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Jacqueline Jones, Chair 128 Inner Campus Dr., Stop B7000, GAR 1.104 Austin, TX 78712-1739 • 512-471-3261

Julie Hardwick

Professor Ph.D., 1991, Johns Hopkins University

Julie Hardwick

Contact

  • Phone: 512-475-7221
  • Office: GAR 3.112
  • Office Hours: Fall 2014: T 11 am.-1 p.m. & by appointment
  • Campus Mail Code: B7000

Biography

Research interests

Early modern social and economic history, legal history, and women's & family history.

Courses taught

Early modern European history,  gender/family and legal history.

HIS 343W • Witches, Workers, And Wives

39565 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 930am-1100am WEL 2.304
(also listed as EUS 346, WGS 345 )
show description

Our stereotypical image of an early modern woman is a witch - for some good reasons because thousands of witch trials took place.  In this course, we will look beyond that perspective to explore the complex of material, political, and cultural factors that shaped experiences of gender and family and that shaped attitudes about gender and power in early modern Europe.  The early modern centuries between about 1500 and 1800 were years of tremendous change in many ways - religious reformations, European governments became more powerful at home and established colonies world wide, economic transformation as people became consumers and production expanded exponentially.  Some features were slower to change, however, especially with regard to family life.  In this class, we will explore how women's experiences of these patterns compared to men's - whether as workers, consumers, criminals, political subjects and political actors, peasants or nobles, spouses or parents.  Along the way, we will explore why some of these dynamics fed into a proliferation of "witches."

Texts

Discussion of the assigned readings (see below) will be an important element of this class: you will learn more effectively when you take an active part in the analysis of the material to be covered.  Consequently you must expect to read every reading assignment very carefully and thoughtfully.  You should come to each class ready to ask questions and contribute observations.

You will need to demonstrate mastery of the readings to do well on the exams. 

Warning: absence from class will inevitably have a serious impact on your grade because you cannot participate if you are not present. Each of you may be absent twice with no penalty.  For every absence after that, three points will be deducted from your participation grade for each absence not justified by a written explanation. Please note, however, that attendance is the only the first prerequisite for participation, so that perfect attendance and complete silence will result in a grade that reflects only partial fulfillment of participation.

Daily class readings are available on electronic reserve (ER) or online through the Library Catalogue (both accessible through the library homepage) or in a xerox packet.  

Grading

Midterm     25%

Final       35%

Reading grids 20%

Witchcraft group projects   10%

Participation  10%         

 

HIS 387M • Making The Early Modern World

39905 • Fall 2014
Meets TH 200pm-500pm GAR 2.124
show description

The years between 1450 and the late 18th century saw many kinds of broad and wide reaching transformations across the early modern world.  Europeans established colonies across the globe, and complex colonial societies developed.  Political systems evolved as highly centralized monarchies emerged in which metropolitan and colonial issues were integrated. Merchant capitalism became the dominant form of economic organization, manufacturing grew both within the guild system and without in new rural zones of domestic industry, and a consumer revolution began.  Elites sought to redefine and re-legitimize their positions as courtiers, judges, and financiers.  Longstanding epistemological assumptions were challenged in elite intellectual communities and in artisanal workshops. New technologies (printing, military changes and others)  introduced new dynamics. Christianity fragmented into multiple denominations with immense political as well as religious implications for clergy and laity, states and individuals. Gender issues were a central theme in experiences of and articulations of many of these developments. Commodities, ideas, and peoples circulated in elaborate networks around the Atlantic.  And so on and so on.

     In this class, we will conduct a semester-long workshop about the making of the early modern world. Combining reading and research, we will read some samples of important work on key early modern topics and undertake research exercises on a wide variety of primary source materials to broaden our perspectives on what kinds of material is available and how it can be used.  Students will prepare short conference length papers (about 12-15 pages).  We will have a mini-conference around these papers, and then conclude the semester with expanded and revised papers.

     Students interested in any aspect of early modern history, whether the Atlantic world or the medieval to early modern transition as well as more purely early modern topics, are welcome. Students are welcome to work research topics from either side of the Atlantic, i.e. from colonial Latin, British or French America as well as Europe. (Students in this class previously have worked on a wide variety of European topics, on Muslims in Grenada, on colonies in Mexico, the Caribbean basin and British North America.)

    Students may count this class as either research or reading. Obviously, papers for research credit should be based around interpretation of appropriate primary source material.

Grading:

* Conscientious class preparation and engaged participation.

* Research exercises.  For each of the first few meetings, we will read some samples of important work on key early modern topics and undertake research exercises on a wide variety of primary source material.    These will include weekly short three page papers assessing source issues and research possibilities as well as a sampling and database construction for 100 cases the week we look at court records.

* c. 12-15 page paper for conference, followed by substantive revision for final paper.

 * Participation in mini-conference as presenter and questioner.

•    Engaged participation in discussion of readings & mini-conference 10%

•    Research exercises  30%Research paper   60%

HIS F343W • Witches, Workers, And Wives

84995 • Summer 2014
Meets MTWTHF 1130am-100pm WEL 2.304
(also listed as EUS F346, WGS F345 )
show description

Our stereotypical image of an early modern woman is a witch - for some good reasons because thousands of witch trials took place.  In this course, we will look beyond that perspective to explore the complex of material, political, and cultural factors that shaped experiences of gender and family and that shaped attitudes about gender and power in early modern Europe.  The early modern centuries between about 1500 and 1800 were years of tremendous change in many ways - religious reformations, European governments became more powerful at home and established colonies world wide, economic transformation as people became consumers and production expanded exponentially.  Some features were slower to change, however, especially with regard to family life.  In this class, we will explore how women's experiences of these patterns compared to men's - whether as workers, consumers, criminals, political subjects and political actors, peasants or nobles, spouses or parents.  Along the way, we will explore why some of these dynamics fed into a proliferation of "witches."

Texts

Discussion of the assigned readings (see below) will be an important element of this class: you will learn more effectively when you take an active part in the analysis of the material to be covered.  Consequently you must expect to read every reading assignment very carefully and thoughtfully.  You should come to each class ready to ask questions and contribute observations.

You will need to demonstrate mastery of the readings to do well on the exams. 

Warning: absence from class will inevitably have a serious impact on your grade because you cannot participate if you are not present. Each of you may be absent twice with no penalty.  For every absence after that, three points will be deducted from your participation grade for each absence not justified by a written explanation. Please note, however, that attendance is the only the first prerequisite for participation, so that perfect attendance and complete silence will result in a grade that reflects only partial fulfillment of participation.

Daily class readings are available on electronic reserve (ER) or online through the Library Catalogue (both accessible through the library homepage) or in a xerox packet.  

Grading

Midterm     25%

Final       35%

Reading grids 20%

Witchcraft group projects   10%

Participation  10%        

HIS 383C • Lit Eur Hist: Early Mod Per

40143 • Fall 2013
Meets T 900am-1200pm BEN 1.118
show description

Literature of the Early Modern Period

The years between 1400 and 1750 saw many kinds of broad and extraordinary transformations for Western Europe.  Europeans established colonies across the globe.  Political systems evolved as highly centralized monarchies replaced the fragmented political authority characteristic of feudalism.  The economies of European countries saw large scale changes as merchant capitalism expanded to become the dominant form of economic organization, manufacturing grew both within the guild system and without in new rural zones of domestic industry.  Populations slowly recovered to the levels reached before the Black Death of 1348-1353 and, from the late fifteenth century began to grow to unprecedented levels.  More and more people lived in towns and cities.  Elites sought to redefine and re-legitimize their positions as courtiers, judges, and financiers as the new technologies of warfare transformed military operations.  Scientists and writers created a vibrant intellectual community whose debates and discoveries remade epistemological assumptions that had prevailed for centuries.  The Catholic Church's centuries' old claim to a monopoly on Christian orthodoxy was finally and irrevocably undermined with the emergence of numerous Protestant denominations after Martin Luther's break with Rome in 1517.  Both Catholic and Protestant Reformations reshaped spiritual life and organization for clergy and laity alike. Elites and working people began to adopt new means of dispute resolution.  These myriad changes provide some of the markers of the development of modern society, and historians have learned to ask who exactly participated in these processes and how gender as well as factors such as religion, class, place of residence shaped their impact.

 This seminar offers an introduction to main themes and methods in early modern European historiography, as reflected in the work of the last forty years or so.  It aims both to introduce some of the "greatest hits" of this field and to provide some indicators of current directions. It is structured to allow students ample opportunity to pursue readings in the areas of particular interest to them.

HIS 343W • Witches, Workers, And Wives

39325 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm WEL 2.304
(also listed as EUS 346, WGS 345 )
show description

Our stereotypical image of an early modern woman is a witch - for some good reasons because thousands of witch trials took place. In this course, we will look beyond that perspective to explore the complex of material, political, and cultural factors that shaped experiences of gender and family and that shaped attitudes about gender and power in early modern Europe. The early modern centuries between about 1500 and 1800 were years of tremendous change in many ways - religious reformations, European governments became more powerful at home and established colonies world wide, economic transformation as people became consumers and production expanded exponentially. Some features were slower to change, however, especially with regard to family life. In this class, we will explore how women's experiences of these patterns compared to men's - whether as workers, consumers, criminals, political subjects and political actors, peasants or nobles, spouses or parents. Along the way, we will explore why some of these dynamics fed into a proliferation of "witches."

HIS 317N • Thinking Like A Historian

39235 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm GAR 1.122
show description

Thinking Like a Historian is a sophomore seminar for History majors.  The class will introduce students to history research as a professional discipline: research methods, types of sources, historiography, and structure of research papers.  Students will read  a wide range of primary sources, examine how different historians have developed competing interpretations of particular topics, and develop a research project.  Students write a variety of very short papers, do a group project, and provide a written framework for their research projects.  

 

Readings will include primary sources posted on BlackBoard and articles available in electronic versions through the PCL website.

Texts:

Natalie Zemon Davis, The Return of Martin Guerre (Harvard University Press, 1984)

Eric Hinderaker, The Two Hendricks: Unraveling a Mohawk Mystery (Harvard University Press, 2011)

James E. Crisp, Sleuthing the Alamo: Davy Crockett’s Last Stand and Other Mysteries of the Texas Revolution (Oxford University Press, 2005)

 

Grading:

Six short papers 30%

Group project 20%

Research project framework 30%

Participation 20%

HIS 350L • Law/Society Early Mod Europe

39390 • Fall 2011
Meets MW 330pm-500pm GAR 2.128
(also listed as EUS 346, WGS 340 )
show description

This research seminar will focus on how historians have explored the significance of law, criminal and civil, in the lives of early modern Europeans. We will explore how historians have used legal records to explore patterns of criminality (which were very highly gendered at the time, for example infanticide and fornication for women and drunkenness and theft for men) and rapidly growing rates of civil litigation (for instance over debt, slander and family disputes of various kinds).   We will investigate how historians have used court cases to examine a wide variety of issues for which few other sources survive, especially in terms of everyday social, cultural and economic patterns for families and communities.  We will combine reading the work of historians with our own readings of cases as preliminaries to research projects in which students will work on a case of their own choosing for their term papers.

 

Grading:

Research papers 60% (5% proposal, 20% paper, 35% revised paper)

Peer review of research paper 5%

Group projects 20%

Participation 15% (attendance, informed discussion, engagement with

presentations, leading discussion)

 

Reading:

Readings will be assigned for most class meetings in the first part of the semester until we move to working on the research projects.  The readings will be a mixture of journal articles (available on line through the PCL website), original legal documents (posted on BlackBoard) and a course packet to be purchased.

For some basic background into early modern Europe, I recommend: Euan Cameron, ed., Early Modern Europe: an Oxford History (in the PCL and widely available on line either new or used). 

HIS S343W • Witches, Workers, And Wives

85660 • Summer 2011
Meets MTWTHF 1000am-1130am WEL 2.304
(also listed as EUS S346, WGS S345 )
show description

Our stereotypical image of an early modern woman is a witch - for some good reasons because thousands of witch trials took place.  In this course, we will look beyond that perspective to explore the complex of material, political, and cultural factors that shaped experiences of gender and family and that shaped attitudes about gender and power in early modern Europe.  The early modern centuries between about 1500 and 1800 were years of tremendous change in many ways - religious reformations, European governments became more powerful at home and established colonies world wide, economic transformation as people became consumers and production expanded exponentially.  Some features were slower to change, however, especially with regard to family life.  In this class, we will explore how women's experiences of these patterns compared to men's - whether as workers, consumers, criminals, political subjects and political actors, peasants or nobles, spouses or parents.  Along the way, we will explore why some of these dynamics fed into a proliferation of "witches."

Texts

Discussion of the assigned readings (see below) will be an important element of this class: you will learn more effectively when you take an active part in the analysis of the material to be covered.  Consequently you must expect to read every reading assignment very carefully and thoughtfully.  You should come to each class ready to ask questions and contribute observations.

You will need to demonstrate mastery of the readings to do well on the exams. 

Warning: absence from class will inevitably have a serious impact on your grade because you cannot participate if you are not present. Each of you may be absent twice with no penalty.  For every absence after that, three points will be deducted from your participation grade for each absence not justified by a written explanation. Please note, however, that attendance is the only the first prerequisite for participation, so that perfect attendance and complete silence will result in a grade that reflects only partial fulfillment of participation.

Daily class readings are available on electronic reserve (ER) or online through the Library Catalogue (both accessible through the library homepage) or in a xerox packet.  

 

Grading

Midterm     25%

Final       35%

Reading grids 20%

Witchcraft group projects   10%

Participation  10%          

HIS 343W • Witches, Workers, And Wives

39606 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 930am-1100am WAG 201
(also listed as EUS 346, WGS 345 )
show description

Our stereotypical image of an early modern woman is a witch - for some good reasons because thousands of witch trials took place.  In this course, we will look beyond that perspective to explore the complex of material, political, and cultural factors that shaped experiences of gender and family and that shaped attitudes about gender and power in early modern Europe.  The early modern centuries between about 1500 and 1800 were years of tremendous change in many ways - religious reformations, European governments became more powerful at home and established colonies world wide, economic transformation as people became consumers and production expanded exponentially.  Some features were slower to change, however, especially with regard to family life.  In this class, we will explore how women's experiences of these patterns compared to men's - whether as workers, consumers, criminals, political subjects and political actors, peasants or nobles, spouses or parents.  Along the way, we will explore why some of these dynamics fed into a proliferation of "witches."

Texts

Discussion of the assigned readings (see below) will be an important element of this class: you will learn more effectively when you take an active part in the analysis of the material to be covered.  Consequently you must expect to read every reading assignment very carefully and thoughtfully.  You should come to each class ready to ask questions and contribute observations.

You will need to demonstrate mastery of the readings to do well on the exams. 

Warning: absence from class will inevitably have a serious impact on your grade because you cannot participate if you are not present. Each of you may be absent twice with no penalty.  For every absence after that, three points will be deducted from your participation grade for each absence not justified by a written explanation. Please note, however, that attendance is the only the first prerequisite for participation, so that perfect attendance and complete silence will result in a grade that reflects only partial fulfillment of participation.

Daily class readings are available on electronic reserve (ER) or online through the Library Catalogue (both accessible through the library homepage) or in a xerox packet.  

Grading

Midterm     25%

Final       35%

Reading grids 20%

Witchcraft group projects   10%

Participation  10%         

 

HIS 383M • Gend/Fam/Sexlty Early Mod Atl

39580 • Fall 2010
Meets W 200pm-500pm GAR 2.124
show description

The family was a critical social unit in early modern (c. 1500-1800) Europe, as well as a locus of political and cultural contestation.  Around the early modern Atlantic, a conceptual as well as a physical space inhabited by Europeans, native Americans, and Africans in North and South America, Europe, and the Caribbean, “the family” or familial relations became a way of articulating and experiencing crucial changes and developments. This seminar will examine the role of family, and by extension marriage and sexuality, in the context of Transatlantic imperialism and colonialism, the economy of credit and debt, the Reformation and counter-reformation, racial ideologies and practices, and the absolutist, colonial, and emergent democratic states. We will read closely in the scholarly literature that emphasizes the cultural significance of family forms across space and time.

Grading

Participation. 20%  Class participation is essential.  

Response papers (5 pages each). 40% These papers should reflect your intellectual response to the assigned readings in one of the previous weeks. You may reflect on how the readings interact with and inform one another, or how they shed light on previous readings. 

Historiographical paper.  40%   

Texts

Julia Adams, The Familial State: Ruling Families And Merchant Capitalism In Early Modern Europe  (Cornell, 2005). 

John Demos, The Unredeemed Captive: A Family Story from Early America (Vintage).

Ramon Guttierez, When Jesus Came, the Corn Mothers Went Away: Marriage, Sexuality, and Power in New Mexico, 1500-1846  (Stanford University Press, 1991).

Julie Hardwick, The Practice of Patriarchy: Gender and the Politics of Household Authority in Early Modern France (Penn State, 1998).

Ronald Hoffman and Sally Mason, Princes of Ireland, Planters of Maryland: A Carroll Saga, 1500-1782 (UNC, 2000).

Barry Levy, Quakers and the American Family : British Settlement in the Delaware Valley (Oxford, 1992).

Ann Marie Plane, Colonial Intimacies:  Indian Marriage in Early New England (Cornell, 2002).

Karen Vieira Powers, Women in the Crucible of Conquest: The Gendered Genesis of Spanish American Society, 1500-1600  (University of New Mexico Press, 2005).

Lyndal Roper, The Holy Household : Women and Morals in Reformation Augsburg  (Oxford, 1991).

Ann Twinam, Public Lives, Private Secrets: Gender, Honor, Sexuality, and Illegitimacy in Colonial Spanish America (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1999).

 

 

HIS 387M • Making The Early Modern World

39990 • Spring 2010
Meets W 200pm-500pm GAR 1.134
show description

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of the graduate adviser.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

 

HIS 350L • Law/Society Early Mod Eur-W

40095 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 1100-1230pm GAR 1.134
show description

This research seminar will focus on how historians have explored the significance of law, criminal and civil, in the lives of early modern Europeans. We will explore both how historians have used legal records and patterns of criminality and the implications of very high rates of civil litigation (for instance over debt, slander and family disputes of various kinds). We will emphasize issues about the intersection of family life and law. We will combine reading the work of historians with our own readings of cases as preliminaries to research projects in which students will work on a case of their own choosing for their term papers.

Requirements:

1) Conscientious reading and active, informed participation. Students will take turns as discussion starters. You cannot participate if you do not attend class, so every unexcused absence after the first two will result in a penalty of three points off the participation grade. Please note, however, that attendance is the only the first prerequisite for participation, so that perfect attendance and complete silence will result in a poor grade.
2) Writing: Students will write a 12-15 page research paper in three stages (a two page prospectus, a graded paper, and a compulsory revision).
3) Group projects on primary sources for oral presentations and a written product.

Notes:

If you need any accommodation under the provisions of the ADA act, please inform the instructor as soon as possible.

Students are expected to uphold irreproachable standards of academic integrity. I will assign the penalty of a 0 score for any form of academic dishonesty (cheating, plagiarism etc). The Office of the Dean of Students maintains an excellent website about academic honesty policies at UT.
Note: NO website may be used for papers or projects in this class without the explicit permission of the instructor. Any such unauthorized use constitutes academic dishonesty. Unauthorized use of websites for papers or projects will result in a 0 score for the paper.

Grading:

Research papers 60% (5% proposal, 20% paper, 35% revised paper)
Peer review of research paper 5%
Group projects 20%
Participation 15% (attendance, informed discussion, engagement with
presentations, leading discussion)

• Please note that this class, like other undergraduate courses at UT, will now utilize plus and minus options for final grades. The scale will be:
A 93-100; A- 90-92; B+ 87-89; B 83-86; B- 80-82; C+ 77-79; C 73-76; C- 70-72; D+ 67-69; D 63-66; D- 60-62; F 59 or lower.

Reading:

* The following book should be purchased:

James R. Farr, A Tale of Two Murders: Passion and Power in Seventeenth-Century France

* A number of readings are available in a Xerox packet from IT Copying at Nueces and MLK.

* A number of readings have been placed on Electronic Reserve (password “execution”).

If you feel as if you need some basic background into early modern Europe, I recommend:
Euan Cameron, ed., Early Modern Europe: an Oxford History (widely available on line either new or used).

Date Topic

8/27 Introductions

9/1 The many laws of early modern Europe

9/3 Some starting points: litigation
READING Julie Hardwick, Family Business selections (packet)
James R. Farr, A Tale of Two Murders pp.ix-27.

9/8 Some starting points: criminality
READING James R. Farr, A Tale of Two Murders pp.28-204

9/10 Law library orientation Meet at the law school

9/15 Reading the cases I
READING Cohens, eds., Words and Deeds in Renaissance Rome (ER),

9/17 Reading the cases II
READING Kagan and Dyer, eds., Inquisitorial Inquiries (ER)

Defining a Crime

9/22 Different perspectives
Peter Linebaugh, The London Hanged selections (packet)

9/24 What makes a “criminal?”
Ulrinka Rublack, The Crimes of Women in Early Modern Germany selections (packet)
Peter Linebaugh, The London Hanged selections (packet)

Law as a took of state discipline, law as a tool of popular agency

9/29 State goals
READING: Hanley, “Engendering the State.” (ER)
Bruce Lenman and Geoffrey Parker, “State, Community, and Criminal Law.” (ER).

10/1 Law in action
READING Hindle, The State and Social Change selections (packet)

10/6 Law and agency
READING Sarah Maza, “Domestic Melodrama as Political Ideology: The Case of the Comte de Sanois,” American Historical Review, 94 (December 1989). (Journal available on line through UT library website.)
Robert Shoemaker, “The Decline of Public Insult in London, 1660-1800”, Past and Present, (2000) (Journal available on line through UT library website.)

10/8 Group project day Meet at the law library

10/13 Representation and reality
READING: Joy Wiltenburg, "True Crime: The Origins of Modern Sensationalism," American Historical Review 109 (December 2004): 1377-1404. (Journal available on line through UT library website.)
Natalie Zemon Davis, Fiction in the Archives selections (packet)

10/15 Rape and infanticide
READING: Alfred Soman, “The Anatomy of an Infanticide Trail: the Case of Marie-Jeanne Bartonnet.” (ER)
Garthine Walker, ‘Rereading Rape and Sexual Violence in Early Modern England’, Gender & History, 10, 1 (1998): 1-25. (Journal available on line through UT library website.
Ulrinka Rublack, The Crimes of Women in Early Modern Germany selections (packet)

10/20 Group project presentations

10/22 Group project presentations

10/27 Declaring pregnancies
READING: Julie Hardwick, “Sex and the (seventeenth-century) city: a research note towards a long history of leisure,” Leisure Studies 4 (October 2008). (Journal available on line through UT library website.)
Jacques Depauw, "Illicit Sexual Activity and Society in Eighteen-Century Nantes." (ER)
Hardwick documents (ER)

10/29 The Mary Blandy Case
READING Pamphlets in the special collections room at the
Law Library

11/3 Individual paper proposals due – brief presentation
and 2 page proposal

11/5 Individual meetings

11/10 Individual meetings

11/12 Paper workshops

11/17 Paper workshops

11/19 Paper workshops

11/24 Paper workshops

11/26 THANKSGIVING

12/1 Individual meetings

12/3 Wrap: Final paper due

HIS 343W • Witches, Workers, And Wives

39045 • Spring 2009
Meets TTH 1100-1230pm WEL 2.304
(also listed as EUS 346, WGS 345 )
show description

HIS 343W    Witches, Workers and Wives    Spring 2009
Julie Hardwick

Course Description
Our stereotypical image of an early modern woman is a witch - for some good reasons because thousands of witch trials took place. In this course, we will look beyond that perspective to explore the complex of material, political, and cultural factors that shaped experiences of gender and family and that shaped attitudes about gender and power in early modern Europe. The early modern centuries between about 1500 and 1800 were years of tremendous change in many ways - religious reformations, European governments became more powerful at home and established colonies world wide, economic transformation as people became consumers and production expanded exponentially. Some features were slower to change, however, especially with regard to family life. In this class, we will explore how women's experiences of these patterns compared to men's - whether as workers, consumers, criminals, political subjects and political actors, peasants or nobles, spouses or parents. Along the way, we will explore why some of these dynamics fed into a proliferation of "witches."

Grading Policy
Assignments may include: responses to readings, one paper, exams, and a group project.

Texts
Readings may include the following books and a number of articles:
Judith Bennett, Ale, Beer, and Brewsters: Women's Work in a Changing World, 1300-1600
Steven Ozment, The Burgermeister's Daughter: Scandal in a Sixteenth-Century German Town
Joseph Klaits, Servants of Satan: The Age of the Witch Hunts
The Memoirs of Gluckel of Hameln, Robert Rosen., ed.

Publications

BOOK: Family Business: litigation and the political ecnomies of daily life in seventeenth-century France, (Oxford University Press, 2009).

CHAPTER: "The Family and the State," in Sandra Cavello, editor, A Cultural History of Childhood and Family in the early modern age, (in production; Berg, 2009).

CHAPTER: "Between State and Street: Witnesses and the Family Politics of Litigation in Early Modern France," Family, Gender, and Law in early modern France, ed. by Suzanne Desan and Jeffrey Merrick (Penn State University Press, 2009).

ARTICLE: "Review of Meat Matters: Butchers, Politics, and Market Culture in Eighteenth-Century Paris," H-France 9(77), (June, 2009).

ARTICLE: "Sex and the (seventeenth-century) century city: a research note towards the long history of leisure," Leisure Studies, (October, 2008).

ARTICLE: "Review of The familial state: ruling families and merchant capitalism in early modern Europe," American Historical Review, (April, 2007).

ARTICLE: "Review of Between Crown and Community: Politics and Civic Culture in Sixteenth-Century Poitiers," Journal of Modern History, 78(4), 954-955, (December, 2006).

BOOK: The Practice of Patriarchy: Gender and the Politics of Household Authority in early modern France, (Published simultaneously in cloth and paper, Penn State Press, 1998).

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