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Alan Tully, Chair 128 Inner Campus Dr., Stop B7000, GAR 1.104 Austin, TX 78712-1739 • 512-471-3261

Alan Tully

Professor Ph.D., 1973, Johns Hopkins University

Professor; Chair, History Department: Eugene C. Barker Centennial Professorship in American History
Alan Tully

Contact

  • Phone: 512-471-3261
  • Office: GAR 1.106A
  • Office Hours: Spring 20143: T 10 a.m.- 12 p.m.
  • Campus Mail Code: B7000

Biography

Research interests

He is a scholar of Early American History.

HIS 317L • Colonial America

39440 • Fall 2014
Meets T 500pm-800pm GAR 3.116
show description

This course examines the chief characteristics of Anglo-American culture from the initial permanent English settlement of British North America in the early seventeenth century to the emergence of provincial societies in the mid-eighteenth century.  Its theme is the settlement and unsettlement of North America as migrants from Europe and Africa mingled with aboriginals already in the New World.  We will look comparatively at different colonizing experiments in North America and the Caribbean, in order to comprehend the varied and often international context within which colonial history took place. At he same time, we will look for the values that shaped early American institutions and social norms and examine them against alternatives both that other contemporary societies offered and that the circumstances of colonial life suggested.  In doing so we will attempt to understand how environment and experience shaped distinctive new world cultures.

 

This course may be used to fulfill three hours of the U.S. history component of the university core curriculum and addresses the following four core objectives established by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board: communication skills, critical thinking skills, personal responsibility, and social responsibility.

Texts:

Richard Middleton and Anne Lombard, Colonial America. A History, 1565-1776, 4th edition (Oxford, 2011).

Richard Dunn, Sugar and Slaves: The Rise of the Planter Class in the English West Indies, 1624-1713 (Chapel Hill, 1972; 2000).

Benjamin Franklin, Autobiography. Various editions. [Joyce Chaplin ed., Norton Critical Edition (New York, 2012)].

Anthony S. Parent Jr., Foul Means:  The Formation of Slave Society in Virginia, 1660 -1740 (Chapel Hill, 2003).

John Woolman,  Journal.  Various editions. [Phillips P. Moulton, The Journal and Major Essays (Richmond, IN 1971, 2007]

Alternative books for essay #3

Fred Anderson, The War that Made America: A Short History of the French and Indian War (New York, 2005).

Evan Haefeli and Kevin Sweeny, Captors and Captives: the 1704 French and Indian Raid on Deerfield (Boston, 2003)

Laurel Thatcher Ulrich, A Midwife’s Tale:  the Life of Martha Ballard, Based on her Diary, 1785-1812 (New York, 1990).

Daniel Vickers, Farmers and Fishermen:  Two Centuries of Work in Essex County Massachusetts, 1630-1850 (Chapel Hill, 1994).

Grading:

Essay on assigned primary sources (5 pages) – 15%

Comparative essay on Dunn and Parent (7 pages) – 25%

Comparative essay on either Ulrich and Vickers or Anderson and Haefeli & Sweeney

(7 pages) – 25%

Class discussion participation - 10%

End-of-Term Examination – 25%

Final marks will include a plus and minus range.

HIS 317L • Colonial America

39735 • Spring 2014
Meets T 500pm-800pm GAR 3.116
show description

This course examines the chief characteristics of Anglo-American culture from the initial permanent English settlement of British North America in the early seventeenth century to the emergence of provincial societies in the mid-eighteenth century.  Its theme is the settlement and unsettlement of North America as migrants from Europe and Africa mingled with aboriginals already in the New World.  We will look comparatively at different colonizing experiments in North America and the Caribbean, in order to comprehend the varied and often international context within which colonial history took place. At he same time, we will look for the values that shaped early American institutions and social norms and examine them against alternatives both that other contemporary societies offered and that the circumstances of colonial life suggested.  In doing so we will attempt to understand how environment and experience shaped distinctive new world cultures.

Texts:

Richard Middleton and Anne Lombard, Colonial America. A History, 1565-1776, 4th edition (Oxford, 2011).

Richard Dunn, Sugar and Slaves: The Rise of the Planter Class in the English West Indies, 1624-1713 (Chapel Hill, 1972; 2000).

Benjamin Franklin, Autobiography. Various editions. [Joyce Chaplin ed., Norton Critical Edition (New York, 2012)].

Anthony S. Parent Jr., Foul Means:  The Formation of Slave Society in Virginia, 1660 -1740 (Chapel Hill, 2003).

John Woolman,  Journal.  Various editions. [Phillips P. Moulton, The Journal and Major Essays (Richmond, IN 1971, 2007]Alternative books for essay #3Fred Anderson, The War that Made America: A Short History of the French and Indian War (New York, 2005).

Evan Haefeli and Kevin Sweeny, Captors and Captives: the 1704 French and Indian Raid on Deerfield (Boston, 2003)

Laurel Thatcher Ulrich, A Midwife’s Tale:  the Life of Martha Ballard, Based on her Diary, 1785-1812 (New York, 1990).

Daniel Vickers, Farmers and Fishermen:  Two Centuries of Work in Essex County Massachusetts, 1630-1850 (Chapel Hill, 1994).

Grading:

Essay on assigned primary sources (5 pages) – 15%

Comparative essay on Dunn and Parent (7 pages) – 25%

Comparative essay on either Ulrich and Vickers or Anderson and Haefeli & Sweeney (7 pages) – 25%

Class discussion participation - 10%

End-of-Term Examination – 25%

Final marks will include a plus and minus range.

HIS 317L • Colonial America

39385 • Spring 2013
Meets T 500pm-800pm GAR 3.116
show description

This course examines the chief characteristics of Anglo-American culture from the initial permanent English settlement of British North America in the early seventeenth century to the emergence of provincial societies in the mid-eighteenth century.  Its theme is the settlement and unsettlement of North America as migrants from Europe and Africa mingled with aboriginals already in the New World.  We will look comparatively at different colonizing experiments in North America and the Caribbean, in order to comprehend the varied and often international context within which colonial history took place. At he same time, we will look for the values that shaped early American institutions and social norms and examine them against alternatives both that other contemporary societies offered and that the circumstances of colonial life suggested.  In doing so we will attempt to understand how environment and experience shaped distinctive new world cultures.

Course Requirements

Essay on assigned primary sources (5 pages) – 15%

Comparative essay on Dunn and Parent (7 pages) – 25%

Comparative essay on either Ulrich and Vickers or Anderson and Haefeli & Sweeney

(7 pages) – 25%

Class discussion participation - 10%

End-of-Term Examination – 25%

Final marks will include a plus and minus range.

Readings:

The following books are available at the Bookstore.

Richard Middleton and Anne Lombard, Colonial America. A History, 1565-1776,

4th edition (Oxford, 2011).

Richard Dunn, Sugar and Slaves: The Rise of the Planter Class in the English West Indies, 1624-1713 (Chapel Hill, 1972; 2000).

Benjamin Franklin, Autobiography. Various editions. [Joyce Chaplin ed., Norton Critical Edition (New York, 2012)].

Anthony S. Parent Jr., Foul Means:  The Formation of Slave Society in Virginia, 1660 -1740 (Chapel Hill, 2003).

Erik R. Seeman,  The Huron-Wendat Feast of the Dead: Indian-European Encounters in Early North America (Baltimore, 2011).

John Woolman,  Journal.  Various editions. [Phillips P. Moulton, The Journal and Major Essays (Richmond, IN 1971, 2007]

 

Alternative books for essay #3

Fred Anderson, The War that Made America: A Short History of the French and Indian War (New York, 2005).

Evan Haefeli and Kevin Sweeny, Captors and Captives: the 1704 French and Indian Raid on Deerfield (Boston, 2003)

 Laurel Thatcher Ulrich, A Midwife’s Tale:  the Life of Martha Ballard, Based on her Diary, 1785-1812 (New York, 1990).

Daniel Vickers, Farmers and Fishermen:  Two Centuries of Work in Essex County Massachusetts, 1630-1850 (Chapel Hill, 1994).

 Course Packet (articles by Greene, Haefeli, Kupperman, and Manke)

 

 

HIS 317L • Colonial America

39215 • Spring 2012
Meets T 500pm-800pm GAR 3.116
show description

This course examines the chief characteristics of Anglo-American culture from the initial permanent English settlement of British North America in the early seventeenth century to the emergence of provincial societies in the mid-eighteenth century.  Its theme is the settlement and unsettlement of North America as migrants from Europe and Africa mingled with aboriginals already in the New World.  We will look comparatively at different colonizing experiments in North America and the Caribbean, in order to comprehend the varied and often international context within which colonial history took place. At he same time, we will look for the values that shaped early American institutions and social norms and examine them against alternatives both that other contemporary societies offered and that the circumstances of colonial life suggested.  In doing so we will attempt to understand how environment and experience shaped distinctive new world cultures.

Course Requirements

All students will attend weekly lectures and discussions that take place in the third class hour.  Discussions will focus on the assigned readings and students will be expected to participate actively. Participation marks will be based on attendance and the instructor’s evaluation of student contributions to discussion. Students are responsible for lecture material along with that contained in the required readings and for any changes to the syllabus that are announced in class.  Although there is some overlap between texts and lectures, lectures do not simply repeat material in the readings. I do not provide copies of lectures and attendees are prohibited from recording lectures and discussions.  A schedule of the required readings is attached.

Written Work:  Students will hand in three short essays.  The first will be a 5-page paper on the following assignment.  By comparing the testimonies of Olaudah Equiano, with that of EITHER James Albert Ukawsaw Gronniosaw OR John Marrant, discuss the most important ways these writers contested the institution of slavery. Their autobiographical writings are in Vincent Carretta, ed., Unchained Voices.  The second is a comparison of Parts I and II of Winthrop Jordan,White Over Black, and Anthony Parent, Foul Means.  The third is a comparison of EITHER Laurel Thatcher Ulrich, A Midwife’s Tale, and Marylynn Salmon, Women and the Law of Property OR Fred Anderson, A People’s Army and Peter Silver, Our Savage Neighbors.  These papers will be a maximum of 7 pages. You may choose to hand in ONE of these papers up to a week late. Essays later than one week will be credited as work completed but will receive a mark of zero.

Examination:  The final examination will cover all material addressed in class and all readings assigned for essays or for consideration in the classroom.  We will discuss the nature of the examinations and essays in class. 

Marking Scheme:

Essay on assigned primary sources (5 pages) – 15%

Comparative essay on Jordan and Parent (7 pages) – 25%

Comparative essay on either Ulrich and Salmon or Anderson and Silver (7 pages) – 25%

Class discussion participation - 10%

End-of-Term Examination – 25%

Final marks will include a plus and minus range.

Texts:

The following books are available at the Bookstore.

Richard Middleton, Colonial America. A History, 1565-1776, 3rd edition (Oxford, 2002).

Fred Anderson, A People’s Army.  Massachusetts Soldiers and Society in the Seven Years War (Chapel Hill, 1984).

Vincent Carretta, ed., Unchained Voices:  An Anthology of Black Authors in the English Speaking World of the Eighteenth Century (Kentucky, 1996).

Richard Dunn, Sugar and Slaves: The Rise of the Planter Class in the English West Indies, 1624-1713 (Chapel Hill, 1972; 2000).

Winthrop D. Jordan, White Over Black:  American Attitudes Toward the Negro, 1550-1812 (Chapel Hill, 1968, 2000).

Anthony S. Parent Jr., Foul Means:  the Formation of Slave Society in Virginia, 1660 -1740 (Chapel Hill, 2003).

Marylynn Salmon, Women and the Law of Property in Early America (Chapel Hill, 1986)

Peter Silver, Our Savage Neighbors:  How Indian War Transformed Early America (New York, 2008).

Laurel Thatcher Ulrich, A Midwife’s Tale:  the Life of Martha Ballard, Based on her Diary, 1785-1812 (New York, 1990).

Course Packet (articles by Greene, Kupperman, and Olson) 

HIS 317L • Colonial America

39470 • Spring 2011
Meets T 500pm-800pm GAR 3.116
show description

 

This course examines the chief characteristics of Anglo-American culture from the initial permanent English settlement of British North America in the early seventeenth century to the emergence of provincial societies in the mid-eighteenth century.  Its theme is the settlement and unsettlement of North America as migrants from Europe and Africa mingled with aboriginals already in the New World.  We will look comparatively at different colonizing experiments in North America and the Caribbean, in order to comprehend the varied and often international context within which colonial history took place. At he same time, we will look for the values that shaped early American institutions and social norms and examine them against alternatives both that other contemporary societies offered and that the circumstances of colonial life suggested.  In doing so we will attempt to understand how environment and experience shaped distinctive new world cultures.

 

 

Course Requirements

 

All students will attend weekly lectures and discussions that take place in the third class hour.  Discussions will focus on the assigned readings and students will be expected to participate actively. Participation marks will be based on attendance and the instructor’s evaluation of student contributions to discussion. Students are responsible for lecture material along with that contained in the required readings and for any changes to the syllabus that are announced in class.  Although there is some overlap between texts and lectures, lectures do not simply repeat material in the readings. I do not provide copies of lectures and attendees are prohibited from recording lectures and discussions.  A schedule of the required readings is attached.

 

Written Work:  Students will hand in three short essays.  The first will be a 5-page paper on the following assignment.  By comparing the testimonies of Olaudah Equiano, with that of EITHER James Albert Ukawsaw Gronniosaw OR John Marrant, discuss the most important ways these writers contested the institution of slavery. Their autobiographical writings are in Vincent Carretta, ed., Unchained Voices.  This essay is due on Feb. 8.  The second is a comparison of Parts I and II of Winthrop Jordan, White Over Black, and Anthony Parent, Foul Means, due on Mar. 8.  The third is a comparison of EITHER Laurel Thatcher Ulrich, A Midwife’s Tale, and Marylynn Salmon, Women and the Law of Property OR Fred Anderson, A People’s Army and Peter Silver, Our Savage Neighbors,

due on April 19.  These papers will be a maximum of 7 pages. You may choose to hand in ONE of these papers up to a week late. Essays later than one week will be credited as work completed but will receive a mark of zero.

 

Examination:  The final examination will cover all material addressed in class and all readings assigned for essays or for consideration in the classroom.  We will discuss the nature of the examinations and essays in class. 

 

 

Marking Scheme:

 

Essay on assigned primary sources (5 pages) – 15%

Comparative essay on Jordan and Parent (7 pages) – 25%

Comparative essay on either Ulrich and Salmon or Anderson and Silver (7 pages) – 25%

Class discussion participation - 10%

End-of-Term Examination – 25%

Final marks will include a plus and minus range.

 

 

Texts:

 

The following books are available at the Bookstore.

Richard Middleton, Colonial America. A History, 1565-1776, 3rd edition (Oxford, 2002).

Fred Anderson, A People’s Army.  Massachusetts Soldiers and Society in the Seven Years War (Chapel Hill, 1984).

Vincent Carretta, ed., Unchained Voices:  An Anthology of Black Authors in the English Speaking World of the Eighteenth Century (Kentucky, 1996).

Richard Dunn, Sugar and Slaves: The Rise of the Planter Class in the English West Indies, 1624-1713 (Chapel Hill, 1972; 2000).

Winthrop D. Jordan, White Over Black:  American Attitudes Toward the Negro, 1550-1812 (Chapel Hill, 1968, 2000).

Anthony S. Parent Jr., Foul Means:  the Formation of Slave Society in Virginia, 1660 -1740 (Chapel Hill, 2003).

Marylynn Salmon, Women and the Law of Property in Early America (Chapel Hill, 1986)

Peter Silver, Our Savage Neighbors:  How Indian War Transformed Early America (New York, 2008).

Laurel Thatcher Ulrich, A Midwife’s Tale:  the Life of Martha Ballard, Based on her Diary, 1785-1812 (New York, 1990).

 

Course Packet (articles by Greene, Kupperman, and Olson) 

 

HIS 317L • Colonial America-W

39450 • Spring 2010
Meets T 500pm-800pm GAR 3.116
show description

The University of Texas at Austin
History Department

History 317L (39450)
American Colonial History

Spring Term 2010

Instructor: A. Tully

Main History Office, Garrison Hall

Office Hours: Tuesdays 10:00-12:00 

This course examines the chief characteristics of Anglo-American culture from the initial permanent English settlement of British North America in the early seventeenth century to the emergence of provincial societies in the mid-eighteenth century.  Its theme is the settlement and unsettlement of North America as migrants from Europe and Africa mingled with aboriginals already in the New World.  We will look comparatively at different colonizing experiments in North America and the Caribbean, in order to comprehend the varied and often international context within which colonial history took place. At he same time, we will look for the values that shaped early American institutions and social norms and examine them against alternatives both that other contemporary societies offered and that the circumstances of colonial life suggested.  In doing so we will attempt to understand how environment and experience shaped distinctive new world cultures.

Course Requirements

All students will attend weekly lectures and discussions that take place in the third class hour.  Discussions will focus on the assigned readings and students will be expected to participate actively. Participation marks will be based on attendance and the instructor’s evaluation of student contributions to discussion. Students are responsible for lecture material along with that contained in the required readings and for any changes to the syllabus that are announced in class.  Although there is some overlap between texts and lectures, lectures do not simply repeat material in the readings. I do not provide copies of lectures and attendees are prohibited from recording lectures and discussions.  A schedule of the required readings is attached.

Written Work:  Students will hand in three short essays.  The first will be a 5-page paper on the following assignment.  By comparing the testimonies of Olaudah Equiano, with that of EITHER James Albert Ukawsaw Gronniosaw OR John Marrant, discuss the most important ways these writers contested the institution of slavery. Their autobiographical writings are in Vincent Carretta, ed., Unchained Voices.  This essay is due on Feb. 9.  The second is a comparison of Parts I and II of Winthrop Jordan, White Over Black, and Anthony Parent, Foul Means, due on Mar. 9.  The third is a comparison of Laurel Thatcher Ulrich, A Midwife’s Tale, and Daniel Vickers, Farmers and Fishermen, due on April 20.  These papers will be a maximum of 7 pages. You may choose to hand in ONE of these papers up to a week late. Essays later than one week will be credited as work completed but will receive a mark of zero.

Examination:  The final examination will cover all material addressed in class and all readings assigned for essays or for consideration in the classroom.  We will discuss the nature of the examinations and essays in class. 

Marking Scheme:

 Essay on assigned primary sources (5 pages) – 15%

Comparative essay on Jordan and Parent (7 pages) – 25%

Comparative essay on Ulrich and Vickers (7 pages) – 25%

Class discussion participation - 10%

End-of-Term Examination – 25%

Final marks will include a plus and minus range.

 Texts:

The following books are available at the Bookstore.

Richard Middleton, Colonial America. A History, 1565-1776, 3rd edition (Oxford, 2002).

Vincent Carretta, ed., Unchained Voices:  An Anthology of Black Authors in the English Speaking World of the Eighteenth Century (Kentucky, 1996).

Richard Dunn, Sugar and Slaves: The Rise of the Planter Class in the English West Indies, 1624-1713 (Chapel Hill, 1972; 2000).

Winthrop D. Jordan, White Over Black:  American Attitudes Toward the Negro, 1550-1812 (Chapel Hill, 1968, 2000).

Anthony S. Parent Jr., Foul Means:  the Formation of Slave Society in Virginia, 1660 -1740 (Chapel Hill, 2003).

Laurel Thatcher Ulrich, A Midwife’s Tale:  the Life of Martha Ballard, Based on her Diary, 1785-1812 (New York, 1990).

Daniel Vickers, Farmers and Fishermen:  Two Centuries of Work in Essex County Massachusetts, 1630-1850 (Chapel Hill, 1994).

Course Packet (articles by Greene, Kupperman, and Olson)

Schedule of Lecture Topics and Readings

Jan. 19                                    Introduction

                                    Middleton, Colonial America, 6-8, 387-404. 


Jan. 26                                    Chesapeake Society in the Seventeenth Century

Middleton, Colonial America, 8-14, 47-66, 95-102, 130-140, 166-169.


Feb. 2                                    West Indian Colonization

Middleton, Colonial America, 122-128, 184-189.

Discussion of Dunn, Sugar and Slaves


Feb.  9                                    Slavery in the South

Middleton, Colonial America, 197-203, 285-310.

Greene. – article in course packet

Essay #1 due.


Feb.  16                         New York

                                    Middleton, Colonial America, 103-109, 115-122. 161-166, 404-414


Feb.  23                        New France

                                     Middleton, Colonial America, 404-415.


Mar.  2                                    Puritan New England

Middleton, Colonial America, 8-14, 67-93, 154-161, 173-181

Kupperman, article in course packet


Mar.  9                                    The Quaker Presence

Middleton, Colonial America, 145-152, 181-184, 367-375.

                                    Essay #2 due


Mar.  17                        Spring Break


Mar.  30                        Natives and Newcomers

                                     Middleton, Colonial America, 15-43-313-341.


Apr. 6                           Trans-Atlantic and Domestic Economies

                                     Middleton, Colonial America, 205-223, 224-238, 239-257.

Discussion of Ulrich, A Midwife’s Tale.


Apr. 13                        Religious Revivals and Civil Society

Middleton, Colonial America, 258-284, 376-380, 380-385.


Apr. 20                        The Political Economy and Politics of the British Atlantic

                                    Middleton, Colonial America, 114-115, 153-171, 173, 342-363

                                    Olson, article in course packet

                                    Essay #3 due


Apr.  27                        The Clash of Empires (and Review)

                                    Middleton, Colonial America, 189-192, 415-436.

May  4                                    Examination

University Regulations

Students with Disabilities

The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities.  To determine if you qualify, please contact the Dean of Students at 471-6259; 471-4641 TTY.  If that office certifies your needs, I will work with you to make appropriate arrangements.

Notice about Missed Work due to Religious Holy Days

A student who misses an examination, work assignment, or other project due to the observance of a religious holy day will be given an opportunity to complete the work missed within a reasonable time after the absence, provided that he or she has properly notified the instructor.  It is the policy of the University of Texas at Austin that the student must notify the instructor at least fourteen days prior to the class scheduled on dates he or she will be absent to observe a religious holy day.  For religious holy days that fall within the first two weeks of the semester, the notice should be given on the first day of the semester.  The student will not be penalized for these excused absences, but the instructor may appropriately respond if the student fails to complete satisfactorily the missed assignment of examination within a reasonable time after the excused absence.

Academic Integrity

Students who violate University rules on scholastic dishonesty are subject to disciplinary penalties, including the possibility of failure in the course and/or dismissal from the University.  Because such dishonesty harms the individual, all students, and the integrity of the University, policies on scholastic dishonesty will be strictly enforced.  For further information please visit the Student Judicial Services Web site: Http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sis

 

HIS 317L • Colonial America-W

38925 • Spring 2009
Meets T 500pm-800pm GAR 0.132
show description

Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history.

HIS 350L • History Of History-W

39125 • Spring 2009
Meets W 300pm-600pm GAR 2.108
show description

Lectures, discussion, reading, and research on selected topics in the field of history.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Designed for History majors. 

History 350L and 350R may not both be counted unless the topics vary.

Course carries Writing flag. 

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