addressed in the course (e.g., politics, work, immigration, education, identity).  The paper is due on April 23.  I will devote four class periods to instructions on conducting the interviews, interpreting the findings, and writing the paper.  I am willing to make an optional research assignment if you are unable to meet this one.

Chapter Reports.  Select two assigned chapters and prepare ¾-page reports for each that address the following questions: What is the issue or point that the author is explaining or arguing?  How does he go about doing this?  How effective is his explanation or argument?  Each report will be worth 5 points and will be due on the meeting after the chapter is assigned.  A report on De la Teja Gonzalez’ Chapter 11 (assigned on January 29), for instance, should be submitted on February 1, at the end of the class period.

Report.  Prepare a two-page report on one of the two films that will be shown in class.  The report should minimally address the following: the overall purpose of the film, the supportive arguments and techniques that the film maker uses, and the relevance of the film to the course content.  The report will be due on the class meeting after the showing of the film that you will have selected.  For instance, if you select “The Life and Times of Rosie the Riveter” (to be shown on March 29 and April 2), submit the report on April 7.

Attendance.  More than three unexcused absences will result in a five-point deduction on the final grade, and one more point deduction for every class missed after the three unexcused absences.  Also, you are expected to be on time for class and to remain in the classroom for the duration of the class.  Teaching assistants will be checking attendance and I will reward students who attend regularly (with an allowance of two unexcused absence) with one or two points if this can help them reach a higher letter grade for the course.

Grading

I will use the following grading scale:

            A            93-100
            A-            90-92
            B+            87-89
            B            83-86
            B-            80-82
            C+            77-79
            C            73-76
            C-            70-72
            D+            67-69
            D            63-66
            D-            60-62
            F            59 and Below

 

Readings

Randolph B. Campbell, “Modern Texas, 1971-2001,” In Gone To Texas, A History of the Lone Star State by Randolph B. Campbell (New York: Oxford University Press, 2003): 438-67.  Electronic copy available at library.

Jesús de la Teja, Paula Marks, and Ron Tyler, Texas, Crossroads of North America (New York: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2004).  A copy of the book is available on a two-hour reserve basis at the PCL.

George Green, The Establishment in Texas Politcs; The Primitive Years, 1938-1957 (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1979).  A copy of the book is available on a two-hour reserve basis at the PCL.

Emilio Zamora, Claiming Rights and Righting Wrongs in Texas, Mexican Workers and Job Politics during WWII (College Station: Texas A&M University Press, 2009).  A copy of the book is available on a two-hour reserve basis at the PCL.

 

Films

The Life and Times of Rosie the Riveter, 65 minutes
The Strange Demise of Jim Crow
, 57 minutes

 

Schedule

I will initiate the classes with general remarks or lectures based on outlined notes that I will post on Blackboard prior to each class meeting.  These remarks or lectures are noted as topics in the schedule.  The reading assignments correspond to the remarks or lectures scheduled for the next class meeting.  The topic “Summary Discussion” and the “Review for Examination” will allow us to take stock of the material that we will have read and discussed.

 

Introduction

1-18      Course Introduction
            Texts, course schedule, requirements, and expectations in the course.           

1-20       The Family History Paper, I
            The major writing assignment in the course requires special attention.  I will post in Blackboard helpful research and writing suggestions and devote this class period to a discussion of the assignment

1-22      Texas History
Our focus today will be the overall theme of the course, that is, to describe and explain the history of the incorporation of Texas into the national socio-economy

 

First Section

1-25       Background to the Twentieth Century, 1836-1900, I
            My purpose today and January 27 is to introduce the twentieth century with a survey of Texas history during the last half of the twentieth century.  I will address the early phase of incorporation with an emphasis on the wars, the cotton culture, industrialization, demography, social relations, and early reform.

1-27      Background to the Twentieth Century, 1836-1900, II

1-29      Background to the Twentieth Century, 1836-1900, II
Assignment: De la Teja, “Preface” and Chapter 11

2-1       Early Twentieth Century, 1900-1930, I
I will provide a general survey of Texas history during the early 1900s. 

2-3       Early Twentieth Century, 1900-1930, II
 Our attention will be on social reform, the advent of farming, and labor organizing as a feature of the emerging urban setting.

2-5      Early Twentieth Century, 1900-1930, III
My focus is on mutuality as a moral basis for many of the social causes of the early 1900s.

2-8      Summary Discussion
This will be the first in a series of discussions to take stock of the previous reading assignments and lectures.

2-10     The Family History Paper, II
Assignment: De la Teja, Chapter 12, Green, Chapter 4

2-12     The Great Depression, I
I will offer general observations on the economic crisis, the federal government’s efforts at relief, recovery and reform, and the political issues that an activist state generated in Texas.

2-17    The Great Depression, II
Assignment: Green, Chapter 7

2-19    Our class will not meet today.  I will be attending a history faculty retreat.

2-22     World War II
I will be primarily concerned with describing in general terms the war and home front experiences of Texans.
Assignment: Zamora, Chapter 2

2-24     Wartime Recovery, I
I will discuss the expansion of the economy, recovery experiences, and the government’s role in ameliorating and reinforcing social inequalities.
Assignment: Zamora, Chapter 3

2-26     Wartime Recovery, II           

3-1       The Good Neighbor Policy, Mexico, and Texas, I
Drawing on Chapter 3, I will discuss how Mexico influenced the State Department to promote improved ethnic relations in places like Texas.

3-3     The Good Neighbor Policy, Mexico, and Texas, II

3-5      Our class will not meet today.  I will be attending a history conference.

3-8      The Oral History Paper, III

3-10    Summary Review

3-12      Review for the Mid-Term Examination

Spring Break, 3-15/3-19

3-22     Mid-Term Examination
Assignment: Green, Chapter 5

3-24    Politics in the 1940s, I
Assignment: Green, Chapter 7

3-26     Politics in the 1940s, II
I will discuss conservative rule in Texas with a focus on Governor Coke Stevenson, a state’s rights advocate and proponent of “small government”.

3-29     Film: The Life and Times of Rosie the Riveter

4-2      Film: The Life and Times of Rosie the Riveter.  A second class meeting is required to finish viewing the 65-minute film.  The remaining time in the class will be devoted to a discussion of the film.
Assignment: Zamora, Chapter 5

4-5      Open

4-7      The Family History Paper, IV
Also, discussion of film.

4-9    The FEPC and Workers in Texas
Assignment: Zamora, Chapter 6
The FEPC encouraged interracial unity and triggered the opposition of states’ rights advocates like Coke Stevenson.

4-12   The FEPC and Oil in Texas
Inequality and the fight for equal rights were evident in wartime industries like the oil refineries.           

4-14    Summary Discussion
Assignment: de la Teja, Chapter 13

4-16    Texas Politics, 1940s and 1950s
Assignment: Green, Chapter 8

4-19    The Establishment Still Rules, I
Assignment: Green, Chapter 10

4-21     The Establishment Still Rules, II

4-23     Film: The Strange Demise of Jim Crow, 1997.

            Submit Paper

4-26     Film: The Strange Demise of Jim Crow, 1997.

4-28    Economic Growth and Expansion, The Driving Force
Assignment: Green, Chapter 12
Also, discussion of film.

4-30    The Liberal Challenge
Assignment: “Modern Texas, 1971-2001”

5-3      Summary Review

5-5      Discussion of Relevance of Paper to Texas History

5-7      Review for Final Examination           

HIS 392 • Oral Hist: Theory And Practice

40025 • Spring 2010
Meets W 200pm-500pm GAR 1.122
(also listed as MAS 392 )
show description

Graduate standing and consent of the graduate adviser.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

 

HIS 314K • History Of Mexican Amers In Us

39635 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm UTC 4.132
show description

Instructor: Emilio Zamora

Garrison 1.132, 475-8706 (office), 739-0168 (cell)
E.zamora@mail.utexas.edu

Office Hours: W: 9-12, and by appointment

Course Description

The lecture course examines the historical development of the Mexican community in the United States since 1848.  The primary purpose of the course is to describe and explain time and place specific variations in the socio-cultural incorporation of the Mexican community as a national minority and bottom segment of the U.S. working class.  I will emphasize inequality, trans-border relations, migrations, social struggles, and the home-front experience during the 1940s.  I will also discuss Mexican American history within the context of U.S., Latino, and Mexico history and, whenever possible, relate it to African American history. 

Course materials, including a copy of my resume, this syllabus, lecture notes, and notes on interviewing techniques, will be available on Blackboard, UT's course management site.  If you have questions regarding Blackboard, call the ITS help desk, 475-9400.

Course Requirements

         Your course grade will be based on a mid-term examination (30%), a final examination (30%), a research paper (25%), a preliminary planning statement for the research paper (5%), and a film report (10%).  Your final grade will be computed cumulatively.  The final examination will cover the material from the middle to the end of the semester.  I will discuss the requirements more fully in class.

Mid-Term Examination.  The examination will be administered on October 15, and will include identification and essay questions.  I will post a review sheet for the examination and devote most of the class meeting prior to the examination-October 13-to a discussion of the review sheet.

Final Examination.  The final examination-to be administered on Thursday, December 10, 2-5pm-will also include identification and essay questions on the material covered in the course since the mid-term examination.  I will post a review sheet for the final examination and devote part of our last class on December 3 to a discussion of the review sheet.

Research Project.  You will be expected to write a 12-15 page history of your family based on at least two interviews and two overarching themes (e.g., immigration, work experiences, identity) spanning three generations or more.  The paper is due on November 24.  I will provide instructions on interviewing and the writing of the paper.  I am willing to provide an optional research assignment if students are unable to prepare a family history paper.  An optional research assignment will also required a Planning Statement that I can discuss with the students.

Planning Statement.  Students will be expected to prepare a 1-2 page document that tentatively describes the planned family history paper (or an optional research project).  It should be based on a preliminary conversation with someone in your family, preferably one of the persons you will interview.  You will need to use this conversation to make some basic decisions, for example: names of persons who you will interview, why you selected them, when and where you will interview them, their biographies, the themes that you will address, the basic arguments that you will make, and examples of documents and photos that you might use.  Prepare the planning statement with this information and submit it on September 15.

Film Report.  Students can earn a maximum of 10 points by preparing a 2-3-page report on one of the two films that will be shown in class.  The report should minimally address the following: the overall purpose of the film, the supportive arguments and techniques that the film maker uses, and the relevance of the film to the course content.  The report will be due on the class meeting after the showing of the film that you will have selected.  For instance, if you select "A Medal for Benny,"' submit the report on September 27.

Attendance.  Attendance is critical.  More than three unexcused absences will result in a five-point deduction on the final grade, and one more point deduction for every class missed after the three unexcused absences.  Also, you are expected to be on time for class and to remain in the classroom for the duration of the class.  Teaching assistants will be checking attendance and I will reward students who attend regularly (with an allowance of one unexcused absence) with one or two points if this can help them reach the next higher letter grade for the course.  Class participation is also highly recommended. 

Grading

            Beginning this fall 2009, the university has recommended a minus/plus grading system for all undergraduate courses.  I will use the following scale:

    A    93-100
    A-    90-92
    B+    87-89
    B    83-86
    B-    80-82
    C+    77-79
    C    73-76
    C-    70-72
    D+    67-69
    D    63-66
    D-    60-62
    F    59 and Below

Textbooks

Manuel G. Gonzales, Mexicanos, A History of Mexicans in the US (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1999).

Hector Tobar, Translation Nation (New York: Riverhead Books, 2005).

Emilio Zamora, Claiming Rights and Righting Wrongs in Texas, Mexican Workers and Job Politics during WWII (College Station: Texas A&M University Press, 2009).

Films

"A Medal for Benny," 1945.  Paramount Pictures. 

"Taking Back the Schools," Part 3 of Chicano!, History of the Mexican American Civil Rights Movement, 1996.   

Schedule

I will initiate the classes with general remarks or lectures that address the statements and questions that I have noted for each class meeting.  Outlined notes that correspond to each class meeting will be posted on Blackboard.  The reading assignments require that you come to the next class meeting prepared to discuss them.  The assignment that is made on September 8 (Chapter 4 from Gonzales' book), for instance, means that you should have done the reading by the subsequent, September 10, class meeting.

Part I. Introduction

8-27     Introduction

            Aside from discussing course requirements and expectations, I will discuss the primary purpose of the course, that is, to examine the way Mexicans have been incorporated into American society and the consequences of this social incorporation.  This will require some attention to definitional terms, periodization considerations, premises, basic historical themes, and interpretations.  I will devote some of the class period to a discussion of the assigned family history paper.

9-1       Mexican American History

The history of Mexicans in the United States is both a recent (since the late 1960s) scholarly area of study as well as a long-standing experience of a people (since pre-Colombian times) that reflects succeeding phases of development with corresponding sets of documentary, archival, and oral records.  I will discuss the process of historical production (with reference to Michel-Rolph Trouillot's Silencing the Past) and history as both an area of study and experience.

9-3       Pre-20th Century Review: Independent Mexico, U.S. Expansionism, and Wars

            An expansionist United States reached the current Southwest as colonial rule by New Spain was waning (1821-48) and Mexico was achieving its independence (1921).  The result included wars (Texas insurrection, 1835-36; Mexico-U.S. war 1846-48), Mexico's loss of more than one half of its territory, the absorption of the "Mexican cession" into a politically charged environment, and the incorporation of Mexicans as a territorial minority.  I will also address a difference of interpretation on 1848 as a point of departure in Mexican American history (with reference to works by Carey McWilliams (North From Mexico), Juan Gómez-Quiñones (Roots of Chicano Politics), and Mario García (Mexican Americans).

Part II. Conquest Generation, 1848-1900

9-8       The Political and Economic Incorporation of the Annexed Territories, Overview

            Assignment: Gonzales, Chapter 4, The American Southwest, 1848-1900

            We will continue the discussion initiated during the previous class meeting, paying closer attention to the series of events that led to Mexico's loss of its northern territory between 1836 and 1848.

9-10 The Mexican Social Structure Collapses

I will use Albert Camarillo's study of Santa Barbara (Chicanos in a Changing Society) to illustrate how military occupation, racial conflict, and the arrival of Anglo newcomers led to the social marginalization of the Mexican community.  I will use his concept of proletarianization and his occupational data for Santa Barbara and the area of Southern California to demonstrate marginalization as well Mexican community building.  Studies by Sara Deutsch (No Separate Refuge) and David Montejano (Anglos and Mexicans in the Making of Texas) will allow us to extend Camarillo's findings into New Mexico and Texas.

Submit Planning Statement

9-15     New Relations Emerge

            Assignment: Gonzales, Chapter 5, The Great Migration, 1900-1930

            Unequal and racialized social relations emerged in the 19th century.  The industrialization of the southwestern economy (including railroads, mining, agriculture, and urban based industries like construction) included a demand for low-wage Mexican labor.  This as well as racial ideas that emerged "naturally" from this unique form of economic development joined with imported antipathies directed against the "other" as well as negative ideas that emerged during the wars (1835-36, 1846-48) and the undeclared "low intensity" fighting of the late 19th century.  Studies by Montejano (Anglos and Mexicans in the Making of Texas) and Anoldo De León (They Called Them Greasers) will help us understand the role that these racial ideas played in justifying and reinforcing inequality.

Part III. Mexicanist Generation, 1900-1930s

9-17     Work, Migration, and Community Building

            Immigration is a central theme during the early 1900s because it explains concepts like the reserve army of Mexican labor, labor controls, and workers' struggles as transnational social movements.  The subject of immigration also allows us to understand the unequal relations between Mexico and the United States and the emerging differences and divisions in the Mexican community.  I will use works by Carey McWilliams (North From Mexico) and Emilio Zamora (The World of the Mexican Worker in Texas).

9-22     Mexico, Self-organizing, and a Moralist Mexican Political Culture

            Organizations, especially mutual aid societies, reflected and reinforced the popular collectivist value of mutualism.  Sara Estela Ramirez, a teacher, poet, and early supporter of an anarchist-syndicalist exiled group, was a major exponent of the cultural value and her writings explain how intellectuals like her promoted mutualism, reciprocity, and even altruism to sustain different social causes.  Works by Gómez-Quiñones (Sembradores) and Zamora (The World of the Mexican Worker in Texas) will serve as points of reference.

9-24     Americanization, Political Divisions and a New Ethnic Ethos

            Assignment: Gonzalez, Chapter 6

            I will refer to three important political leaders-Clemente Idar, Emilio Flores, and José de la Luz Saenz-to illustrate how class and political differences led to divisions over identity, immigration, and radical political ideas during the first three decades of the twentieth century.  The armed revolt of 1915 in South Texas and the emergence of the moderate League of United Latin American Citizens in 1929 reflect the political distance between Mexican activists.  I will use Zamora's study of Mexican workers in Texas to address the subject of political divisions.

9-29     The Depression Years: Hard Times, Survival, and Activism

            Assignment: Gonzales, Chapter 7, pp. 161-175

            Mexicans were especially hard hit during the Depression.  Hard times, however, also reinforced mutualism and unity, and energized the Mexican social movement, especially the cause for workers' rights.  The recent study by Zaragosa Vargas (Labor Rights and Civil Rights) will help us address the hard times of the Depression.

Part IV. Mexican American Generation, 1940s-1960s

10-1     War, Recovery, and Postwar Disillusionment, Overview

Assignment (on Blackboard): Occupational Table, 1930-70; Zamora, Chapter 2

Mexicans, like the rest of the nation, recovered from the hard times of the depression when the wartime demand on the economy resulted in more better-paying jobs, especially in urban areas.  Mexicans joined the rural to urban migration and registered social advances, however, they did not benefit from wartime opportunities to the same extent as Anglos and even Blacks. 

10-6     Wartime Recovery and Unequal Opportunities in Texas

            Assignment: Zamora, Chapter 3

I will use an occupational table for the 1930-70 period to demonstrate that discrimination and other problems denied Mexican equal opportunities and essentially froze them in place as low-wage workers.  The resulting disillusionment was evident in the 1950s and 1960.  I will also make reference to works by Walter Fogel (Mexican Americans in Southwest Labor Markets) and Mario Barrera (Race and Class in the Southwest), Alonso Perales (Are We Good Neighbors?) and Pauline Kibbe (Latin Americans in Texas) .

10-8     Open.  I decided to leave this date "open" to revisit topics (including the paper assignment) that may require additional attention.

10-13   Review for Mid-Term Examination

            A review sheet will be posted.

10-15   Mid-Term Examination

            The teaching assistants will administer the examination.  I will be attending an oral history conference.

10-22   Film: "A Medal for Benny"

         Search the internet for information on the film.  The following is an example: http://movies.nytimes.com/movie/review?res=9806E3DC153BEE3BBC4C51DFB366838E659EDE

10-27   Discussion of the film and its relation to the course

Assignment: Zamora, Chapter 4

You may want to ask questions like the following in preparing your report or preparing for class discussion: Why would Paramount Pictures broadcast the acknowledgment that Mexicans were making important contributions to the war effort and that Anglos were insensitive to this and other important aspects of Mexican life?  Why would the film caricature Mexicans as slow-witted exotics?  What memorable moment in the film illustrates an underlying argument or contention.

10-27   Mexico and Race as a Hemispheric Issue

Assignment: Zamora, Chapter 5

What do I mean when I say that the State Department brought its Good Neighbor Policy home to bear on Mexican-Anglo relations and how did this occur?

10-29   The Mexican Cause for Civil and Labor Rights in Texas

            An alliance with the Mexican government through its consular offices gave LULAC a special place in the social movement of the 1950s and 1960 at the same time that other organizations were waging an important cause for workers.

11-3     The State at Cross Purposes, the USES and the FEPC

            Assignment, Gonzales, Chapter 7, pp. 175-190

            The case of the USES and the FEPC demonstrates that an activist state can speak with different purposes in mind.

11-5     No Class.  I will be attending a history conference at the Rio Grande Valley.

11-10   The 1950s: Incorporation, Social Differentiation, Biculturation

            Assignment: Gonzales, Chapter 8

            The Mexican community underwent significant social differentiation and pursued multiple acculturation paths.  LULAC and the American G.I. Forum practiced a form of liberal pluralism while disillusionment with persistent discrimination and inequality forecast political divisions.

11-12   New Socio-Economic Possibilities and the Chicano Movement

            Assignment: Gonzales, Chapter 9

            An examination of the major leaders-César Chavez, Reies Lopez Tijerina, Rodolfo Gonzalez, and José Angel Gutierrez-allows us to examine the major trends in the Mexican social movement.

11-17   Film: "Taking Back the Schools," Part 3 of Chicano, History of the Mexican American Civil Rights Movement

            Search the internet for information on the film.  The following is an example:

         http://www.albany.edu/jmmh/vol3/chicano/chicano.html

 11-19   Discussion of film

            Assignment: Tobar, Part 1

            How does this film help us better understand the Mexican social movement of the 1960s?  I will use the book by Rosales (Chicano!) as a reference.

11-24   Short Lecture on Immigration and the Latino Population, and Discussion of Tobar

            Assignment: Tobar, Part II

            Submit Papers

            Why would Tobar say that Latinos are changing the United States as they themselves are undergoing significant change?  Also, how can we study Latinos if they reflect such different experiences and outlooks?  I will draw on various essays from the anthology by Marcelo Suárez-Orozco (Latinos: Remaking America).

November 26-28 Thanksgiving holidays

 12-1     Discussion of Tobar

            Assignment: Tobar, Part III

            How does Tobar's book help us better understand the Mexican-origin population?

12-3     Discussion of Tobar and Final Examination Review

            How is the process of socially incorporating Mexicans into society changed and what should we expect in the future, keeping in mind the following issues: immigration, class differentiation, persistent inequality, education, employment, health, and identity?

12-10   Final Examination, 2-5 pm

 

HIS 320R • Texas, 1914 To The Present

39855 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm UTC 3.122
show description

Instructor: Emilio Zamora

Garrison 1.132, 475-8706 (office)
E.zamora@mail.utexas.edu

Office Hours: W: 9-12, 1-2, and by appointment

Course Description

            The lecture course will survey change and continuity in the history of Texas within the context of U.S. history.  Special attention will be given to politics and social relations between 1900 and 1960, as well as the incorporation of Texas into the national socio-economy.  We will also examine themes such as socioeconomic change, labor, U.S.-Mexico relations, social movements and electoral politics.

            One of the overriding themes in the course will be the process of historical production that begins with the creation of the record and continues through the various phases of academic and non-academic interpretation.  This emphasis will give us an opportunity to view the production of history critically, as the selective narration of the past by historians, museum curators, genealogists, journalists and film makers.  We will base our assessments primarily on our readings, the research project assignment, and films.

            The course is organized around our readings.  The first section will be based on the De la Teja/Marks/Tyler text.  The intent here will be to address Texas history in the twentieth century, from the turn of the century until the 1980s.  Once the class has developed a general "working" sense of the subject, we will address two themes in Texas history-the Second World War and politics during the last half of the twentieth century.

            Three semester hours of Texas history may be substituted for half of the American history requirement.  Course materials, including a copy of my resume, this syllabus, lecture notes, bibliographies, and notes on interviewing techniques, will be available on Blackboard (http://courses.utexas.edu), UT's course management site.  Call the ITS help desk (475-9400) if you have problems accessing the site.

Course Requirements

            Your course grade will be based on a mid-term examination (30%), a final examination (30%), a research paper (30%), and a film report (10%).  Your final grade will be computed cumulatively.  The final examination will cover the material from the middle to the end of the semester.  Attendance is required and will be monitored periodically.  The requirements will be addressed fully in class.

Mid-Term Examination.  The examination, administered on October 15, will include identification and essay questions.

Final Examination.  The final examination will also include identification and essay questions on the material covered in the course since the mid-term examination.  The final examination will be administered on December 12.

Research Paper.  The paper should be a 10 to 12-page family history that spans at least three generations and that is based on interviews with at least two persons in the family.  The paper should address at least two themes addressed in the course (e.g., politics, work, immigration, education, identity).  The paper is due on December 1.  I will provide instructions in class on conducting the interviews, interpreting the findings, and writing the paper.  I am willing to make an optional research assignment if you are unable to meet this one.

Report.  You will be expected to prepare a two-page report on one of the three films that will be shown in class.  The report should minimally address the following: the overall purpose of the film, the supportive arguments and techniques that the film maker uses, and the relevance of the film to the course content.  The report will be due on the class meeting after the showing of the film that you will have selected.  For instance, if you select "The Strange Demise of Jim Crow," submit the report on September 29.

Attendance.  Attendance is critical.  More than three unexcused absences will result in a five-point deduction on the final grade, and one more point deduction for every class missed after the three unexcused absences.  Also, you are expected to be on time for class and to remain in the classroom for the duration of the class.  Our teaching assistant will be checking attendance and I will reward students who attend regularly (with an allowance of one unexcused absence) with one or two points if this can help them reach the next higher letter grade for the course.  Class participation is also highly recommended. 

Grading

            Beginning this fall 2009, the university has recommended a minus/plus grading system for all undergraduate courses.  I will use the following scale:

    A    93-100
    A-    90-92
    B+    87-89
    B    83-86
    B-    80-82
    C+    77-79
    C    73-76
    C-    70-72
    D+    67-69
    D    63-66
    D-    60-62
    F    59 and Below

Readings

Books

Jesús de la Teja, Paula Marks, and Ron Tyler, Texas, Crossroads of North America (New York: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2004).

George Green, The Establishment in Texas Politcs; The Primitive Years, 1938-1957) (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1979).

Emilio Zamora, Claiming Rights and Righting Wrongs in Texas, Mexican Workers and Job Politics during WWII (College Station: Texas A&M University Press, 2009).

Articles

Randolph B. Campbell, "Modern Texas, 1971-2001," In Gone To Texas, A History of the Lone Star State by Randolph B. Campbell (New York: Oxford University Press, 2003): 438-67.  Electronic copy available at library.

Randolph B. Campbell, "Texas in the Millenium," In Gone To Texas, A History of the Lone Star State by Randolph B. Campbell (New York: Oxford University Press, 2003): 468-71.  Electronic copy available at library.

Films

"Talkin' Union," 1976, 58 minutes

"The Life and Times of Rosie the Riveter," 65 minutes

"The Strange Demise of Jim Crow," 1997, 57 minutes

Schedule

            I will initiate the classes with general remarks or lectures based on outlined notes that I will post on Blackboard prior to each class meeting.  These remarks or lectures are noted as topics in the schedule.  The reading assignments correspond to the remarks or lectures scheduled for the next class meeting.  The topic "Discussion" that is scheduled for 2-12, 4-7, and 4-28 and the "Review for Examination" scheduled for 3-10 and 5-7 will allow us to take stock of the material that we will have read and discussed, including the family history project.

Introduction

8-27     Course Introduction

9-1       The Family History Project and the Process of Historical Production

First Section

9-3       Background to the Twentieth Century, 1836-1900

Assignment: De la Teja, "Preface" and Chapter 11

9-8       Early Twentieth Century, 1900-1930

Assignment: De la Teja, Chapter 12

9-10     No class (I will be attending a conference and will not be available during my regular office hours on Wednesday)

9-15     The Great Depression and World War II in Texas

Assignment: De la Teja, Chapter 13

9-17     The Post War and 1960s

Assignment: De la Teja, Chapter 14

9-22     Discussion

9-24     Film: The Strange Demise of Jim Crow

Second Section

9-29     Discussion of Film

10-1     Race and Class in Texas History

10-6     The Predominance of Conservatism

10-8     Film: Talkin' Union 10-13  

10-13   Discussion of film

            Review for Examination

10-15   Mid-Term Examination

            Assignment: Green, Chapter 4, "Rebellion Against the New Deal"

Third Section

10-20   The Incorporation of Texas into the Economic and Political World of the Nation

Assignment: Zamora, Chapters 2, "Wartime Recovery and Denied Opportunities"

10-22   The Wartime Economy and Recovery

Assignment: Green, Chapter 7, "The Coke Stevenson Period"

10-27Film: The Life and Times of Rosie the Riveter

10-29   Discussion of Film

            Assignment: Zamora, Chapter 3, "Elevating the Mexican Cause to a Hemispheric Level"

11-3     Internationalization of U.S. History

11-5     Class will not meet.  I will be attending a conference

            Assignment: Zamora, Chapter 4, "The Fight for Mexican Rights in Texas"

11-10   Causes for Equal Rights and Interracial Unity

Assignment: Zamora, Chapter 5, "The FEPC and Mexican Workers in Texas

11-12   The Federal Government, Friend or Foe?

Assignment: Green, Chapter 8, "The People's Path, The Jester Years"

11-17   Contesting Views in the Post War Period

            Assignment: Green, Chapter 12, "Turning Points, 1956-1957

11-19   The Liberal Cause

11-24   Discussion of Film

            November 26-28, Thanksgiving Holidays

12-1     The Conservative Legacy

            Assignment: Campbell, "Modern Texas, 1971-2001" and "Texas in the Millenium"

            Submit Papers

12-3Review for Examination

12-12   Final Examination, 7:00-10:00 pm

 

HIS 314K • History Of Mexican Amers In Us

38768 • Spring 2009
Meets TTH 930-1100 GRG 102
show description

This an introduction to the many ways Mexican Americans are a central part of American history. 

HIS 320R • Texas, 1914 To The Present

38960 • Spring 2009
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm BUR 208
show description

The course will survey change and continuity in the history of Texas within the context of U.S. history. Special attention will be given to politics and social relationships (class, race and gender relations) between 1900 and 1950. We will also examine themes such as socio-economic change, labor, transborder relations and electoral politics. Three semester hours of Texas history may be substituted for half of the legislative requirement for American history.

HIS 392 • Oral Hist: Theory And Practice

39465 • Spring 2009
Meets W 500pm-800pm GAR 1.122
show description

Graduate standing and consent of the graduate adviser.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

 

Publications

Books

The WWI Diary of José de la Luz Sáenz, Edited by Emilio Zamora; Translated by Emilio Zamora, with Ben Maya. College Station: Texas A&M University Press, 2014.

Claiming Rights and Righting Wrongs in Texas, Mexican Workers and Job Politics during World War II.  College Station: Texas A&M University Press, 2009.  Four best book awards.

The World of the Mexican Worker in Texas.  College Station: Texas A&M University Press, 1993.  Two best book awards.

El Movimiento Obrero Mexicano en el Sur de Texas, 1900-1920.  México, D.F.: Secretaría de Educación Pública, 1986.


Anthologies

Beyond the Latino World War II Hero: The Social and Political Legacy of a Generation (Co-editor with Maggie Rivas Rodríguez).  Austin: University of Texas Press, 2009. 

Mexican Americans in Texas History; Selected Essays (Lead editor, with Cynthia Orozco and Rodolfo Rocha).  Austin: Texas State Historical Association, 2000.

Chicano Discourse: Selected Conference Proceedings of the National Association for Chicano Studies (Co-Editor with Tatcho Mindiola). Houston: A NACCS Publication, Center for Mexican American Studies, 1992.


 Textbook

Texas and Its History, 2nd ed. (Author-Consultant to authors-editors Joe B. Frantz, Robert K. Holz, Mildred P. Mayhall, and Sam W. Newman).  Dallas: Pepper Jones Martinez, Inc., Publishers, 1978.


 Essays (Since 2000)

“Introduction,” In The WWI Diary of José de la Luz Sáenz, Edited by Emilio Zamora; Translated by Emilio Zamora, with Ben Maya. College Station: Texas A&M University Press, 2014, pp. 1-19.

“To Preserve Our Words is to Free Our People,” Somos, The Latino Online Literary Magazine, August 9, 2013, 12 pp.  Reprinted in Historia Chicana (Online site on Mexican American history), August 11, 2013. 

“The Failed Promise of Wartime Opportunity for Mexicans in the Texas Oil Industry,” In Texas Labor History, Edited by Bruce A. Glasrud and James C. Maroney. College Station: Texas A&M University Press, 2013.  This is a reprint of a 1992 article that appeared in the Southwestern Historical Quarterly and that received the best article award (1992) on Borderlands History from the Western Historical Association.

“Alonso Perales and the Hemispheric Strategy for Civil Rights,” In Defense of My People, Alonso S. Perales and the Development of Mexican American Public Intellectuals, Edited by Michael Olivas. Houston: Arte Público Press, 2013. 

“Moving the Liberal-Minority Coalition Up the Educational Pipeline,” In Politics and the History Curriculum: The Struggle over Standards in Texas and the Nation, Edited by Keith Erekson. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2012.

Las Escuelas del Centenario in Dolores Hidalgo, Guanajuato; Internationalizing Mexican History,” In Recovering the Hispanic History of Texas, Edited by Mónica Perales and Raul Ramos.  Houston: Arte Público Press, 2010, pp. 38-66.

“Introduction,” In Beyond the Latino World War II Hero: The Social and Political Legacy of a Generation, Edited by Maggie Rivas Rodríguez and Emilio Zamora. Austin: University of Texas Press, 2009, pp. 1-10.

“Mexican Nationals in the U.S. Military during World War II, Diplomacy and Battlefield Sacrifice,” In Beyond the Latino World War II Hero: The Social and Political Legacy of a Generation, Edited by Maggie Rivas Rodríguez and Emilio Zamora. Austin: University of Texas Press, 2009, pp. 90-109, 199-203.

“Mexico’s Wartime Intervention on Behalf of Mexicans in the United States, A Turning of Tables,” In Mexican Americans and World War II,” Edited by Maggie Rivas Rodríguez. Austin: University of Texas Press, 2005, pp. 221-43.

“History, Agency and Political Struggle; A Different View,” International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education, Special Issue, “Presence, Voice, and Politics in Chicana/o Studies,” Edited by Angela Valenzuela, Vol. 18, no. 2 (March-April 2005): 247-54.        

“La guerra en pro de la justicia y la democracia en Francia y Texas: José de la Luz Sáenz y el lenguaje del movimiento mexicano de los derechos civiles,” ISTOR, Revista  de Historia Internacional 4, Núm. 13 (Verano 2003): 9-35. Translation of 2002 article, “Fighting on Two Fronts.”

“Fighting on Two Fronts: José de la Luz Saenz and the Language of the Mexican American Civil Rights Movement,” In Recovering the U.S. Hispanic Literary Heritage, Volume IV, Edited by José F. Aranda, Jr. and Silvio Torres-Saillant. Houston: Arte Público Press, 2002, pp. 214-39.

“The Américo Paredes Papers,” The Journal of South Texas 15, no. 2 (Fall 2002): 14-31.

“Introduction,” In Mexican Americans in Texas History, Edited by Emilio Zamora, Cynthia Orozco, and Rodolfo Rocha. Austin: Texas State Historical Association, 2000.  I was the principal author of the “Introduction.”

“Mutualist and Mexicanist Expressions of a Mexican Political Culture in Texas,” In Mexican Americans in Texas History, Edited by Emilio Zamora, Cynthia Orozco, and Rodolfo Rocha. Austin: Texas State Historical Association, 2000.

“Jose de La Luz Saenz, 1888-1951,” El Mesteño,Vol. 3, Issue 31 (April 2000), 4-5.

 

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